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Searching Rudolf Steiner Lectures by GA number (GA0206)
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   Query type: 
    Query was: sense
  

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: Goethe and the Evolution of Consciousness
    Matching lines:
    • read in the same sense. Take, for instance, that wonderful treatise
    • literally but only according to the sense. Schiller perceived how
    • In what sense can speech, for example, and the inner activity of
    • did the ancients personify the phenomena of Nature in this sense;
  • Title: Lecture: The Dual Form of Cognition During the Middle Ages and the Development of Knowledge in Modern Times
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    • external phenomena which can be observed through the senses. This, in
    • world which appears to the external observation through the senses.
    • the intellectual faculties merely to the world of the senses, without
    • faculties merely for an external observation through the senses. In
    • the observation through the senses is, in every respect, the echo of
    • the intellect towards the external world of the senses was more
    • been taken from the world of the senses and which have been
    • of the senses offered to them. Fundamentally speaking, just about the
    • knowledge flowed out of the world of the senses, whereas the attitude
    • senses; he was, therefore, looked upon as a member of human
    • evolution within the ordinary and intellectual life of the senses.
    • can only be given through what the senses are able to observe and the
    • life of the senses and we may say: The materialistic world-conception
    • senses, this fundamental conviction has been maintained. What had
    • senses, and everything that the human being is supposed to know in
    • senses. This habit, to be sure, also produced excellent things, for
    • the senses. and the whole method of spiritism is, therefore, a
    • through our ordinary, normal senses and what we elaborate from out
    • obtained through their senses and the super-sensible; they merely
    • we go beyond the world of the senses. Sensualism and materialism
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: The Remedy for Our Diseased Civilisation
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    • hold of it, and then it is not active in a divine-spiritual sense,
    • but it is active in an ahrimanic-spiritual sense. It then leads the
    • the sense of reality, which is alone able at the present time to lead
  • Title: Development of the child up to puberty
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    • widest sense between the world and loving surroundings. We
    • feels its Ego clearly, while it had just sensed its Ego before.
    • is only what can be perceived by the senses. This is
    • does not refer to the outer sense world, it wants to describe
    • applicable to the senses, physical world, and one thus breaks
    • senses, does not depend on the law of conservation of energy
    • we have. Probably only a few slightly sense the implications of
    • open their hearts and their senses, and human hearts and human
    • aren't changed which have no significance for ordinary sense
    • minded people don't want it. They sense that here they must
    • does the psychiatrist do? He doesn't sense how the rays of
    • nonsense, even when well meant. We are confronted today with
    • stressed that at least among us many who sense this earnestness
  • Title: Man as a Being: Lecture 1
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    • Man as a Being of Sense and Perception
    • While natural science maintains that we have only five senses Steiner
    • shows that in reality we have twelve. There are the four outer senses
    • related to thinking: the ego sense, the thought sense, the word sense,
    • and the sense of hearing. Then follow the middle four senses related to
    • inner senses related to will: the sense of balance, the sense of movement,
    • the sense of life, and the sense of touch.
    • anthroposophical teaching about the senses. [Die Zwolf Sinne des
    • science takes into consideration only those senses for which obvious
    • it directly with our sense of sight, so, in exactly the same way, the
    • must ascribe to ourselves an ego-sense, just as we do a sense of
    • sight. At the same time we must be quite clear that this ego-sense is
    • the word-sense than it is to relate the ear to the sense of sound,
    • distinction between the sense that has to do with musical and vocal
    • sound and the sense for words.
    • relationship, so that we can call them all senses, we get the twelve
    • senses of man which I have often enumerated. The physiological or
    • psychological treatment of the senses is one of the weakest chapters
    • Within the range of the senses, the sense of hearing, for example, is
    • of course radically different from the sense of sight or the sense of
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Man as a Being: Lecture 2
    Matching lines:
    • Man as a Being of Sense and Perception
    • While natural science maintains that we have only five senses Steiner
    • shows that in reality we have twelve. There are the four outer senses
    • related to thinking: the ego sense, the thought sense, the word sense,
    • and the sense of hearing. Then follow the middle four senses related to
    • inner senses related to will: the sense of balance, the sense of movement,
    • the sense of life, and the sense of touch.
    • experiences take place within man. We have seen that the ego-sense,
    • the sense of thought, the word-sense, the sense of hearing, the sense
    • of warmth and the sense of sight are all experiences of the former
    • is concerned; these two regions are, first, the senses of taste and
    • smell, and then the other four, the inner senses proper.
    • but as an abstraction from the sense-world. What for Aristotle was a
    • If you take what I said yesterday about the ego-sense, the
    • thought-sense, the word-sense and so on, you will come to the
    • conclusion that in what we now experience through these senses in our
    • as the soul-life which is the outcome of the six upper senses, from
    • the ego-sense to the sense of sight, all this was at one time filled
    • Ego-sense
    • Sense of thought
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Man as a Being: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • Man as a Being of Sense and Perception
    • While natural science maintains that we have only five senses Steiner
    • shows that in reality we have twelve. There are the four outer senses
    • related to thinking: the ego sense, the thought sense, the word sense,
    • and the sense of hearing. Then follow the middle four senses related to
    • inner senses related to will: the sense of balance, the sense of movement,
    • the sense of life, and the sense of touch.
    • what he experiences in his environment through sense-perception,
    • through all the twelve varieties of sense-perception that I have
    • out of the constitution of the senses and therefore of the human head.
    • the head-organisation — that is, from the nerve-senses
    • through living, to sense this contradiction, but our inner life is a



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