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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture I
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    • introductory remarks to what I am going to lay before you in
    • the coming days. My reason for doing this is that you may
    • Course’. It is not meant to be that. But it will deal
    • with something that I feel is especially important for us to
    • explain what I actually intend with the giving of this
    • that in a comparatively short time much will have to be
    • changed within what we call the sphere of science, if it is
    • holds so firmly to such traditional classification that it is
    • on this basis that candidates are chosen to occupy the
    • field of science, things that today are dealt with in Zoology
    • them to find an approach to what they will urgently need in
    • been formed, almost, I might say, so that the various
    • essential. Therefore, what we term Spiritual Science, which
    • the world today, my dear friends, in a way that is really
    • world that becomes more and more abstract, less and less
    • connections with Astronomy, that is, with a true knowledge of
    • taken into account in other branches of science too, so that
    • thought to the field of Astronomy, that astronomical
    • today facts are referred to, which lie somewhat remote from
    • is usual to say: “That is stated, but no proved.”
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture II
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    • are widely separated. I sought to show that the science of
    • that Astronomy must be linked with Embryology. It is
    • that there must come about a regrouping of the sciences, for
    • lectures, that we can only understand the successive stages
    • If, however, one only accepts what is fashionable nowadays,
    • anything like what I said yesterday. For the evolution of our
    • time has brought it about that astronomical facts are only
    • embryological facts are recorded in such a way that in
    • considering where lies the origin of what, in embryonic
    • phenomena so entirely apart from man that they are tending
    • believed that natural phenomena only reveal their true
    • understanding of Nature through research that is completely
    • are proud that the apparently ‘objective’ facts
    • have shown that man is only a grain of dust upon an Earth
    • Sun in space. They are proud that one need pay no attention
    • Earth, — that one need only pay attention to what is
    • must pursue in these lectures. What you will find as proof
    • From what
    • today and how all that went before was childish — the
    • ‘Calendar-Science’. Much that appears to us today
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture III
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    • angles. Only quite unadvanced thinkers still maintain that
    • yet emphasize that it represents only a certain mode of
    • understanding, and that quite other syntheses might be
    • even those who say, somewhat as Ernst Mach used to say: In
    • this that the problematical nature of the celestial charts,
    • that goes on in Man, in order to find the way to what is
    • shall find that we are being led through Astronomy itself
    • into the views of Spiritual Science. Bear in mind that the
    • as it were, arrests with his senses whatever approaches him,
    • not come to a standstill before our senses. All that goes on
    • consciousness, all that lives in the celestial influences
    • that stream towards us from all sides, must be sought for
    • continue in a certain direction what we began yesterday. Only
    • that forces are there in the Earth by virtue of which it
    • brings forth the minerals; yet is is equally true that all
    • that is living in plants, animals and physical human beings
    • totality when we do not simply cast aside what lives in
    • The living beings and entities that grow up out of the Earth
    • Of all that
    • transition to what meets us in man. Whereas the mineral
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture IV
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    • linked on to relatively few observations. That is the one
    • thing, namely, that a start is made from observations out of
    • which certain ideas have been developed. The other is that,
    • mode of thought of modern Science there prevails what might
    • philosophandi’. It consists in saying: What has been
    • that breathing must have the same causes in man as in the
    • animal, or again, that the ignition of a piece of wood must
    • for example, that if a candle and the Sun are both of them
    • further thought that if this were not so, we should have no
    • guarantee that the causes of the shining of a candle and of
    • the shining of the Sun are one and the same? Or that in the
    • What I am now
    • fact. There is a continuous line of development from what the
    • his third Law, quoted yesterday — it must be said that
    • bear when, from the little that lay before him, he discovered
    • what is given. The development in this direction reaches a
    • Heavens”. In all that has followed in this trend we see
    • the thought pictures that have thus been conceived of the
    • noted that in the historical development of these theories we
    • abstraction from reality; to what extent it related to the
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture V
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    • that in the study of celestial phenomena, in so far as these
    • mathematical analysis; we can only admit that analysis and
    • significant conclusion that in reflecting on what we see,
    • imagine that we can do so by thinking of the Sun as moving in
    • such a way that its movement can be represented by a definite
    • geometry line, or that the Moon's movement can be so
    • the in the further course of these lectures, what must be put
    • into the positive, for it is most important that we clear our
    • hand, we saw yesterday that what confronts us in Embryology
    • point where we must recognize that the world is different
    • from what this process of cognition might at first have led
    • see that there must be something which preceeds the
    • of biogenetic law, which states, as you know, that the
    • that it was only necessary to take into account the forces
    • directly present in what takes place in the embryo itself.
    • Now the mechanical needs to be grasped in a way that is at
    • what goes before this has to be taken fro granted. We must
    • admit that we find something in the realm of reality, the
    • what we observe in terms of diagrams, formulas and
    • excluding man altogether from the picture. We shall see that
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture VI
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    • You will have seen, from what has been
    • said so far, that in the explanation of natural phenomena we
    • mathematical domain. That we do not dispute the justification
    • to show that what is looked for nowadays merely by gazing
    • be put on a far wider basis, so that not only a part but the
    • should be assuming that what goes on in the Universe beyond
    • what was going on within civilized mankind.
    • Scholasticism. During that age, deeply significant
    • one goes into them deeply enough, one feels that these
    • recall what then became a fundamental question in human
    • again, what it betokened in the spiritual development of
    • Europe that attempts were made to prove the existence of God.
    • Think what it means in the whole evolution of human
    • used in a rather different sense than today) declared that
    • concepts, — that in these concepts man in his inner
    • life takes hold of something real, — that they
    • thoroughgoing Realist. The Nominalists, he said, assert that
    • that the so-called ‘ontological’ proof of God's
    • thing, you do not want to prove it. But at that time
    • what a deep stirring and rumbling was going on in human
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture VII
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    • to translate what is really qualitative into quantitative
    • for instance under what conditions, if two sound-waves are
    • heard before the other. All that is necessary is the trifling
    • detail that we ourselves should be moving with a velocity
    • greater than that of sound. But anyone who thinks in keeping
    • cannot but do so. There is no sense whatever in formulating
    • again and again. The harm that is done by the wrong kinds of
    • should then be prepared, really to see what the phenomenal
    • this and from what was given yesterday, I must again
    • will see that they too are necessary for the building of a
    • true World-picture. I shall again refer to what was said
    • of what comes into being when we assimilate the
    • concepts: That of the sense-perception pure and simple, and
    • important to see without prejudice, what is the real
    • life by day, or all that is present in the field of our
    • consciousness in that we open our senses to the outer world
    • dream-life; the only thing that is added to it is the content
    • helps us realize that man's life of ideation — his
    • more, it is truer to the facts to say that through the eye, for
    • such. (Remember always that I am thinking of these processes
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture VIII
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    • in that we shall need these days too. Now I am also well
    • connection with this subject. Please prepare whatever
    • heretofore, bringing in what I would call the subtler aspects
    • on Earth. To begin with, we pointed out that as a rule the
    • Astronomy of our time only takes into account what is
    • idea of what the ‘real’ movements might be like.
    • of cognition used; first, what our senses when looking out
    • pointed out that this procedure can never lead to the
    • the reason that the mathematical method itself is
    • that we must adopt a different method. We have to take our
    • start not only from what man observes when he looks out into
    • said, will give us indications of what the real movements in
    • through the Ice-Ages. We saw that the special kind of
    • been developing in human nature what in the man of today is
    • dream-life. It is through sense-perception that our mental
    • the supposition, to help explain what is meant.)
    • What must it
    • will at any rate that we direct the vision of our eyes, and
    • that time, as we have seen, the power of ideation — the
    • dependent on all that was going on around him. Today we see
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture IX
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    • what is real.
    • relationship to it, all that we observe in the phenomena of
    • still have to establish in what way he is this image. If this
    • is what he is, we must first of all gain a clear
    • must know what a foreshortening means, and so on, in order to
    • to relate the picture to what it represents in reality, so,
    • today to bring before your souls what I might call
    • It may appear somewhat forced to keep
    • the heavens. But after all it is obvious that however
    • permeated with mathematical thoughts. What Astronomy
    • gain no true relationship to what Astronomy can say to us.
    • that to which we were led through the ratios of the periods
    • know what I am about to describe, I only want to elucidate
    • two foci A and B, and you know that it is a definition of the
    • ellipse that for any point M of the curve, the sum
    • It is characteristic of the ellipse, that the sum of the
    • You know that it has two branches. It is defined in that the
    • now ask: What is the curve of constant product?
    • that the two distances AM and BM multiplied together should
    • calculate the ordinates for each point that fulfills these
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture X
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    • processes of the head, the nervous system, or whatever you
    • try to explain these movements solely out of what can be
    • Earth's magnetism, that is, with the line of direction
    • that have been collected towards an explanation, into the
    • of the picture. This method encloses the phenomena, whatever
    • while the celestial phenomena are restricted to what is
    • Remember what
    • I drew your attention to the fact that the principle of
    • of the skull from that of the vertebrae. These investigations
    • such a way that the form which was inside and has now been
    • his head, and what works within, tending from within toward
    • factors, — that which works outward from an unknown
    • interior, as we will call it for the moment, and that which
    • works inward from without. The latter corresponds to all that
    • This line is in a way the place of origin of what works outward,
    • If you now think of what envelops the human skull, you have
    • what corresponds to the central line of the tubular bone. But
    • coincides, in fact, with that of the Earth's radius and
    • compare your feeling of self — that feeling of self
    • which is really based on the fact that in normal life you can
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XI
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    • head and that of the metabolic system including the limbs. As
    • assign the metabolic system to what is earthly, — what
    • the forming of the head to all that derives from the great
    • Sphere, — that sends its lines of influence, as it were
    • this difference, we must relate it, to begin with, to what
    • consciousness of our time departs from what the naive human
    • it to be generally realised that this World-picture does not
    • represent absolute reality. We can no longer maintain: What
    • true form of the underlying reality, while what the eye
    • still have a feeling that he at least gets nearer to a true
    • what the head-man ascertains, so to speak. We base it on the
    • have recourse to all that is knowable by man, of man. We
    • whatever can be known of man.
    • presuppose what we arrived at in former lectures — the
    • take our start from what meets the eye — from what is
    • ask, dear friends: What does the eye behold, what do we learn
    • in the picture with what is given by the whole structure of
    • as fixed stars. I shall no doubt be repeating what is
    • What then do
    • find that it no longer presents the same uniform picture, but
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XII
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    • today by pointing out that our studies hitherto have led us
    • contemplated, and in so doing we have divined that the
    • formation of man is in some way related to what finds
    • showed that wheresoever we may look in the human body, we
    • ribs and the adjoining vertebrae. True as it is then that in
    • less. We simply have to imagine that where the ribs are (the
    • drawing indicated those that are joined in front via the
    • attachment of the lower limbs to the pelvis. In all that
    • of it must be so imagined that in the one half
    • Further we must imagine that from this
    • purely and simply what is made manifest in the forming of
    • it not interesting that Mercury and Venus make their loops
    • their loop occurs when what the Sun is for man — so to
    • Jupiter and Mars to that in man which is little influenced by
    • way be related to what is brought about, amid the formative
    • principles of man, by the Sun — or by what underlies
    • to expression something that bears directly, not indirectly,
    • this line of thought and bear in mind that there is the
    • the form that comes to manifestation in these movements, and
    • must be when they are forming their loops, that is to say,
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XIII
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    • Sun as centre. He then assumes that the sphere of the fixed
    • immense that the circumference of the circle, described by
    • before the Christian era. We must therefore assume that among
    • and spiritual life in a certain region at that time,
    • remarkable that in the prevailing consciousness of men who
    • and was supplanted by that of Ptolemy? Till, with the rise of
    • (For you will readily believe that
    • what held good for Aristarchus, held good for many people of
    • and it is true to say that among those who were the
    • moreover described in such terms that we can scarcely
    • distinguish it from that of our own time.
    • all essentials we may aver that the Ptolemaic system held
    • good for the Fourth post-Atlantean Epoch and for that alone.
    • What is the
    • that Ptolemy and his followers go back again to the idea of
    • he lets the planet move, so that the true path of the
    • circling movements so as to understand the fact that the
    • ancients were not far behind us. That they assumed this queer
    • Of course the Copernican system is simpler, — that will
    • other? What is the real difference between these ways of
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XIV
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    • point to something that will naturally follow on the more
    • that in the last resort both the Ptolemaic system and that
    • way or another, what is observed. The Ptolemaic system and
    • mathematical or kindred figures what has in fact been
    • that in the scientific life and practice of our time what is
    • observed, what is perceivable, is taken far to easily, too
    • other things I have tried to show that the movements of
    • co-ordinated with what is formed in the living human body,
    • plant body, are so formed that if we recognise the
    • What is it due to? How does it come about? What prospect is
    • that underlies the Copernican world-system of today.
    • What are we
    • out a world-system? What do we do in the first place? We
    • be thus cautious in relating what you see in the outer world.
    • a drum with an aperture, and make the drum rotate so that I
    • follow that what appears to be a movement is really a
    • contemporaries: I look at three successive positions of what
    • I call a heavenly body, and assume what underlies them to be
    • the underlying hypothesis that it is always the same Moon.
    • (That may be right without question, with such a
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XV
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    • deal with some of the things that may be causing you
    • difficulty in understanding what we have done hitherto. I
    • forming of man and what appears in the celestial phenomena.
    • seen. For a true Science we must accept that there is this
    • of thinking, the phenomena themselves are such that we find
    • therefore take for granted that we shall ever be able to
    • Geometry, that is to say, within a rigid three-dimensional
    • We can and we should try to take seriously that 'memberment'
    • that belongs to it. The metabolic system too, and all that
    • you turn a glove inside-out, provided only that the
    • oriented inward towards the radial quality that runs right
    • have "flipped" it, so that the inner side opens outside, in
    • What
    • word. In that we go from one pole to the other, we must adopt
    • impossible to gain a just or adequate notion of what the
    • to what constitutes the middle, in a certain sense, — the
    • middle member of man's organization. This will be all that
    • Suppose then we begin with such an organ and seek what
    • only take this as a picture) — if you call to mind that the
    • what must be needful also when we wish to comprehend the
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XVI
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    • What we are
    • movement — what may perhaps be described as their
    • errors that are made in scientific life consist in this: they
    • acquire a feeling of the fact that you ought not to try and
    • answer are not yet achieved. I know that many people (present
    • tangible answers. What they are asking is in effect to be
    • of the ideas and concepts they already have. What if the real
    • existing ideas and concepts? In that case, theoretic talk
    • we have gained so far have shown that we must make careful
    • diverse are the forms of curves that arise in man himself
    • through the forces that build and form him. We ascertained
    • have to pass from what we thus discover in our own human
    • frame, to what is there outside in Universal Space, which
    • a rigid space, but that is mere appearance. As to this
    • real connection of what goes on in man himself and what goes
    • question: What relation is there, as to cognition itself,
    • between those movements that may legitimately be considered
    • relative and those that may not? We know that amid the
    • kinds: those that work radially and those which we must think
    • apprehend that element of movement which takes its course
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XVII
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    • foci, — call it what you will. I should therefore have
    • that I have been saying, — so for example when you are
    • figures of rotation. This also underlies what I have just
    • of our Earth in changes that go on in man himself. We human
    • to be real. This is the thing that matters.
    • out that in the processes of human metabolism we have an
    • That which takes place between the head and the rest of man
    • direction parallel to the surface of the Earth — that
    • that of plant growth, that it is not permissible to think of
    • give to man's vertical direction the opposite sign to that of
    • similar to that in the plant. Hence, my dear Friends, we only
    • vertical direction. We must imagine that while man no doubt
    • This then is what we have. (I say again, I can only indicate
    • light of empirical phenomena) In what we here see
    • for in the line that joins the two. Moreover, the line will
    • What I have
    • led to realize that Earth and Sun must be thought of as
    • substantial line of what this means if you recall what was
    • that work from within outward (fundamentally the same is true
    • what is going on the Sun's environment as we should see
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  • Title: Astronomy Course: Lecture XVIII
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    • what I said yesterday about the opposite character of Earth
    • and Sun, we shall perceive that in answering such questions
    • right way. We cannot form true ideas of what we see if we do
    • not recognize from the outset that radical differences may be
    • called for in the whole way we interpret what is seen in one
    • case and in another. The phenomena that present themselves to
    • there are many phenomena the characteristic of which is that
    • phenomena — or rather, phenomena that seem
    • as we have to imagine that if we went through and beneath the
    • shall we have to imagine that if we moved from outside the
    • truth if we imagine that as we go from the circumference
    • them all together will be obliged to recognize that this is
    • conceive that there is negative matter in the inner space of
    • it yesterday. The movement of Earth and Sun is such that the
    • perceive and understand what you would otherwise fall short
    • start from such ideas as these. You must imagine that in the
    • Matter itself, — that is, earthly matter — is
    • well conceive that there is also an imaginary [intensity]. You
    • take the connection of what I have been saying with man
    • that man is related to earthly matter, we may compare man's
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.



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