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Searching Rudolf Steiner Lectures by GA number (GA0206)
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    Query was: man
  

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: Goethe and the Evolution of Consciousness
    Matching lines:
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit
    • Published in German as:
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit
    • Published in German as:
    • Science in order to comprehend man and the world are more easily
    • mental outlook of man through the centuries. If we tell people to-day
    • that in order really to know something about the nature of man, quite
    • They feel that one thing at least remains constant, namely, man's
    • evident in the outlook of many teachers of history at the present
    • man has not fundamentally changed throughout history and that if this
    • back to an age when human beings were quite differently constituted
    • modern historian infers that human beings must always have possessed
    • course of historic evolution man's life of soul has changed, we
    • There is a very significant example of a man who found it inwardly
    • As a young man Goethe necessarily grew up in the outlook of his
    • the affairs of human beings. But he really did not feel at home in
    • the revelations of the human mind. And this was the real temper of
    • contemporaries, nor indeed to the man of to-day.
    • after having first composed it in the mood of the Germanic North. Nor
    • Earth can I understand Man. — And many other passages can be
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: The Dual Form of Cognition During the Middle Ages and the Development of Knowledge in Modern Times
    Matching lines:
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit – II
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit – II
    • human evolution, events that have led up to a soul-constitution which
    • understanding attitude towards the world and man. This does not
    • of human evolution during the time comprised within the 300
    • the course of about six centuries, humanity has been trained to take
    • human world-conceptions, these gnostic documents represent that
    • human beings who were no longer able to rise to great heights of
    • intellectual elaboration is needed, for the human being already
    • that in the course of human evolution intellectualism has, in a
    • A man with a
    • that the human being now sought to gain a world-conception through
    • Aristotle. Aristotle is, as it were, the first man in human evolution
    • that humanity gradually loses altogether the possibility of
    • connecting a meaning with what had once been given to man in a
    • fourth century of our era. Particularly a man like Augustine clearly
    • depths of the human soul, but it is impossible for him to reach a
    • into man's connections with these super-sensible contents; that is to
    • say, it was not in any way possible to convey to the human beings the
    • education of humanity took on an essentially intellectual character
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: The Remedy for Our Diseased Civilisation
    Matching lines:
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit — II
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit — II
    • of human evolution present themselves under the influence of the
    • personalities. Although many sides deny this, the materialistic
    • necessary that humanity should attain these scientific results. They
    • they were able to educate mankind. And again, upon the foundation of
    • in mind has become evident in a positively radical manner, at least
    • influence upon the general culture of humanity, may be considered
    • careful study of material processes, rising as far as the human
    • addressed the assembly. It was very interesting to listen to this man
    • and to consider him a little from a spiritual standpoint. Many people
    • a conspicuous man. That physiologist, however, was a thoroughly
    • man of the same type would stand there, he would be exactly the same.
    • birthday of one of his many colleagues, a birthday like that of so
    • many others. But he also said something else. You see, he belonged to
    • so and so many thousands of microscopic slides, so and so many
    • or the man, Haeckel. The philosopher spoke of Haeckel's untidy
    • yesterday, we have within the human being, as an inner development,
    • human being, we must say: Such a world-conception grasps above all
    • the head, the nerve-sensory part of what exists in the human being,
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Development of the child up to puberty
    Matching lines:
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit, Part II,
    • published in German as,
    • Human Evolution, Cosmic Soul, Cosmic Spirit, Part II,
    • published in German as,
    • Man
    • Human development, World soul and World Spirit
    • add up to the development of mankind. Next we need consider
    • human evolution from a specific angle today. I will link these
    • dentition begins or is taking place the human being goes into a
    • the human body already. When they appear as if freed out of the
    • seventh year a soul force is active within the human being and
    • the first seven years of the human organism. We gradually see
    • actual activity within the human body, at least in part, is
    • Man
    • becoming of the human being. The fight to a certain extent in
    • while the human beings who live into the breathing exercises
    • nature were like human processes, by personifying and
    • more instructive manner.
    • There are two sides to this within the human being. On the one
    • than in the later human being. Later a person is much more of a
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Man as a Being: Lecture 1
    Matching lines:
    • Man as a Being of Sense and Perception
    • We now have to continue our study of the relationship between man and
    • the ego of another man, or the perception of the meaning of words.
    • ego, what we see first is the human form; we know that we ourselves
    • conclude that there is also an ego in this other human form which
    • senses of man which I have often enumerated. The physiological or
    • than the capacity to perceive the ego of another man. The second sense
    • from which we receive simply a sensation of standing as man in a
    • point to something of deep significance for the whole of human life.
    • that can be compared with the experience of another man's ego or of
    • then you would certainly never be objectively clear about the man's
    • amoral manner of observation. Let us take a man in whom the sense of
    • ego-sense, are poorly developed. Such a man lives as it were without
    • the man can perceive objective-subjectively. The animal smells; as you
    • (Translation not yet published.)] Let us consider the human being in
    • subjective manner, this movement and this balance are nevertheless
    • indifference whether it is a block of wood that is moved, or a man;
    • whether it is a block of wood in balance or a man. In the external
    • physical world a man in movement is exactly the same thing to observe
    • places us as human beings in the world that we are like objective
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Man as a Being: Lecture 2
    Matching lines:
    • Man as a Being of Sense and Perception
    • which belong to the upper man, constituting man's essential
    • man, the content of which stands in much the same relationship to
    • human consciousness as external experiences proper, only that these
    • experiences take place within man. We have seen that the ego-sense,
    • kind, and that we then plunge into two regions in which man's inner
    • of man and the structure of the world within him.
    • between the upper and the lower man, both of which in a certain way
    • relationship to the other. Unless we grasp this division of the human
    • century, human progress has consisted predominantly in the development
    • of ideas about natural necessity. Humanity has paid less attention in
    • recent centuries to the other pole of human experience. Anyone who is
    • This cleavage has arisen primarily because a great many of those who
    • the doctrine that man must not be regarded as consisting of body, soul
    • centuries-old custom of assuming man to consist of body and soul.
    • This is the classic example of many situations in which present-day
    • humanity believes that it forms an unprejudiced judgment, whereas the
    • For example, the man who knows nothing but the scientific thought of
    • kind of knowledge. The man who, as well as being familiar with the
    • the fourth century, will form his judgments about the relations of man
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Man as a Being: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • Man as a Being of Sense and Perception
    • THIS cleft in human nature of which I have been speaking also finds
    • of two human capacities which even the most casual examination shows
    • speaking about the being of man himself or of his relationship to the
    • man and animal are somewhat like this, though people are not generally
    • expresses a certain series of facts, to examine human death, animal
    • something quite different in man from what it is in animals. We must
    • reality of man, not from some idea we have formed of the
    • both man and animal, with the object of finding similarities between
    • happened in the case of the famous Professor Otto Liebmann. An
    • when he comes back again, and finds the man still there, he spouts
    • The human faculty of memory must be understood entirely out of human
    • out of the constitution of the senses and therefore of the human head.
    • very individual manner of memory-formation, how it differs in children
    • represents a metamorphosis of the human being's organic structure,
    • metabolic-limb man is transformed during the life between death and
    • two things go together: one of them a man brings with him from his
    • in a backward direction, entirely in the manner of memory, what has
    • the less experiences acquired by humanity in the course of its
    • evolution. The simple fact is that humanity is in such a stage of its
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.



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