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  • Title: PoSA: Cover Sheet
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
  • Title: PoSA: Contents
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • The Factors of Life
  • Title: PoSA: Bibliographical Note
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
  • Title: PoSA: Foreword
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • experience consisting in the fact that man's consciousness comes to an
  • Title: PoSA: Introduction - Rudolf Steiner as a Philosopher
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • been missing from it. This missing, however, is not an objective fact but only
    • the consequence of the fact that by means of our senses we perceive the
    • Steiner suggests that in earlier times, as a matter of fact, all mankind
    • the fact that we think our I to be somewhere within our physical
    • are free; rather it is the fact that man is capable of comprehending the
    • all live in one spiritual world. Thus, despite the fact that every single
  • Title: PoSA: Preface to the Revised Edition, 1918
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • recognition of the fact that man is living within the reality of a spiritual
    • the fact, apparent from what I have just said, that to me it seems that
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter I: The Conscious Human Deed
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • fact as freedom. Opposed to them are others who regard as utterly
    • fact that he is driven to it by a cause which he has to obey
    • and all who think like him, overlook the fact that man not only is conscious
    • factors: the motive and the character. If one regards all men as alike, or
    • And this leads directly to the standpoint from which the facts will be
    • as soon as our conduct rises above the sphere of the satisfaction of purely
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter II: The Fundamental Urge For Knowledge
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • for knowledge is but a special instance of this dissatisfaction. If we look
    • seek what we call explanation of the facts.
    • satisfactory, for they do not do justice to the facts. Dualism sees spirit (I)
    • can never arrive at a satisfactory explanation of the world. For
    • doing so, it straightway confronts two different kinds of facts, namely, the
    • clarifying the actual facts. I have, therefore, made no attempt to use the
    • describing the facts of everyday conditions. I am concerned, not with how
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter III: Thinking in the Service of Understanding the World
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • shown by the fact that I could rest content with the observation and forgo
    • For the time being we wish merely to establish the fact that we constantly
    • observation of thinking itself is a sort of exceptional situation. This fact
    • to be clear about the fact that when thinking is observed the same procedure
    • conscious of the fact that the concept of a thing is built up by my
    • is turned to it. This activity is, in fact, thinking contemplation. My
    • fact, and to speak of the rightness or wrongness of a fact has no sense. At
    • has been referred to as a fact which reveals itself to a really unprejudiced
    • facts. To make it means that one has not taken into consideration that it is
    • the “I,” must first make himself blind to the plain facts that are there for
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter IV: The World as Perception
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    • I must draw special attention to the fact that thinking is my point of
    • the fact that the growing human being slowly and gradually forms concepts
    • never to say that my individual subject thinks; in fact, my subject exists
    • the fact that they inhabit the earth. This dependence of our
    • their quality. The fact that I see a red surface as red — this qualitative
    • disregards the fact of its being perceived. There is no color
    • take into account the fact that the perception is partially determined by
    • immediate content of the perception of myself is the fact that I am the
    • thought here indicated has, in fact, been characterized by
    • brain, ceases, in fact, with what I should observe if I could treat the brain
    • objective, valid facts, and, what is more, fails to see that it mixes up two
    • based, is, however, wrecked by the fact, already mentioned, that the eye and
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter V: The Act of Knowing the World
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • are representations. This proof is supposed to follow from the fact that if
    • life. To adopt this view is to fail to see that in fact there is something
    • usually overlook thinking (See p. 61f.). This is due to the fact that we
    • subjective act, and it is due to the fact that man is not identical with the
    • Through the fact that the thinking in us reaches out beyond our separate
    • common factor in the separate entities of the world, other than the ideal
    • “In fact, the meaning sought for in the world that confronts me solely
    • If it is to become clear to us that this or that fact has greater
    • important limb. The separate facts appear in their own significance, as well
    • absolute nature of thinking, but relies on the fact that naive realism, when
    • representation will also then make it possible for us to gain a satisfactory
    • becomes conscious of the fact that man himself creates this relation, at
    • appears in me. From noticing this fact, it is but a step to the opinion: All
    • reality except by artificially curbing the thirst for knowledge. The fact
    • but overlooks the fact that this insight, which is true for other things, does
    • this fact: that an unprejudiced observation of thinking inevitably shows that
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VI: The Human Individuality
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    • main difficulty lies in the fact that we ourselves are not the external
    • shock, and by the nose as a phosphoric smell. What follows from these facts?
    • process would not exist at all? From the fact that an electrical process
    • The above-mentioned physiological fact cannot, therefore, throw any light on
    • fully for all the determining factors in our milieu.
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VII: Are There Limits to Knowledge?
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • organization that determines the fact that the full, complete reality of
    • shutting one's eyes to the fact of the borrowing. Otherwise it remains an
    • to the conclusion: We can never find a satisfactory explanation of how
    • fact that a sphere of perceptions, conditioned by time, space, and our
    • to be due to merely subjective factors, so the dualist, in fact, transfers
    • splits up the two factors concerned in the process of cognition, perception
    • fact that his hands can grasp and his eyes can see these objects is for him
    • fact, the basic axiom of the naive man, and it is held to be equally valid
    • The monist never has any need to ask for factors other than perceptions and
    • perceptions and concepts. By means of my perceiving and, in fact, by means
    • concept, so likewise the union of these two factors gives us a true
    • subjective factors? How, from my subjective world picture, can I infer
    • believes he can infer, from the fact that people come to terms with one
    • perceptual facts one can infer the character of the thing-in-itself which
    • underlies these facts. Just as in the past one tried to derive the
    • thinking, as here described, may also be disturbed by the fact that in the
    • how significant, also for knowledge of the being of man, is the fact that
    • but also by the fact that he excludes something else from this direct
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VIII: The Factors of Life
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    • Chapter VIII: The Factors of Life
    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • THE FACTORS OF LIFE
    • However, the presupposition does not correspond to the facts. We relate
    • factor, the concept or idea. This is why in actual life, feelings, like
    • fundamentally and indivisibly bound up with feeling. This fact leads the
    • a purely ideal factor is just as much a merely perceived object as any
    • constituent factor of the world.
    • observe and grasp the nature of thinking lies in the fact that its nature
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter IX: The Idea of Freedom
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    • of thinking. Quite obvious facts seem to contradict this
    • that the true facts can only be seen when it has been recognized that
    • organization come about through the fact that thinking prepares its
    • fact that the imprints of the activity of thinking are engraved upon the
    • The factors to be considered in a particular act of will are the motive and
    • organism. The conceptual factor, or motive, is the momentary source from
    • observations, that is, on the subjective and the objective factors of
    • satisfaction of our lower, purely animal needs (hunger, sexual intercourse,
    • particular feeling to the perception, as in fact happens in conventional
    • definite representation of this welfare, but to the fact that each person
    • situation, is the deciding factor in an intuitively determined action. At
    • impulses. General norms always presuppose concrete facts from which they can
    • be derived. But facts must first be produced by human deeds.
    • actions where this relation is the determining factor. If I, or someone
    • right to express itself as has the intention to do my best. The fact that I
    • Nevertheless, in the human will intuition can be the determining factor,
    • And, in fact, only an act of will which springs from intuition can be
    • general species, man; the fact that something ideal comes to expression in a
    • another as a man. In fact, at every moment the perceptual picture of myself
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter X: Philosophy of Freedom and Monism
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
    • question in materialism as well as in one-sided spiritualism, in fact in any
    • factors for explaining world-phenomena within the world, and none outside
    • feature of human nature consists in the fact that what can be intuitively
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XI: World Purpose and Life Purpose
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    • upon the cause only through the conceptual factor. For the perceptual factor
    • of the effect is simply not present prior to the perceptual factor of the
    • that factor in the blossom which he confirms in it through his thinking. The
    • perceptual factor of the blossom had as yet no existence at the time the
    • place something perceptible where only ideal factors are to be recognized. In
    • nature. The purpose contained in the arrangement consists in the fact that I
    • the concept of purpose for all facts not produced by man, because his
    • natural process. The fact that thinking is presented here as a purely
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XII: Moral Imagination
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    • mistake arises through the fact that moral laws, insofar as their content is
    • spot out in the world-ether. The fact that in such a representation, both
    • ones come about as real facts, that if we are given the concept of the imperfect
    • arises because when we investigate nature the facts are there before we gain
    • produce the facts which we afterwards cognize. In the evolutionary process
    • the fact that, first, through the intuitive element the necessary
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XIII: The Value of Life
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    • Eternal striving, ceaseless craving for satisfaction which yet can never be
    • so on. Satisfaction can always be only for an infinitely short time. All the
    • dissatisfaction and suffering. If at last the blind urge is dulled, then all
    • all so-called satisfaction turns out to be nothing but illusion.
    • culture, — we have sources of happiness and satisfaction. Soberly
    • an ideal factor (wisdom) in the world, but even grants it equal significance
    • Man must recognize to the full that to pursue individual satisfaction
    • To strive after satisfaction means that the life activities go beyond the life
    • satisfaction of a desire, displeasure means its non-satisfaction. Both
    • he must clear out of the way those factors which falsify our judgment
    • the fact that the sexual instinct is very strong in us misleads us into
    • anticipating a pleasure far greater than in fact occurs. We want to enjoy,
    • value of life dependent on factors other than pleasure.
    • considerable profit of a toy-factory at a quarter of the actual amount
    • because the factory produces playthings for children.
    • the facts. If this is not the case, he will let the accountant go through
    • necessity lies in the fact that the world purpose mentioned above (p. 43)
    • satisfaction. Man, whose selfishness desires the grapes of pleasure, finds
    • satisfaction, and the enjoyment of life is thereby impaired. But the
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XIV: Individuality and Species
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    • individuality seems to be contradicted by two facts: that he exists as a
    • inclinations, whereas woman's tends to be determined exclusively by the fact
  • Title: PoSA: The Consequences of Monism
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    • the laws pervading and determining perceptions, do we deal in actual fact
    • these two factors. One factor appears to perception, the other to intuition.
    • the same satisfaction must also be possible, if the borrowed content is
    • The monist does not deny the ideal; in fact he considers a perceptual
    • Therefore it can acknowledge no ideas that refer to objective factors lying
    • simply that the fact of the borrowing has been overlooked.
    • beyond the satisfaction of his natural instincts, for which Mother Nature
    • actual fact it is only through man that it can be taken from that world and
  • Title: PoSA: First Appendix
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    • endeavors to survey the matter from the point of view that observes facts in
    • fact that I bring them before me means at the same time their extinction as
    • consists in the fact that the thinking of the other takes the place of my
    • consciousness this expresses itself in the fact that in experiencing the
    • why one tends to be deluded about these facts; one is that in perceiving the
    • accordance with facts, both physical and spiritual, but instead they erect
    • it overlooks the fact that consciousness has no other object than itself.
    • the actual facts concerned in the process of knowledge; he excludes himself
    • whereas in actual fact the
    • for example. In fact, the viewpoint of the
  • Title: PoSA: Second Appendix
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    • despite the prevalent scientific trend of thought, and in fact just because
    • justified in proceeding from his immediate experience, from the facts he
    • All science would be nothing but the satisfaction of idle curiosity if it did
  • Title: PoSA: Editorial and Reference Notes
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  • Title: PoSA: Back Cover
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    • The Philosophy of Spiritual Activity demonstrates the fact of freedom -
  • Title: PoSA: Inside Dust Jacket
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