[RSArchive Icon] Rudolf Steiner Archive Home  Version 2.5.4
 [ [Table of Contents] | Search ]


[Spacing]
Searching Rudolf Steiner Lectures by GA number (GA0207)
Matches

You may select a new search term and repeat your search. Searches are not case sensitive, and you can use regular expressions in your queries.


Enter your search term:
by: title, keyword, or context
   


   Query type: 
    Query was: knowledge
  

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: Evil and the Power of Thought
    Matching lines:
    • human knowledge; it was in no way orientated towards directing man's
    • entire being to it. It was cosmic knowledge that wove in the ancient
    • cultivating self-knowledge and a true inner vision. And simply
    • knowledge of the outer world and of the spiritual facts and beings
    • realise when an impression was produced by this self-knowledge on the
    • self-knowledge was to be approached. The precept I mean is frequently
    • knowledge of man. Tradition has preserved this precept, and to-day it
    • to begin with, the tradition of self-knowledge, but how, too, by
    • however, recover the knowledge of man that lived in the Mystery colonies
    • inner being? What does self-knowledge yield?” In raising such
    • self-knowledge is only the transformed outer world, which is
    • respect of matter. There is no human self-knowledge which does not
    • instincts only when a true knowledge of the human being once again
    • is a fact, and knowledge merely draws attention to it. If the centre
    • self-knowledge in the true way.
    • knowledge by saying: “You modern Westerners live entirely
    • it occurs in sleep and as it existed in fully conscious knowledge for the
  • Title: Lecture: The Seeds of Future Worlds
    Matching lines:
    • held — you will remember — that knowledge obtainable by
    • ordinary rational observation of the world includes knowledge
    • Christ, he wants to acknowledge Him — but through inner
    • within us. A man is not changed by knowledge: he merely comes to know
    • knowledge of it and so he gives no thought to it. He must grow into
    • this knowledge; must learn to have it in thought and remembrance.
    • with our intellectual scientific knowledge. And theologians such as
  • Title: Lecture: Human Freedom and Its Connection with the Mystery of Golgotha
    Matching lines:
    • a knowledge of the inner constitution of the human organism by
    • Fifteenth Century, through the form of knowledge which has arisen
    • and became inaccessible to man's direct knowledge, because he no
    • semblance enables us to develop a satisfactory knowledge of
    • with the aid of an instinctive knowledge. Today it is impossible
    • clergyman who believes that he may gain knowledge of the
    • that only a knowledge gained in freedom, a knowledge gained by
    • value, but the Gospel must be added to the direct knowledge of
    • point of issue will be the knowledge of the Mystery of Golgotha.
    • cosmos, where the Sun was shining. A true knowledge of the
    • realized fully and profoundly. This knowledge will not be
    • human being. It will be a knowledge which must be felt and
    • enabling us to see it, will ray out from our knowledge of the
  • Title: Fundamental Impulses in the Mysteries of Ancient and Modern Times
    Matching lines:
    • human knowledge did not as yet pervade the encompassing,
    • arising out of this old Oriental wisdom, was knowledge of
    • East had to face the necessity of man's knowledge of self, of a
    • shape of outer knowledge of the world, and knowledge concerning
    • what an impression this self-knowledge of manmade on these
    • gam knowledge of the secrets of man's inner being; it is not
    • East, could experience when he advanced to a knowledge of man
    • wisdom. This knowledge is taken up without being understood at
    • self-knowledge of man, but owing to his particular individual
    • man's knowledge of self used to be in the Mystery-colonies I
    • really contained in his inner being and what self-knowledge
    • What appears to a normal consciousness as self-knowledge, is
    • thoughtful Ego. There is no human self-knowledge that does not
    • for without this knowledge man will have illusions concerning
    • what goes on in him instinctively, if a real knowledge of man
    • man of the West; knowledge points it out. It is far worse,
    • conscious knowledge of this destructive centre and proceeds
    • of the Mysteries were led to self-knowledge in the right
    • knowledge if we wish to penetrate behind the sense-impressions.
    • in their knowledge.
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture I
    Matching lines:
    • permeated by this kind of human knowledge; it was in no way
    • cosmic knowledge that blossomed in the ancient Oriental
    • necessity of cultivating self-knowledge and a true inner
    • Asia, had acquired knowledge of the outer world —
    • knowledge of the spiritual facts and beings lying behind the
    • self-knowledge on the teachers and pupils of the Oriental
    • self-knowledge was actually to be approached. The saying to
    • the West, to knowledge of the human being. Tradition has
    • begin with, the tradition of self-knowledge, but how, by
    • however, recover the knowledge of the human being that lived
    • within my inner being? What does self-knowledge yield?”
    • consciousness of modern man as self-knowledge is only the
    • in relation to matter. There is no self-knowledge that does
    • flows into his instincts only when a true knowledge of the
    • a fact, and knowledge merely draws attention to it. If the
    • his knowledge by saying, “You modern Westerners live
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture II
    Matching lines:
    • atheistic materialist, one is not willing to acknowledge this
    • that knowledge obtainable by ordinary observation of the
    • world through ordinary human reason included knowledge of the
    • wants to acknowledge Him but through inner experience no
    • human being is not changed by knowledge: he merely comes to
    • he has no knowledge of it and therefore no awareness, no
    • knowledge, into such an awareness. When we learn to recognize
    • scientific knowledge. And theologians such as Adolph Harnack,
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture III
    Matching lines:
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture IV
    Matching lines:
    • Knowledge of the Higher Worlds and its Attainment,
    • vision the moment we can say from inner knowledge: the human
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture V
    Matching lines:
    • kind of self-knowledge, one actually finds in this mood
    • protests against a knowledge of the human being arise out of
    • wish to approach a true knowledge of the human being. Man
    • directly through one-sided natural scientific knowledge, he
    • him; it indeed goes on without his knowledge, but he can
    • must really come to the self-knowledge characterized. It is
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture VI
    Matching lines:
    • animal realm or even to self-knowledge. All this must be
    • ancient times who used to acquire knowledge from certain
    • sensed knowledge. It is tremendously moving when one finds
    • more to connect knowledge with the constellations of the sun,
    • increasing knowledge of the human being from his spiritual
    • real human knowledge; as man needs it, the primeval saying of
    • Self-knowledge
    • is knowledge of the world, and world knowledge is knowledge
    • sense, knowledge of man is knowledge of the world; knowledge
    • of the world is knowledge of man.
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture VII
    Matching lines:
    • yesterday's study with the words, “Knowledge of the
    • world is knowledge of man, and knowledge of man is knowledge
    • becomes filled with ideas that come from this knowledge, he
    • to an all-embracing knowledge of the world and of man in the
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture VIII
    Matching lines:
    • that knowledge of the human being is knowledge of the world.
    • human spirit. Knowledge of the world must become knowledge of
    • spirit. Knowledge of man becomes knowledge of the world in
    • be recognized in the present-day human being. Knowledge of
    • present-day man means world knowledge of the past. Knowledge
    • of the body of present-day man means world knowledge of the
    • possible points of view, world knowledge is knowledge of man.
    • seed-like nature of man's bodily present. Knowledge of man is
    • knowledge of the world, and knowledge of the world is
    • knowledge of man.
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture IX
    Matching lines:
    • adjusted to this outer knowledge. Even when we feel, then,
    • knowledge. Thus the human being, from the time he enters
    • we take completely seriously a knowledge such as we have
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture X
    Matching lines:
    • Insofar as he has absorbed this knowledge in pallid thoughts
    • through his knowledge. He lays this brief experience aside,
  • Title: Cosmosophy 1: Lecture XI
    Matching lines:
    • knowledge of the human organization by studying what is dead
    • inaccessible to direct human knowledge, because he no longer
    • develop a satisfactory knowledge of nature, particularly in
    • earth, through an instinctive knowledge.
    • freedom. He must freely acknowledge the Mystery of Golgotha.
    • gain knowledge of the Akashic Chronicle in a special
    • really grasped that only a knowledge gained in freedom, an
    • active knowledge, is able to lead us to Christ, to the
    • direct knowledge of the essence of the Mystery of Golgotha.
    • proceed from the knowledge of the Mystery of Golgotha. This
    • Christ of the outer world. The true knowledge of the Mystery
    • knowledge will not be abstract, not merely theoretical, but
    • one that fills the whole human being. It will be a knowledge
    • knowledge of the Mystery of Golgotha. If we but recognize



The Rudolf Steiner Archive is maintained by:
The e.Librarian: elibrarian@elib.com