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  • Title: PoSA: Foreword
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    • understanding with itself.” Therefore The Philosophy of Spiritual
    • answers within himself, for only then will they acquire that deep significance
    • feeling to awaken within himself. He cannot simply allow these to flow into
  • Title: PoSA: Introduction - Rudolf Steiner as a Philosopher
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    • soul forces, and that the divine spiritual principle manifests itself in man
    • in opposition to Kant, and thus put himself in opposition to the
    • manifests itself in the world of the senses. Whenever this fundamental
    • who hides himself and manifests himself in all these various forms and
    • itself.
    • from Konigsberg himself calls it.” But for Kant, the “Old Man from
    • considered himself as possessing a power of judgment by looking at an object
    • (an “anschauende Urteilskraft”); he says that the thinking itself must be
    • of the senses itself. The physical phenomena are riddles which the thinking
    • itself. For the world is presented to us by two means: by sense perception
    • thinking process, he himself participates in the transcendental order of
    • his physical organization by which he experiences himself.
    • transcendental principle without “forgetting” itself. But the content
    • the spiritual world itself, and on the other, is receiving its experiences
    • highly important contribution toward man's understanding of himself and of the
    • self. In a letter dated December 5, 1893, addressed to John Henry Mackay,
    • way toward this completion. But it is only and exclusively Man himself who
    • The answer is given by a process of self-liberation.
  • Title: PoSA: Preface to the Revised Edition, 1918
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    • investigations are not self-supporting; further experiences or discoveries
    • characterize the aim of this book. In the first edition I limited myself to
    • completion of this revised edition. Again and again I have asked myself
    • critical discussion, tempting though it would be in itself, has no place in
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter I: The Conscious Human Deed
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    • the necessity of His nature. Similarly, God knows Himself and all else in
    • oneself from it. For although experience teaches us often enough that man,
    • he sees the better and pursues the worse, yet he considers himself free,
    • regards himself as its free originator. But, in doing so, he overlooks the
    • something, or whether I do not. At first sight this seems a self-evident
    • with his character, be adopted as a motive, man believes himself to be free,
    • considered here. Is it at all permissible to consider by itself the question
    • cause of the donkey's turning round, but that it is itself unconditioned; it
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter II: The Fundamental Urge For Knowledge
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    • The other strongly lifts itself from dust
    • The whole situation I have described here, presents itself to us on the
    • worlds, but he is unable to find it. In as far as man is aware of himself as
    • as belonging to the world. In doing so, man places himself within the contrast
    • so far, monism has fared no better. Up to now it has tried to justify itself in
    • the problem to another place. Instead of to himself, he ascribes to matter
    • satisfied with itself and with its existence? The materialist has turned his
    • himself in a corner. Confronting the I, which can be placed on the side of
    • the “I” does not find in itself if it regards its own nature as
    • world; in the world of his ideas he sees the spiritual world itself. As a
    • who holds himself up in the air by his own pigtail.
    • being come to manifest itself in two different ways, if it is an indivisible
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter III: Thinking in the Service of Understanding the World
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    • I myself am the doer may be illusion, but to immediate observation this
    • been observed does not of itself reveal anything about its connection with
    • reality, subject and object, appearance and thing-in-itself, ego and
    • the same moment. I would first have to transport myself to a place outside
    • observation of thinking itself is a sort of exceptional situation. This fact
    • no question of an effect on me. I learn nothing about myself by knowing the
    • about myself; but when I say of the same thing: It gives me a feeling of
    • pleasure, I characterize not only the rose but also myself in my relation to
    • because it depends upon our own activity. What I myself do not bring about,
    • enters my field of observation as something objective. I find myself
    • present thinking, I would have to split myself into two persons: one to do
    • thinking insofar as it presents itself to observation of our spiritual
    • cannot overcome materialism lacks the ability to bring about in himself the
    • not have the good will to place himself in this situation, then one can no
    • he himself brings to existence; he finds himself confronted not by a foreign
    • myself bring it to its sure existence: my thinking. Perhaps it also has some
    • it is present in the sense that I myself bring it forth, of that I am
    • world content it is in my thinking that I grasp myself within that activity
    • itself, but I shall learn it when I consider the event in its relation to
    • itself. As thinker I am such an object, for I give my existence the definite,
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  • Title: PoSA: Chapter IV: The World as Perception
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    • through itself, that it is determined by nothing but itself, cannot simply
    • We must now pass from thinking itself to the being who thinks, for it is
    • him as given; insofar as he thinks, he appears to himself as active. He
    • regards what comes to meet him as object, and himself as thinking
    • conscious of the object; while he directs his thinking to himself he is
    • conscious of himself, or is self-conscious. Human consciousness of
    • necessity, must be self-conscious at the same time, because it is a
    • subject; rather it appears to itself as a subject because it is able to
    • me beyond myself and unites me with the objects. Yet at the same time it
    • himself and the rest of the world; but at the same time, it is also by means
    • of thinking that he defines himself as an individual who confronts the
    • can call a feeling in myself a perception, but not a sensation in the
    • of himself. When he sees a tree he believes, to begin with, that it stands
    • his opinion is that all this actually exists (by itself) and occurs just as
    • subject. I perceive not only other things; I also perceive myself. The
    • immediate content of the perception of myself is the fact that I am the
    • conscious only of this object. To this, the perception of my self can come.
    • image of the tree. This image became united with my self during my
    • observation. My self has become enriched; its content has taken a new
    • element into itself. This element I call my representation of the tree.
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  • Title: PoSA: Chapter V: The Act of Knowing the World
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    • thing-in-itself entirely or, at any rate, say that it has no significance
    • our dream-images an image of our self appears, so in waking consciousness
    • idealist then comes to maintain: “All reality transforms itself into a
    • of itself.”
    • does the I bring about, out of itself, the world of representations? Insofar
    • I-in-itself, an earnest striving for knowledge could still be kindled by a
    • worse when illusionism completely denies the existence of the I-in-itself
    • substances and forces, and of this ready-made world man makes himself a
    • you. In your soul it connects itself with a definite concept. Why should
    • mere addition, which has nothing to do with the thing itself, what reveals
    • itself through thinking observation. If I receive a rosebud today, the
    • picture that offers itself to my perception is complete only for the moment.
    • number of intermediate stages. The picture which presents itself to me at
    • Let me make myself clearer by an example. If I throw a stone horizontally
    • limited section links itself in all directions, both in time and in space,
    • within itself. Nowhere would there be a break in the stream of events. It is
    • example, is the singular quality of red present by itself, in isolation. It
    • becoming conscious of anything else. Self-perception shows me a number of
    • Self-perception does not take me beyond the sphere of what belongs to myself.
    • This perceiving myself is to be distinguished from defining myself by means
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  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VI: The Human Individuality
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    • definite intuition, a concept, unites itself with the perception. Then when
    • itself in the moment of perceiving. The degree of vividness with which I can
    • second thing with which the same concept connects itself, we recognize the
    • If our personality expressed itself only in cognition, the totality of all
    • indifference. If we could only cognize ourself as a self, we would be
    • totally indifferent to ourself. Only because with self-knowledge we
    • experience self-feeling, and with the perception of objects pleasure and
    • meaning only for my individual self. For the world my life of feeling can
    • attain value only if, as perception of my self, the feeling enters into
    • connection with a concept and, in this roundabout way, links itself to the
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VII: Are There Limits to Knowledge?
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    • the perceived object and the thing-in-itself which Kant
    • constituting one part, and confront it with the “thing-in-itself” as a
    • “thing-in-itself” belongs in this category. It is quite natural that a
    • sphere of experience into the concept of the thing-in-itself, it still
    • self-made and borrowed from the sphere of perceptions.
    • “in-itself” of things can reach no explanation of the world, already follows
    • within this world itself. What hinders him from reaching the explanation can
    • combined for itself the two elements of reality which are indivisibly united
    • through and for the I. The I sets itself the problems of
    • cognition. And it takes them from the element of thinking, in itself
    • and concept, into four: 1) the object-in-itself, 2) the perception which the
    • perception to the object-in-itself. The relation between object and subject
    • the thing-in-itself, takes place, according to him, outside of
    • and also objectively with our individual spirit (as thing-in-itself), lies
    • beyond consciousness in a being-in-itself of whom we likewise can have in
    • The self-dependent nature of what can be experienced, not physically but
    • together for itself out of the characteristics common to all tulips.
    • itself in the position of seeing its realities arise and perish, while what it
    • standpoint of naive realism itself. And as the naive realist acknowledges no
    • This self-contradictory world view leads to metaphysical realism. Beside
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  • Title: PoSA: Chapter VIII: The Factors of Life
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    • himself is one of these separate entities, a being among other beings. This
    • ourself. This self-perception would remain merely one among the many other
    • perceptions, did not something arise from the midst of this self-perception
    • the sum of all other perceptions with that of ourself. This something which
    • united with what we perceive as ourself. But in accordance with its inner
    • significance it reaches out beyond the self. It bestows on the separate
    • and stem from a unity. What is attained by self-perception, it defines
    • manifests itself in the perception of the self, but it is not merely
    • subjective, for the self characterizes itself as subject only with the help
    • of thinking. This relationship to oneself by means of thoughts is a
    • definitions of our self were added to it. We should then be beings whose
    • perceptions themselves, and between them and ourself. If we call the
    • resulting condition of our self knowledge, then according to the
    • development that we reach the point where the concept of our self dawns within
    • world with his own self. What the monist, in the sense we have described,
    • “I” relates purely ideally (conceptually) the perception to itself, and
    • itself to the perception. In feeling, it experiences a relation of the object
    • relation of our own self to the object. Everything in the will which is not
    • The form of existence in which the will appears to him within the self becomes
    • insofar as it relates itself ideally to the rest of the world.
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  • Title: PoSA: Chapter IX: The Idea of Freedom
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    • to one another is already inherent in the object itself.
    • experienced as a self-contained reality. In order to explain thinking as
    • thinking, the observer lives directly within a spiritual, self-sustaining
    • the reality of spirit in the form in which it first presents itself
    • to man, can do this in his own self-sustaining thinking.
    • reality itself. And of this he can say that it becomes present in his
    • mistake this counterpart for thinking itself. If someone walks over soft
    • possible quantity of pleasure in the individual who acts. But in itself a
    • representation of a future feeling, but not the feeling itself, can
    • feeling itself is not yet there; moreover it is to be produced by the
    • bring about the greatest amount of pleasure for oneself, that is, to attain
    • indirectly one expects a favorable influence upon one's own self through the
    • troubling himself about the origin of the concepts. In that case, we simply
    • principles is when the command announces itself to us, not through an
    • foremost the conceptual intuition itself comes into consideration. When this
    • deed which is Christian, or humane, or is deemed unselfish, or to further
    • myself who acts. At this level of morality I do not act because I acknowledge
    • source of my conduct within myself, namely, my love for the deed. I do not
    • case. Nor do I ask myself: How would another person act in my place? —
    • right to express itself as has the intention to do my best. The fact that I
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  • Title: PoSA: Chapter X: Philosophy of Freedom and Monism
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    • powerful than himself, or whom he acknowledges, for some other reason, to be
    • himself, then he will seek guidance from a higher power, from a divine
    • possibilities. If the presupposed Being is thought of as in itself
    • thinks of it, then out of itself it must also produce, by purely mechanical
    • myself to be the creator of my deeds, it is the material substances of which
    • believe myself to be free, whereas in reality all my actions are but results
    • reason will be regarded as issuing from this Being-in-itself, which has its
    • the Being-in-itself, the extra-human Being. Man ought to do what this
    • Being wills. Eduard von Hartmann, who sees the Being-in-itself as the
    • Being-in-itself, as a spiritual entity in which man has no conscious share)
    • lets man be determined, mechanically or morally, by a “Being-in-itself.”
    • impulses of action stemming from a so-called “Being-in-itself.” According to
    • external compulsion; it is free when he obeys himself. Monism cannot
    • realization in himself.
    • particular purpose. For the world of ideas expresses itself not in a
    • process of self development, and one may ask whether, in the course of this
    • where he finds his own self.
    • oneself to be confronted by a contradiction. On the one hand, the experience
    • experienced as a self-sustaining reality, it is clear that in the sphere
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XI: World Purpose and Life Purpose
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    • out a deed which he represents to himself first of all, and he lets the
    • for subjective actions, is an element that easily lends itself to such
    • purposes that man does not set himself are unjustifiable assumptions. Only
    • man's task in life? monism can only answer: The task he sets himself. My
    • expresses and organizes itself according to a purpose.”
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XII: Moral Imagination
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    • evolution would have to represent to himself that there was once a time on
    • would have to represent to himself that it would have been possible to observe
    • through his moral imagination? For something that is to reveal itself as
    • individual is morally barren if he himself has no moral ideas.
    • be free means to be able to determine for oneself by moral imagination the
    • representations myself, not when I am only able to carry out the impulse
    • himself. Such a man is unfree in his action. Therefore, to be able to will what
    • neither wish for nor imagine than the freedom to let one's will realize itself
    • freedom. Namely: to decide for oneself the motive (foundation) of one's
    • himself considers right, this he will accept only insofar as he does not
    • unfree if it considers impure all impulses it has not itself indicated. A
    • because in ideal intuition nothing is active but its own self-sustaining
  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XIII: The Value of Life
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    • Evil is the absence of good; it has no significance in itself.
    • existence. God has created the world in order to rid Himself of His infinite
    • power of the absolute rids itself of an inward disease, “or even as a
    • painful drawing-plaster which the all-one Being applies to Himself in order
    • selfless devotion dedicate himself to the world-process of redeeming God. In
    • itself can by no means be regarded as displeasure. Therefore, if it so
    • displeasure caused by work which is not self-chosen but is forced upon us.
    • wants to make clear to himself whether, up to the moment of making this
    • life, he must free himself from two sources of error before passing
    • self-observation. Nevertheless, his judgment will be misled. The sufferings,
    • clear to himself that the recognition he pursues is something valueless.
    • If the ambitious person admits all this to himself, he will have to
    • of self conquest (not through the vain emotion, What a noble fellow I am! but
    • through the objective sources of pleasure which lie in the self-conquest) a
    • though the merchant may have avoided keeping himself informed about his
    • selfless labor. Not until they have convinced themselves through experience
    • pessimistic conviction is supposed to be a source of selflessness. An
    • recognized that selfish striving after pleasure cannot lead to any
    • satisfaction. Man, whose selfishness desires the grapes of pleasure, finds
    • devotes himself to an unselfish life. According to the opinion of
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  • Title: PoSA: Chapter XIV: Individuality and Species
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    • himself when he grows out of a totality and integrates himself into a
    • conditioned by the nature of the tribe itself. How the individual member is
    • But man makes himself free from what is generic. For the generic qualities
    • seek only in himself. In this, the generic element serves him only as a
    • to do with something individual which can be explained only through itself.
    • If a person has advanced so far as to loosen himself from the generic, and
    • by the individual qualities Or the particular woman herself, but by general
    • judge for herself. If it is true that women are useful only in those
    • activity depends on free self-assessment. What lies below this frontier can
    • and solely on the individual himself. Just as little is it possible from
    • himself. One wishing to understand a particular individual must broaden his
    • himself, in their pure form (without mixing them with our own conceptual
    • Just as a free individuality frees himself from the characteristics of the
    • Only to the degree that a man has made himself free from the characteristics
  • Title: PoSA: The Consequences of Monism
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    • accessible to self-knowledge, more particularly in moral imagination. Monism
    • itself because we do not see the cords and ropes by which the fundamental
    • self-enclosed total existence within the universe only through the intuitive
    • reality in its true character as a self-enclosed unity, whereas the
    • existence by itself. It is only a part of the great organism of nature, and
    • concept has no reality in itself, any more than a perception, taken by
    • itself, has any reality. The perception is the part of reality that is given
    • itself, we do not have reality, but a disconnected chaos; if we consider by
    • itself the law that connects perceptions, we are dealing with mere abstract
    • itself belongs in the sequence of real occurrences. By means of thinking we
    • overcome — within experience itself — the one-sidedness of mere
    • to himself is because it is the same world content that expresses itself in
    • itself in them as in a multiplicity of individuals. As long as man
    • apprehends himself merely by means of self-perception, he regards himself as
    • life in reality itself. The ideal content of another human being is also my
    • self-enclosed whole, which encompasses the content of all men's thinking. In
    • who believe that the world in which we live does not contain within itself
    • reality itself, we must also perceive. An absolute Being for which a content is
    • itself to a description of perceptions without penetrating to their ideal
    • The idea that realizes itself in a deed, man detaches from the unitary
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  • Title: PoSA: First Appendix
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    • consciousness this expresses itself in the fact that in experiencing the
    • extinction and re-appearance of self-consciousness occurs too quickly to be
    • one is not dealing with a table-in-itself but only with the object of one's
    • it overlooks the fact that consciousness has no other object than itself.
    • “thing-in-itself” could ever reach human consciousness. And if one is
    • the table' something so dissimilar as the one table as thing-in-itself, and the
    • a naive realist; he does not make it clear to himself that he can actually
    • picture of himself as well as that of the other person. Of these pictures
    • grasps himself and the other. I know that the transcendental realist describes
    • the actual facts concerned in the process of knowledge; he excludes himself
  • Title: PoSA: Second Appendix
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    • and is stored away, valid for all time. Each of us considers himself
    • convinced that one must raise oneself up into the ethereal realm of concepts
    • But life itself is a whole, and the more the sciences strive to penetrate
    • in this book the aim is a philosophical one: science itself must become a



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