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  • Title: Colour: Part One: Colour-Experience (Erlebnis)
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
    • more than all these, if must interest the artist, the painter. In a
    • When painting, we can introduce different colours into this greenness.
    • by bringing a little imagination into what we have painted before us.
    • the first place, and in it we paint red figures. Whether we give them
    • red faces and red skin, or whether we paint them entirely red, is
    • immaterial. In the first example we paint red figures; in the second,
    • flesh-colour — and on the third green surface we paint blue figures.
    • we wish to portray it exactly and to paint the true picture of the
    • meadow, we should not paint red figures standing quietly in it; they
    • painting. It is the image of the soul-nature, but it is not the soul
  • Title: Colour: Part One: The Luminous and Pictorial Nature of Colours
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
    • must seek it in another way, as follows: Imagine I paint here a black,
    • cannot of course paint that at the moment, but imagine these
    • to us if we paint a surface green and give is a circumscribed area.
    • imagine it, but it has something super-human. When Fra Angelico paints
    • paint an equal blue when he brings super-terrestrial things into the
    • is, the painter really responds to them, if he paints in accordance
    • and give the green a sharp outline; if he thinks: now I am painting
    • of radiation; and if he thinks when painting blue: I draw myself in,
    • I must also paint by giving the blue a kind of crust: then he lives in
    • his colour and paints in his picture what the soul really must want if
    • Hence the old painters who had a susceptibility to such things found
  • Title: Colour: Part One: The Phenomenon of Colour in Material Nature
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
    • painting-colours, their bodily composition, mixture, etc., if we want
    • to practice the art of colour which is painting. Here we are brought to
    • highest sense, for the Art of Painting. For in painting we practice
    • impression of something painted. So, if we want to raise the study of
    • the nature of colour to the plane of painting, we must be interested in
    • in the history of painting you will find that the great painters of
    • former ages paint people and human situations, but seldom paint
    • paint it. But that of course is only a superficial explanation, though
    • What lies behind it is different. Landscape painting arises really at
    • civilization and culture. You may say that landscape painting is in
    • him to comprehend the element necessary for painting nature in
    • that the old artists did not make this distinction in their painting.
    • will-nature of colour-luster. The old painters do not always take into
    • consideration when they carry their painting more into the spiritual;
    • but not when they paint the everyday world. Nor did they pay attention
    • example, by Titian. But in general we can say that the old painters do
    • image and give it in painting an image-character. But if you give
    • paint a landscape of plants.
    • Now suppose you want to paint a landscape of plant-life, and it is to
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  • Title: Colour: Part Two: Thought and Will as Light and Darkness
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
  • Title: Colour: Part Two: The Connection of the Natural with the Moral-Psychical. Living in Light and Weight.
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
  • Title: Colour: Part Two: Dimension, Number and Weight
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
    • doesn't bother. The painter will also not study this awful
    • Well, well, it doesn't matter very much if a painter has a true or a
    • of consciousness. In painting, what once was there, but then
    • disappeared, when one still painted by cosmic inspiration, because
    • weight did not yet exist, — this painting has left its last trace in,
    • let me say, Cimabue, and the Russian Icon-painting. The Icon was still
    • painted out of the macrocosm, the whole outer world. It was so to
    • paint the Icon with inner sympathy, not merely by tradition and
    • painting. It consisted in bringing out the human figure from the gold
    • the physical man, now one has no longer the universe. One can paint no
    • longer out of the gold; one is compelled to paint from the flesh.
    • This has gone so far that painting has practically reverted to what it
    • thing is, one cannot paint them any more today. But if they were to e
    • painted in their original form, they would have no weight at all.
    • Giotto was the first to begin painting objects so that they have
    • weight. From which it arose that everything one paints has weight,
    • even in the picture, and then one paints it from the outside, so that
    • the colours have a relation to what is painted, as the physicist
    • But Icons are no longer paintable at all, because man does not
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  • Title: Colour: Part Three: The Creative World of Colour
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
    • century, who was greatly gifted as draughtsman and painter, Carstens.
    • in Carstens lay a great gift for drawing, if not for painting. If we
    • ideas and embody them in paint, only he is not in the position in
    • men's souls, and surrounded them. When Raphael painted Madonnas, there
    • we study the effect of this or that colour from a painter's point of
    • figure from its natural repose. The moment you paint, let us say, a
    • painted into this world, something depicting the elementary powers of
    • modern Art: air and water and light, as they are painted today are
    • that he could thus become the painter of Madonnas, because they lived
    • time. This is what made him the true painter of Madonnas. Only if we
    • paint-brush. The obstacle to building this bridge today is the
    • time further into the nature of colour and of painting.
  • Title: Colour: Part Three: Artistic and Moral Experience
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
    • get an idea of a time when the preparation through which the painter
  • Title: Colour: Part Three: Colours as Revelations of the Psychic in the World
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic
    • presses on one as light and colour; one becomes a painter. The source
    • of painting is opened of its own accord by means of such a view. And
    • of colour, one becomes a painter, who paints with his inner soul, for
    • the luster of the psychic. When we paint a surface blue, we are
    • satisfied only if we paint it strong at the edged and weaker in the
    • produce the form out of the colour, that is, to paint out of the world
    • occur to use to paint the soul element in a picture otherwise than by
    • If you appreciate from this standpoint the painters of the
    • And, above all, there was present something else. In the painting
    • echoed in the Renaissance painting, there was that inner perspective
    • takes the object it represents into the distance. We paint
    • in the material element in space, wanted to paint in it also.
    • the natural element in painting. For the surface belongs also to the
    • materials of a painter, for he works upon it. But an artist must
    • fact that the painter's material is the surface. And the surface can
    • and indeed added something powerful to the old aesthetics of painting.
    • return to a more spiritual interpretation of painting also, so that we
  • Title: Colour: Part Three: The Hierarchies and the Nature of the Rainbow
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    • Steiner's insights into the nature of color, painting and artistic



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