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Searching Rudolf Steiner Lectures by GA number (GA0207)
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    Query was: cosmos
  

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: Evil and the Power of Thought
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    • Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy Vol. I,
  • Title: Lecture: The Seeds of Future Worlds
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    • Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy Vol. I,
    • cosmos we have the crumbling away of matter in the moon, and in the sun
    • cosmos. You see the moon like this: first a circle, then a smaller,
    • falls to pieces; it is strewn out over the cosmos. In the moon,
    • our cosmos. Thus in the contrast between sun and moon we can see a
    • the cosmos. We must become aware of these two opposite activities in
    • the cosmos: the moon-nature directed towards pulverising and
    • its physical source in the Sun-nature of the cosmos. Moon-nature and
  • Title: Lecture: Human Freedom and Its Connection with the Mystery of Golgotha
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    • Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy Vol. I. It appears in the original German in
    • the volume entitled: Cosmosophy, Vol. I, and in the 5 lecture series
    • entitled, Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy. The translators are Alice Wulsin
    • Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy Vol. I.
    • Cosmosophy, Vol. I,
    • Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy. The translators are
    • he could still assert himself and view himself within the cosmos
    • end that which will once more make the whole cosmos appear in a
    • cosmos, where the Sun was shining. A true knowledge of the
  • Title: Fundamental Impulses in the Mysteries of Ancient and Modern Times
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    • entitled, Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy Volume I, published in German as,
    • Anthroposophy as Cosmosophy Volume I,
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture I
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  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture II
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • cosmos we have the crumbling away of matter
    • relationship in which we stand to the cosmos, and so one must
    • in the cosmos: the moon nature directed toward splintering
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture III
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  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture IV
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • cosmos.
    • entirely formed and fashioned out of the cosmos. As we have
    • us by the cosmos. Now, however, the soul element must enter
    • from the soul-spiritual world. Inasmuch as the cosmos weaves
    • picture of the cosmos is not only permeated by feelings and
    • cosmos. The longing to become world is achieved, and a
    • it were; it becomes world, it becomes cosmos. By reason of
    • spiritual-physical cosmos and begins in the Midnight Hour of
    • what we carry out of the spiritual cosmos into our bodily
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture V
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • universal cosmos, and what I have described as this web of
    • skin (red). This sense life is thus formed out of the cosmos,
    • man has received as a gift, as it were, from the cosmos when
    • receives as his organization out of the cosmos, however,
    • cosmos, which in fact we received through the cosmos —
    • cosmos. The will element thus lives in the inherited
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture VI
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • the cosmos and what as plant-like nature is imparted to the
    • being in his relationship to the cosmos we find that while
    • death a human being lives on into the cosmos, he becomes
    • — naturally out in the cosmos we cannot speak of
    • not speak of the cosmos in the sense of a cosmic law that
    • that which the cosmos has given us.
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture VII
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • because the earth is a complete planet in the cosmos. What is
    • through death works on earth, and also in the cosmos, upon
    • works on the plant realm both on earth and in the cosmos
    • brings with him out of the cosmos something that then
    • What he brings from the cosmos bears the same relationship to
    • say that the human being brings with him from the cosmos the
    • the cosmos through my perceptions, through my experiences. I
    • whole cosmos. His breathing becomes for him a symbol of
    • It is the same with the soul-spiritual: the whole cosmos is,
    • soul-spiritually and disperses itself in the cosmos until it
    • reaches the very periphery of the cosmos. Then it returns
    • cosmos, so that his future evolution may proceed in an
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture VIII
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • referred back to past ages of the cosmos. From my
    • of the cosmos, if we wish to understand in this way these
    • etheric cosmos, just as the physical body is dissolved into
    • plant. The cosmos thus absorbs our etheric body, as if
    • way in the cosmos out of human etheric bodies, however,
    • becomes in the cosmos forces of a future Jupiter realm of
    • cosmos. It vanishes from the human being; it lifts itself
    • away from him. For the cosmos it again appears to be nothing
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture IX
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  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture X
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • dissolves, as we have seen, in the cosmos at large,
    • itself into the far reaches of the cosmos. There is a brief
    • Then he lives into the cosmos with his pictures, and these
    • pictures become interwoven into the cosmos in the same way in
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture XI
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    • Cosmosophy, Volume I
    • find his own value and see himself within the cosmos as a
    • once more make the whole cosmos appear in a light that gives



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