[RSArchive Icon] Rudolf Steiner Archive Home  Version 2.5.4
 [ [Table of Contents] | Search ]


[Spacing]
Searching The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity
Matches

You may select a new search term and repeat your search. Searches are not case sensitive, and you can use regular expressions in your queries.


Enter your search term:
by: title, keyword, or contextually
   


Query was: experience

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: PoSA: Cover Sheet
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
  • Title: PoSA: Contents
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
  • Title: PoSA: Bibliographical Note
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
  • Title: PoSA: Foreword
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • experience consisting in the fact that man's consciousness comes to an
    • to awaken in the reader a new experience of the world of ideas, to
    • and a wide experience in presenting the fundamentals of his philosophical
    • As one comes to a living experience of The Philosophy of Spiritual
    • him from others, his enhanced experience of thinking helps him to a deeper,
  • Title: PoSA: Introduction - Rudolf Steiner as a Philosopher
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • a thinking effort, but is based on spiritual experiences. In the world of
    • philosophical system was based on immediate spiritual experience. For this
    • can never be grasped by means of our consciousness, and that the experiences of
    • contrast, there was no doubt for Steiner that “the experiences of our
    • senses, then we are able to experience the world in its reality. Steiner
    • Schiller answered, “This is not an experience; this is an idea.” To this
    • relationship between a spiritual and a sense experience. Schiller, on the
    • one hand, emphasizes the contrast: the two experiences can never be united.
    • metamorphosed, must be enhanced, in order to experience the idea of
    • experience. This fundamentally new principle, however, is by no means
    • however, we experience them as separated. Perceptions are presented to us;
    • experienced things in this way.
    • division of the world into that of human experience and that of the objects
    • transcendental principle is not consciously experienced by man. It is rather
    • his physical organization by which he experiences himself.
    • experiences in reality, as the reflection of the mirror is to the original.
    • the spiritual world itself, and on the other, is receiving its experiences
    • experience this spiritual world consciously; and this training consists of
    • come to spiritual experiences, Rudolf Steiner's philosophy will still be a
  • Title: PoSA: Preface to the Revised Edition, 1918
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • man can become the foundation of all human knowledge and experience of life.
    • We often feel that our experiences and the results of scientific
    • investigations are not self-supporting; further experiences or discoveries
    • intention is to show that the inner experiences caused by the second problem
    • will not be given, but a region of experiences within the human soul will be
    • of spiritual experience described in my later writings, then he must consider
    • spirit before entering upon spiritual experience. And this justification
    • cast furtive glances at the experiences which my later writings have shown
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter I: The Conscious Human Deed
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • oneself from it. For although experience teaches us often enough that man,
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter II: The Fundamental Urge For Knowledge
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • meet sets us a problem. Every experience contains a riddle. We see emerging
    • of perfection and we investigate the conditions for this experience. Nowhere
    • and strives to penetrate with thinking what he experiences by observing.
    • experienced by the I by means of material processes. Such material processes
    • content of experience. As little as it is possible for the materialist to
    • the simple description of what everyone experiences in his own
    • science, so far, has interpreted consciousness, but with how we experience
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter III: Thinking in the Service of Understanding the World
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • experiences we first become aware of through observation. The contents of
    • these objects appear within the range of my experience. But my thinking that
    • experience I have had of my thinking-process. If I wanted to observe my
    • we make of our experiences and weaves them into a network of concepts, is
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter IV: The World as Perception
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • is the concept of the object. The further our range of experience is
    • this: Because we have experienced countless times in life that a disturbance
    • if a point of attack can be found. Experience soon shows that it is found.
    • experience of distance grasps at the moon, and does not correct his first
    • experience them in the perception of my own self. Perceptions would come and
    • change in us, the modification experienced in the self, has been thrust into
    • can experience only the modification in our own self, not the
    • the only thing we experience and learn to know directly and, just because
    • we have direct experience of it, even the most radical doubt cannot rob us of
    • the external world which are utterly different from the experiences we have
    • the form most general of all possible and thinkable experiences, more general
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter V: The Act of Knowing the World
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • as we shut our senses to the external world. If the things we experience
    • which is related to mere perceiving as waking experience is related to
    • experiences them to be so. The first step, however, which is taken beyond
    • the sum of what we experience through mere perception, and to regard as a
    • experience it in order to recognize how far it leads one astray, and
    • experience to what confusion every first reflection about such a relation can
    • that I experience is, after all, only my representation; I know about a
    • imposes upon us. This is the mistake that is made when it is said: I experience
    • can experience by means of perceiving, be it within ourselves or outside in
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VI: The Human Individuality
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • practical experience.
    • individualized concepts will be the man of richer practical experience. A
    • experience. He again loses the objects from his field of vision because he
    • gather practical experience. It is true that he can acquire concepts by one
    • experience.
    • which we experience as pleasure or displeasure.
    • experience self-feeling, and with the perception of objects pleasure and
    • feelings resound with the experiences of the outer world, the more we cut
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VII: Are There Limits to Knowledge?
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • experience. One can obtain a content for the hypothetical universal
    • principle only by borrowing a content from the sphere of experience and then
    • sphere of experience into the concept of the thing-in-itself, it still
    • remains impossible to derive the rich concrete life of experience from those
    • (naive realist) regards the objects of external experience as realities. The
    • The self-dependent nature of what can be experienced, not physically but
    • things, is contradicted by experience, which shows us that the content of
    • of how we experience concepts and perceptions. Such investigations show that
    • experience thinking in its own nature, that is, to experience the active
    • the experience of something perceptible through the senses. Whatever senses
    • permeated by thinking which is livingly experienced leads man into reality.
    • it would be an enrichment or a transformation of human experience. But a real
    • knowledge of this experience also could be attained only through the interplay
    • living experience within thinking, this intuition can dive down into
    • an unconscious sleeping state, so, for man's self-experience is needed besides
    • these amplifications to the content because he has found by experience that many
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VIII: The Factors of Life
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • the mystic wants to experience
    • subjective experience.
    • itself to the perception. In feeling, it experiences a relation of the object
    • experienced directly. An adherent of this philosophy believes that in the
    • Here something which can be experienced only individually is made into the
    • experience. According to mysticism of feeling and philosophy of will, what
    • flows from the source of experience
    • experienced cannot be grasped by thinking. In other words: mysticism of
    • to be present in those spheres of existence where a direct experience
    • principle outside the subject, for which subjective experience is the sole
    • that to experience existence merely in feeling or in will cannot in any way
    • time alive experience, of the life within thinking, and no longer will
    • richness, because of this inner fullness of living experience, that its
    • feeling warm the human soul even when experienced only in recollection.
    • experience intuitively in thinking, will also be able to do justice to
    • what is experienced in the realm of feeling and in the element of will, whereas
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter IX: The Idea of Freedom
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • experienced as a self-contained reality. In order to explain thinking as
    • first allows it to appear as full reality, is experienced in the act of
    • conscious experience of a purely spiritual content, taking place in the
    • at first. For ordinary experience, human thinking only takes place connected
    • experience,
    • experience have certain perceptions, there always also enter into their
    • force of the will, practical experience. Practical experience gradually
    • skip over all deliberation based on experience and pass over directly from
    • content of moral ideas to certain experiences (perceptions). But the highest
    • ability to experience the moral principle that applies in a particular
    • can be experienced intuitively; the action will be “bad” if this is not the
    • experience
    • personal experience would be valid in its sphere. Individuality is possible
    • soul through which man, in his experience of himself among fellow men for
    • moral life point to his twofold nature: perceiving (direct experience) and
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter X: Philosophy of Freedom and Monism
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • hypothetically imagines reality as an addition to actual experience.
    • kind of metaphysical realism which does not experience, but infers something
    • oneself to be confronted by a contradiction. On the one hand, the experience
    • and cannot recognize that it is just in a living experience of this actually
    • experienced as a self-sustaining reality, it is clear that in the sphere
    • cognitive ideas and the individual character of moral ideas, when experienced
    • which is universally valid, and the individual experience of this universal
    • not recognize that thinking can be experienced, or take it to be an activity
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XI: World Purpose and Life Purpose
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • absolute Being that cannot be experienced and is only inferred, the reason
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XII: Moral Imagination
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • to him, i.e., in his past experience. Before making a decision he recalls
    • cannot be experienced by means of ideas. This approach would then be
    • experience. The monist does not find that the nature of a will impulse, as a
    • within human experience it becomes an individual's own. For monism, moral
    • inferred God whose existence cannot be experienced) determines my moral
    • is presented what man can experience in his actions and, through this, come
    • to the conscious experience: My will is free. It is of particular
    • through the experience: In my will an ideal intuition comes to realization.
    • This experience can only come about as a result of observation, but
    • will the same mood of soul he also experiences when he is conscious of
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XIII: The Value of Life
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • he tries to base his world view on experience. By observation of
    • But is the above really based on experience?
    • an experienced enjoyment produces in me the demand for the experience of a
    • experiences, is correct.”
    • that he is calculating something which is never experienced.
    • estimation of life is true experience, not the result of an
    • over which a veil is drawn, he really did experience in all their intensity,
    • pleasure from them; one who has overcome them, gains through the experiences
    • selfless labor. Not until they have convinced themselves through experience
    • the creature experiences enjoyment accordingly. This has a lesser value the
    • which the numerator is the enjoyment actually experienced and the
    • satisfied. The fraction becomes greater than 1 when a creature experiences
    • demands made by this craving, then the value of the pleasure experienced
    • experience the pleasure of realization even when we have to bear a much
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XIV: Individuality and Species
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • of the human race, when rightly experienced by the individual do not
  • Title: PoSA: The Consequences of Monism
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • from human experience
    • the unity that thinking observation — which can be experienced —
    • experience of thinking. Thinking destroys the appearance due to perceiving,
    • entity existing beyond the world to be experienced (an inferred God, will,
    • connections that are recognizable through experience, one strove to attain a
    • second kind of knowledge which would go beyond experience and would reveal
    • the connection between experience and the ultimate entities existing beyond
    • experience (metaphysics arrived at by drawing conclusions and not by
    • experience). From this standpoint, it was thought that the reason we can
    • experience, but not experience mediated through perceiving. One unable to
    • actually experience. By contrast, monism shows that thinking is neither
    • overcome — within experience itself — the one-sidedness of mere
    • add something to our experience that cannot be experienced (a Beyond), but
    • beyond this world for a higher reality that cannot be experienced. The
    • monist does not look for Absolute Reality anywhere but in experience,
    • because he recognizes that the content of experience is the reality. And he
    • be experienced Beyond is based on a misunderstanding on the part of those
    • combination of two abstractions drawn from experience. Exactly the same is
    • which is experienced.
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: PoSA: First Appendix
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • other person who confronts me. What is experienced consciously by him has
    • that is quite independent of my conscious experience is produced in my
    • I grasp as an experience that is like the experience of my own thinking. I have
    • conscious to what can never become conscious, but by actual experience of
    • cannot have direct experience of them in any way. Beyond human consciousness
    • content of our consciousness which we experience. In the essay mentioned
    • the perceptual content, grasped by a thinking that is also experienced, is
    • consciousness of each person — in his experience of thinking —
    • thinking that is experienced. The transcendental realist does not enter into
  • Title: PoSA: Second Appendix
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • experience everything in the depth of its being. Only that kind of
    • but springs from the inner experience of our personality.
    • justified in proceeding from his immediate experience, from the facts he
    • if one wants to experience existence in all its aspects. One understanding
    • One must be able to confront the idea in living experience, or else fall
  • Title: PoSA: Editorial and Reference Notes
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
  • Title: PoSA: Back Cover
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
  • Title: PoSA: Inside Dust Jacket
    Matching lines:
    • consciousness. Read properly, it leads the reader to the experience of
    • new experience of Freedom, worthy of the dignity of man.



The Rudolf Steiner Archive is maintained by:
The e.Librarian: elibrarian@elib.com