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  • Title: Lecture: Woman and Society (Die Frauenfrage)
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    • question regarding women. Of course, no one must imagine that
    • years ago, had imagined in theory.
    • this world-view when one believes it to be nothing but the imaginings
    • not mere imaginings or daydreams, but are things that are as certain
    • nature, then we must see something feminine — imagination
  • Title: Lecture: Problems of Nutrition
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    • condoned for its own sake. Although it is no doubt less damaging
    • this man there lives a spiritual counterpart, so also I can imagine
    • possible imagination and calls forth thinking. It is this activity
  • Title: Lecture: The Etherisation of the Blood
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    • manifestation of impulses of will, and it is easy to imagine that if
    • oneself up to such imaginings is like a dream making its way into
  • Title: Lecture: Overcoming Nervousness
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    • the etheric body and try to strengthen it. Imagine someone so dissipated
  • Title: Jesus and Christ
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    • Let us imagine someone who knows nothing whatsoever of the Gospels,
  • Title: Lecture: Newborn Might and Strength Everlasting
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    • deepest way how the medieval mind imagined the relationship between man's
    • is brought before the world so magically, uniting himself in his thirtieth
  • Title: Lecture: The Four Sacrifices of Christ
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    • was injurious. Just imagine how we could possibly develop ourselves in
  • Title: Lecture: Anthroposophy and Christianity
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    • on it. Imagine waking up some morning with no idea of where we've been
    • imaginations make their appearance. Images rise up, but they are
  • Title: Lecture: Christ in Relation to Lucifer and Ahriman
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    • Imagine, for example, an artistic portrayal of the Christ suggesting
    • as imaginative forms.
    • can imagine; the karma in the world takes its course in a different
    • with spiritually true ideas. For example, we can hardly imagine
    • remarks about Central European culture that one could imagine. The
  • Title: Lecture: Preparing for the Sixth Epoch
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    • brothers, as a breath of magic that we breathe in our working
    • imaginations. We follow the Christ until death. We follow Him not only
  • Title: Lecture: Outlooks for the Future
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    • against this fate, against this destiny. Imagine the tragedy of such a
    • science imagines that in future we shall see Christ in an etheric shape,
    • science imagines! But the people who speak in this way are fools; let us
  • Title: Lecture: Human Life in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • We might of course imagine that we could make ourselves insensitive to
    • to imagine that any other sources save scientific ones could be relied upon
    • future can be imagined than this, which we are being forcibly urged to
    • from extra-terrestrial space. Things otherwise unimaginable are revealed to
    • (Fechner, for instance), but does give imaginative descriptions of real
  • Title: Evil and the Future of Man
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    • pictorial, imaginative descriptions have been taken very little in
    • It would be altogether wrong to imagine that the forces which bring
    • Behold, the human being passes by us, and we shall not imagine that we
  • Title: Lecture: Social and Anti-Social Forces in the Human Being
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    • lifted to the plane of Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition — only
    • to others. Imagine that you have a $5 note in your pocket, and you
    • any interest in each other. Yet this ability to develop an imaginative
    • the education of children. For we can really develop this imaginative
    • shall be in a position to relate ourselves imaginatively to those whom
    • when I was ten years old? I will imagine myself entirely into the
    • imagination for meeting people in the present. On the other hand,
    • imagination directly. This objectifying of our earlier years is
  • Title: Lecture: Spiritual Emptiness and Social Life
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    • against the Roman order of life. Imaginative study of these things
    • imaginations of which conventional history has little to say. Then it
  • Title: Lecture: Social Understanding Through Spiritual Scientific Knowledge
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    • realms is the force of Imagination, the second capacity is the force of
    • their state of slumber and use for the acquisition of Imagination.
    • From this you will see that the forces of Imagination, Inspiration and
    • twenty-one. So the forces that live in Imagination, Inspiration and
    • somewhere behind or above this. If you imagine you simply have
    • in the world if you imagine that there are forces above this line,
    • subsensible as well as super-sensible forces. So we must imagine that
  • Title: Lecture: Soul and Spirit in the Human Physical Constitution
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    • Then we come to the three higher forms of knowledge: Imagination,
  • Title: Lecture: The Path to Freedom and Love and their Significance in World Events
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    • this world and can contemplate it. To imagine that we cannot
    • Imagine that you are living for a time purely in reflection as usually
    • "Moral Imagination." Moral Imagination rises
    • yielded by Imagination, Inspiration, Intuition.
  • Title: Lecture: Search for the New Isis, the Divine Sophia: The Quest for the Isis-Sophia
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    • clouds, representing a multitude of children. We can imagine the Virgin
    • earth. The ancient Egyptian sage imagines in a spirit-filled way how the
    • way they looked upon Osiris as the being of the sun, but they imagined this
    • imagine that our being of the sun, the Christ, who has passed through the
    • imagination, suited to our own times. An understanding must arise again of
    • imaginatively, as the Egyptians did. But we must find the right Isis
    • working there. Just as the Egyptians imagined Ahriman-Typhon working in
    • wish to truly understand the world, must imagine that Lucifer appears to
  • Title: Lecture: The Two Christmas Annunciations
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    • The Proclamations to the Magi and the Shepherds
    • imagine this thinking and perceiving, in fact, all use of the inner
    • also recognise as such the Three Magi from the East, who are pictured
    • birth, while, on the other, the Three Magi from the East developed a
    • men as the Magi may be counted among the last remaining disciples of
    • preserved in its last fragments to the Magi, made possible the one
    • external science, the annunciation experienced by the Magi.
    • took place in the world of men became direct imaginative perception,
    • an instinctive, imaginative picture-perception. Thus, through inner
    • of this science announcement was made to the Magi of the Mystery of
    • annunciation came to the three Magi.
    • These are the two absolute contrasts: the Magi with their knowledge of
    • Magi? It has become our mathematics, with its knowledge of the
    • heavens! The Magi possessed a super-earthly science based on sublime
    • metamorphosis of what the Magi once possessed.
    • astronomy, are the offspring of the wisdom of the Magi.
    • The wisdom of the Magi too has become dry mathematics, perceiving the
    • from this standpoint. — The Magi had a
    • intensified as imaginative vision. Then there is born from out our
    • the Magi, there is a human element common to all men. For the earth is
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  • Title: Lecture: The Threshold In Nature and In Man
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    • character now lives in the soul as “imaginative” consciousness.
    • The moment man gives himself up to this imaginative consciousness,
    • it must grow into Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition. And this
    • At this Threshold we shall no longer let our imagination run away with
  • Title: Lecture: The Alphabet
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    • of the consonants. If you imagine the vowel A to be placed in here
    • When you say ‘I’, what is that exactly? Now just imagine someone had
    • all imagined atomistically. The original idea was organic. There the
  • Title: Lecture: Truth Beauty and Goodness
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    • or “Notary,” and then imagines he is of importance when convention
  • Title: Lecture: Self Knowledge and the Christ Experience
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    • development. But in progressing from his kind of imaginative, natural
    • free will. Through such a higher consciousness — imaginative, inspired
  • Title: Lecture: Polarities in Health, Illness and Therapy
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    • It could indeed be said that the greatest progress imaginable in medicine
    • years ago. Although it is generally imagined that it is easy for spiritual
    • Imagine now that the activity actually inherent in the human digestive
  • Title: Lecture: Man As A Picture of The Living Spirit
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    • clearly. Let us imagine ourselves asleep. The Ego is away from the
    • imaginable part in our lives. What we are conscious of, is after all
  • Title: The Individuality of Elias, John, Raphael, Novalis
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    • magical. The foundation is laid for his magic idealism in the experience he
    • poetry his magic idealism. He would fain not let himself be touched by Earth
    • this, through the magic idealism that lives in the soul of Novalis, appears
    • material thing — with the magic idealism of his poetry he can make it live
  • Title: Lecture: Exoteric and Esoteric Christianity
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    • Imagine two esoteric disciples of the Christ, who progress more and
    • more in the acquisition of an esoteric Christianity, and imagine them
    • possibly imagine that what had taken place according to a righteous
  • Title: Mathematics and Occultism
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    • can be imagined ... The prototype of the plant (Urpflanze)
  • Title: The Dead Are With Us
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    • imagine that their number is small, for individual human beings have
  • Title: Lecture: The Origin of Speech and Language
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    • imagine that a child prefers to do everything with the right hand.
    • you only need to imagine that we have the habit of making certain
    • assume the following, gentlemen: Let's imagine the earth and people
    • that may have taken place. Imagine that we have high mountains and a
    • at the earth and imagine that we put a chair out there into space and
    • imagination and not in reality. When we look from our chair in space
  • Title: Lecture: The Sense-Organs and Aesthetic Experience
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    • imaginative way of looking at things that was characteristic of Old
    • imaginative process comes about in the region behind your tongue
    • clear by an example. Imagine a tree-trunk lying there before you, and
    • expressed, still more concretely, in Imaginations that came from the
    • compared with the Greek Imagination of Aphrodite, Aphrogenea, the
    • imaginative rendering of the aesthetic situation of mankind, and
    • ocean. We need to add to it another Imagination which enters still
  • Title: Lecture: A Turning-Point in Modern History
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    • live on in humanity in a way quite different from the way imagined by
    • philosophical way, by Goethe in an imaginative and artistic way, is
  • Title: Lecture: Man, Offspring of the World of Stars
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    • striving should be to unfold real vision, to attain Imagination. If
    • trying to replace shadowy intellectualism by real Imagination. In the
    • not the only forces at work in his organism. To imagine such a thing,
  • Title: Lecture: The Ear
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    • can imagine, there inside the ear there lies a human being, whose head
    • world of consonants is earthly; and if we could imagine a language
    • Thinking (for it is only prejudice to imagine that thought on the
    • the whole man. Already when we arise to Imaginative cognition we must
    • you reach Imaginative cognition. Or suppose you are so constituted
    • Imagination is quickly lost. It is fleeting, it disappears quickly. It
    • ordinary effort to bring it to Imagination — is certain to have
    • the Imaginative thinking with the ordinary thinking. Then we can
    • You see, therefore, that Imaginative thinking is already related to
    • Imaginative Knowledge. With the higher forms of Knowledge it is still
    • most an echo of it. And in Imaginative cognition, gradually, the
    • signifies the same for the Imaginative realm as the spatial element
    • that remains. He who arises to Imaginative knowledge gradually learns
    • Imaginative Cognition, what we perceive in seership, falls away and
  • Title: Education for Adolescents
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    • age, verve which above all is directed towards imagination; for
    • judgment is actually borne out of the powers of imagination. And if
    • deal with the intellect with a certain imagination, then you have
    • Young people demand imaginative powers; you must approach them with
    • first half of this life-period. The most damaging judgment for the
  • Title: Lecture: The Work of Secret Societies in the World
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    • will develop every imaginable skill and subtlety in the manipulation and
  • Title: Lecture: The Three Stages of Sleep
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    • when, through what I have often described as Imaginative
    • Imaginative consciousness within the forces of the soul which
    • only in the intermediate conditions. Imaginative consciousness,
    • during sleep. Imaginative consciousness is only able to behold
    • surging, weaving thought-pictures, the cosmic Imaginations
    • imagine that the following experiment may be made. You lie down
    • possible in the ordinary way but we will imagine it to be so
  • Title: Christ and the Twentieth Century
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    • abstraction, nothing but a piece of daring imagination. We, as human
    • by the social imagination of man. According to the most modern
    • historical research the Christ has become an imaginary God. To put it
    • superficiality imaginable. Ideas are not the source of development of
  • Title: Lecture: Richard Wagner and Mysticism
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    • divest these ancient legends of the magic dew upon them.
    • world of phantasy and imagination. Gold represents the remaining
  • Title: Lecture: Spiritual Wisdom in the Early Christian Centuries
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    • difficult to imagine that anyone capable of writing such absurdities
    • times gave their message in pictures and imaginations, Plato was one
    • of the first to change these imaginations into abstract concepts and
    • of imaginations. In Plato, the imaginations were already concepts
  • Title: Lecture: The Weaving and Living Activity of the Human Etheric Bodies
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    • etheric body to man’s physical body and imagine that a certain
    • cannot be made. Imagine the following experiment and that you see it
    • being enacted; imagine that the whole physical body of man can be
    • foundation of this statement ... but just imagine what the learned
    • If you now imagine
    • unable to see his activities. It is quite possible, to imagine this!
    • Imagine a gigantic
    • Just imagine how
    • world. The most practical thing is not at all as imagined by those
    • as to be tempted by a real serpent. Imagine, a real serpent creeping
    • Lucifer should be imagined as spiritual science is able to represent
    • him. Imagine now that man carries upon him his head, as the most
    • cord, that may be imagined in the form of a serpent’s body.
    • would we be with our physical body without any air! We imagine that
    • it, nor to judge it; it is not so simple a matter as imagined by
  • Title: Lecture: And The Temple Becomes Man
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    • subject. Imagine a human being lying on the ground, in the act of
    • can scarcely imagine anything more horrible than to be surrounded in
  • Title: Lecture: The Migrations of the Races
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    • earlier times had practiced magic. From here came the teachings of the
    • intent upon employing the outer accomplishments of the age of magic in
    • revival, in a new form, of the ancient magical achievements.
  • Title: Lecture: The Mystery of Golgotha
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    • however strangely seeming. Imagine some Being descending from another
    • are apt to imagine the past history of mankind far too similar to the
    • in dreamlike Imaginations. In a dreamlike way he saw the whole
    • Universe filled with spiritual pictures or Imaginations, and as he
    • Men of the East — the three Kings or Magi — we see the
  • Title: Lecture: The Recovery of the Living Source of Speech
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    • mockery for modern man to imagine he can understand anything of the
    • speech, but to Imagination. And language becomes the language
    • Imagination? There is no Hierarchy beyond the First! The Imaginations
    • obliged to turn to the past for Imaginations, to find in the
    • what the Imaginations are. What came from an earlier time had to be
    • the possibility of forming Imaginations from above. Consequently Man
    • Archangels lost the possibility of forming Imaginations from the
    • Impulse right into the Imaginations of the Archangels, and these
    • — from Intuition to Inspiration and to Imagination. We
  • Title: Lecture: Gnostic Doctrines and Supersensible Influences in Europe
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    • magical arts in the regions of Northern Asia. The magic arts
    • earthly magic. The forces living in the Pleroma were dragged down to
    • through the centuries to our own day, an Ahrimanic form of magic
    • Ahrimanic beings who practise an earthly, materialised form of magic.
    • magic. And Westwards of this wall, the urge towards rationalistic
    • existence had been made possible by the decadent magic arts practised
    • provided by magic arts which are the debased, materialised form of
    • Eastern magic and on the other, the forces emanating from the
    • made to consummate a union between a certain form of magic and
    • the sphere of Imaginative knowledge that we can stand with full
  • Title: Lecture: The Influence of the Dead on the Life of Man on Earth
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    • perceive Imaginatively — we realise that this world is peopled
    • ourselves only in our liquid part, Imaginative experiences can
    • our knowing by Imaginative perception all that surrounds us as the
    • elemental world. Imaginative perception will surely return to mankind
    • even as it has been lost. Only the old Imaginative clairvoyance which
    • fully conscious Imaginative seership. By a perfectly normal and
    • understood. For people keep on imagining that they are Christian
    • understanding of these things. I said, people only imagine that they
    • by Imaginative cognition. In it are a multitude of beings whom we may
    • imagine that this, the second body which we lay aside, is at all
    • Imaginatively.
    • receptive, when he has acquired the elemental or Imaginative power of
    • death. One who has attained Imaginative perception will be aware of
    • to measure and number. One should imagine that this delicate
    • they have laid aside, works upon our Imaginative cognition. That
  • Title: Lecture I: Ancient Myths
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    • through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
    • feature in the Jewish teaching. You could not possibly imagine that
    • ancient times when human beings could have Imaginations in a
    • remained for some few, but the authority of the Imaginations, that
    • disappeared: the beings who can still have real Imaginations, these
    • their Gods: there were Beings who could imagine. But the time
    • is past when such Beings as can ‘imagine’, can enter into
    • human bodies. For human bodies are no longer adapted to Imaginations.
    • who can have Imaginations, while we no longer can have them. The
    • atavistic clairvoyance in Intuition, Inspiration, Imagination; now we
    • upon it, they have remained in their imaginative consciousness,
    • imaginative consciousness. In this way, however, they rule over us,
    • for they have more power, as it were, since the Imaginative concept,
    • at the Imagination stage — this developed in the Greek
    • behind at Imagination, Rhea and Chronos at Inspiration, Gaea and
    • Inspiration; and those living in the Imaginative consciousness set
    • the Inspiring, the Inspiring through the Imagining. We live as human
    • beings and above us the Imaginings. Now you know that in the
    • instrument against the Imagining.
    • Imagination
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  • Title: Lecture II: Ancient Myths
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    • through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
    • certain mythical pictures and imaginations what they thought and felt
    • consciousness in fact expressed in imaginative myths facts about
    • super-sensible worlds and have still preserved life in the imaginative
    • Imaginations was the age when Osiris wandered upon Earth. They meant
    • been a time in which men on earth lived in Imaginations. And this
    • type of human soul which was able to live in Imaginations was
    • this life-in-Imaginations. Osiris has been killed by his brother
    • evolve the Imaginative faculties. The ancient clairvoyance exists no
    • point to a quite definite heavenly constellation, which the Magi
    • certain constellation of the ‘Virgin’ the Magi of the
    • Imaginations vanished when the setting sun in autumn stood in
    • up to recent centuries with Imaginative clairvoyance, but the
    • point is to show when Imaginative clairvoyance disappeared from earth
    • ages when Imaginative clairvoyance prevailed on earth conditions
    • them. Imagine to yourselves such pictures, but in a far more perfect
    • form, as signs — such signs then are images of Imaginations.
    • is really a reproduction of Imaginations only belonged to
    • ancients knew: this imaginative way of writing existed in the age of
    • Imaginations, the ancient picture-script disappeared and there arose
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  • Title: Lecture III: Ancient Myths
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    • through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
    • his atavistic imaginations. That was the age in which Osiris ruled.
    • Imaginations as have been brought before you, and to work over these
    • Imaginations as Imaginations. It is very important for the new Isis,
    • imaginable. We saw yesterday to what it must be related. The
    • Imaginative life drew out of the spirit, as we described yesterday.
    • human evolution resulted in the Imaginative atavistic clairvoyance.
    • Imaginative times, Osiris times, the spirit kept the human soul in a
  • Title: Lecture IV: Ancient Myths
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    • through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
    • growth and thriving, of everything imaginable, so, in the first
  • Title: Lecture V: Ancient Myths
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    • through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
  • Title: Lecture VI: Ancient Myths
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    • through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
    • the full truth, in a fatal accident. Imagine that a person is struck
    • imagine having such an opinion of the world of the stars. They looked
    • was not imagined. But for a certain length of time, in order to
    • Imagine if that were
  • Title: Lecture VII: Ancient Myths
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    • through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
    • next year and could not imagine how that lad Zeller, the
    • once. Just imagine if a modern man had the idea of learning
    • supposed to please the audience! Just imagine such stupid nonsense
  • Title: Lecture: The Souls Progress through Repeated Earth Lives
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    • we must imagine that the human being, as he appears when he is born
    • mental pictures is something much more complicated than is imagined
    • different from what one imagines, usually makes it possible to see
    • human life. You must not imagine that history, for example, ought to
  • Title: Lecture: The Forming of Destiny in Sleeping and Waking
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    • Imagine you are considering, not this present life, but the third
  • Title: Lecture: Goethe and the Evolution of Consciousness
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    • Greek culture as still remain extant, if we imagine that the Greeks
    • languages. Can you imagine a young Greek being expected to learn the
    • pure magic in those days. Any history of physics tells us as much.
    • meant, namely, the Imaginative element of speech, the instinctively
    • Imaginative element which precedes the word. And when he possesses
    • this faculty of instinctive Imagination man can perceive in outer
    • moulded by Imagination. Man can have a living experience of the
    • sentence to sentence in the imaginative shaping of speech, we grasp
    • filled with Imaginative instinct, prone by its very nature to
    • Those who imagine that a child personifies the table as a living
    • new way of viewing the world around us. Those who imagine that the
  • Title: Lecture: On the Reality of Higher Worlds
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    • point is reached where the advance is made to Imaginative
    • Thinking, Imagination.
    • I have called this development ‘Imaginative Thinking’
    • in very truth, to think in pictures, in Imaginations.
    • But one point must be quite clear. In this Imaginative Thinking we
    • Imaginative Thinking is gradually brought home to us, however,
    • In striving for Imaginative Knowledge we again become aware of this
    • illusions, visionary experiences or hallucinations in our Imaginative
    • sense-experience. Imaginative Knowledge, on the contrary, lies in a
    • Because Imaginative Knowledge is attained in full and free
    • our organism since the beginning of earthly life. The Imagination
    • stage of Imaginative Thinking, through which, to begin with, the
    • Through Imaginative Cognition we have learnt to know the ether-body,
    • Imagination and Inspiration?
    • With Imagination and Inspiration we comprehend not merely what has
    • Through Imagination and Inspiration a man reaches his innermost Self.
    • Imagination, must flow outwards, into what is objective. Thinking,
    • A man who has achieved Inspiration and Imagination however, has been
    • Inspiration and Imagination. I have called this still higher form of
    • As we have heard, Imaginative Knowledge reveals the ether-body, the
  • Title: Lecture: The Remedy for Our Diseased Civilisation
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    • standpoint, what takes place in that case. Imagine a Moleshott, or a
  • Title: Lecture: The Etheric Body as a Reflexion of the Universe
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    • physical-corporeal part; but let us now imagine a sleeping human
    • Just as the earth thinks through the physical body, so it “imagines”
    • (you know what imaginative knowledge is) — it imagines all that
    • from out the cosmos. The earth imagines this through the etheric
    • body the imagination of that part of the universe which belongs, to
    • heavenly forces of imagination are transformed into life-forces
    • glistens and shines inwardly, because it is so full of imaginations
    • imagine the following: On various occasions we had to emphasize the
    • already explained to you how wonderful are the imaginative forms
  • Title: Lecture: Salt, Mercury, Sulphur
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    • he experienced as imaginations, as dreamlike imaginations, were forms
  • Title: Lecture: Some Conditions for Understanding Supersensible Experiences
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    • the artist's imagination unfolds freely and independently of
    • Magister Artium Liberalium, is a very characteristic example.
  • Title: Lecture: The Ego-consciousness of the So-called Dead
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    • grasped through imaginative knowledge owing to its super-sensible
    • character, but as far as imaginative knowledge is concerned, it can
    • everything you can at all imagine in the environment of the earth,
    • including the planets and the fixed stars, if you imagine this in the
    • physical body, from out [of] all the super-sensible forces. Imagine that
    • life-experiences now rise up in the form of imaginations. We can only
    • experienced something through him. Imagine that this memory now rises
    • take an example: Imagine — this applies, both to good and to
    • evil action: Imagine that you say something bad to another person and
    • Now imagine the
    • best of all if you imagine it in the following way: Ask any one of
    • be imagined in such a way that we approach them, as it were, in an
    • INNER BEING and we must now build up the image, the imagination,
    • ourselves. The imaginative element, what we can look upon, this we
    • experiences after death if you imagine that you do not see it, but
    • Imagine what it
    • spiritual world through these deaths of self-sacrifice! Imagine what
  • Title: Lecture: Concerning the Origin and Nature of the Finnish Nation
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    • Let us now imagine that in the
  • Title: Lecture: Perceiving and Remembering
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    • active magical powers as regards all that is believed by people throughout
    • which work dreadful magic in the masses of mankind today. Naturally there are
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 1: Forgetting
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    • far more deeply illuminating than people usually imagine.
    • between a plant and a human being. Imagine planting a seed in the
    • the development of soul and spiritual qualities. If you imagine two
    • regard to ability and external characteristics, and then imagine that
    • he has been exposed to an unsuitable climate. Now let us imagine that
    • in our memory and after we have forgotten it. So let us imagine a
    • has its origin in the etheric body. Let us imagine a person who has a
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 2: Different Types of Illness
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    • perhaps what you are imagining is that if it is necessary to send a
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 3: Original Sin
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    • Just imagine how infinitely dull human life would be if people were
    • Imagine
    • generally imagined that the one who is listening is doing nothing.
    • respect. If you imagine this last remains of man's participation with
    • Imagine
    • situation vividly: Just imagine, in those times man was fructified
    • divine-spiritual environment. Imagine that you have a being
    • expresses will be the environment. Imagine, though, that he shuts
    • the physical body obeying the influences of the astral body. Imagine
    • hardened, independent being, subject to its own laws. Imagine what
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 4: Rhythm in the Bodies of Man
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    • imagine the ego as it is nowadays, in the waking state, we have to
    • all-embracing way. If you want to imagine it pictorially, you can
    • symbol of which we can imagine as a circle, as a hand of a clock
    • changes too in such a way that we can imagine it symbolically as
    • man's being. If you like, you can imagine each of the four rhythms as
    • corresponds roughly to the course of the year. You can imagine an
    • If we imagine that he always turns his face to the sun, then in the
    • course of seven days. Imagine how illnesses are connected with
    • imagine this temperature occurring with pneumonia. The lungs have
    • not imagine that these rhythms have never been clearly recognised. We
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 5: Rhythms in the Being of Man
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    • body’ is the most complicated matter imaginable, for the human
    • etheric body. Imagine that your astral body, that is connected the
    • the cycle behind the original one. Now imagine you have a case of the
    • about. Just imagine someone fancying that he could not bear the two
    • not imagine though, that all this is being said to encourage a world
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 6: Illness and Karma
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    • then onwards. This is difficult to imagine, as we are so very
    • Kamaloca for his future by imagining that the man who died at forty
    • and so on. You must certainly not imagine that we can immediately put
    • What men often imagine to be the reason for their discontent is
    • make this especially clear, let us imagine that a soul is not yet
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 7: Laughing and Weeping
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    • should not imagine that when a man is born it is possible under
    • a little imagination to find the reasons why this must be so.
    • it could find no outlet for the individual work of the ego. Imagine
    • the ability to portray the gods with real imagination, they portrayed
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 8: The Manifestation of the Ego in the Different Races of Men
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    • had the kind of physical body like you can imagine if you picture man
    • belonged to the regions of air and water, whereby we must imagine the
    • surroundings, because they look so similar. You can imagine such a
    • Just imagine, if you care to assume such a hypothesis, that the moon
    • the greatest imaginable degree. A great number of people looked up to
    • within us speak, or by imagining that each individual carries his own
  • Title: Being of Man/Future Evolution: Lecture 9: Evolution, Involution and Creation out of Nothingness
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    • Imagine holding the seed; there you have a minute structure. When you
    • us take a further example. Imagine a man standing here at a certain
    • higher the level at which man is. Imagine a dog standing in front of
    • imagine a genius like Goethe; he would see even more, and he would
    • analogy. Imagine you are sitting in a carriage that has been given or
    • fourth wheels, and so on, until you can easily imagine that one day
    • overwhelming suggestive power. Let us try to imagine how different a
  • Title: Between Death and Rebirth: Lecture One
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    • move from one Imagination to another, one Inspiration to another, one
    • may be called the ‘Imaginative’ life, or life filled with
    • world we are surrounded by ‘Imaginations’ — which
    • these Imaginations or visions, when they are true in the spiritual
    • body under such circumstances can be imagined.
  • Title: Between Death and Rebirth: Lecture Two
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    • continually damaging our bodily sheath. With the forces that are
  • Title: Between Death and Rebirth: Lecture Four
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    • condition between death and rebirth than is usually imagined.
    • we do today. It would be quite erroneous to imagine that when a
    • could actually perceive. But it would be childish to imagine that
  • Title: Between Death and Rebirth: Lecture Seven
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    • men of less eminence imagine that they have understood this, they
  • Title: Christ and the Spiritual World: Lecture One
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    • everything outside; let us imagine that no report of the Mystery of
    • One can easily imagine the smile that comes to a Monist,
    • built up the Gnosis out of childishness — they imagined all
  • Title: Christ and the Spiritual World: Lecture Two
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    • the Bible as the three Magi, who come from the East and are the
    • understanding was present, since these three Magi do at least appear
    • with regard to the three Magi. For does it not wish to say that here
    • stage of Sibyllism. Imagine this developing on its own lines in the
  • Title: Christ and the Spiritual World: Lecture Three
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    • dragon. And the Greeks imagined Apollo as shooting his arrows at the
    • Pythia, and how the Greeks imagined that Apollo lived in these
  • Title: Christ and the Spiritual World: Lecture Four
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    • least as volcanic. It is not the Sinai generally imagined; the Earth
    • They imagine that things said by writers in the past were as
  • Title: Christ and the Spiritual World: Lecture Five
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    • me, not as a vision but as a true Imagination from the spiritual
  • Title: Christ and the Spiritual World: Lecture Six
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    • imagination; it has movement, certain illnesses, and ebb and flow are
    • drink. The earth has a formative power, a kind of imagination; it has
  • Title: Perception of the Nature of Thought
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    • Modern man can hardly imagine
  • Title: Lecture: On the Connection of the Living and the Dead
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    • as ‘imaginations.’ Hence we may also call it the
    • ‘imaginative world.’ In ordinary human life, under
    • imaginative perceptions — his perceptions of the elemental
    • world. Not that the imaginations are not there, or that in any given
    • elemental world, receiving imaginations from it. On the contrary,
    • imaginations are perpetually ebbing and flowing in us. Though we are
    • giving rise to imaginations — in this case, in our etheric
    • body. Imaginations differ from ordinary thought in this respect. In
    • imaginations, on the other hand, we partake with almost the whole of
    • refer to them as unconscious imaginations, since it is only for an
    • intimately with our imaginations than with our sense-perceptions.
    • kingdom, as physical human beings, we receive few imaginations. We
    • what lives as imaginations in our etheric body is due to our
    • is fundamentally based on imaginations. Imaginations always result
    • ordinary consciousness they do not appear as imaginations,
    • this or that human being. All this is due to the imaginations which
    • these enhanced memories or imaginations which we have received from
    • we did not unfold this imaginative life by living together with other
    • imaginations hither and thither. We live with these imaginations and
    • call forth in us imaginations — conscious or unconscious. We
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  • Title: Lecture: The Moment of Death and the Period Thereafter
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    • man's etheric body can only be grasped through imaginative knowledge
    • owing to its super-sensible character; but as far as imaginative
    • If you now think of everything you can at all imagine in
    • stars, if you imagine this in the most spiritual form, this
    • super-sensible forces. Imagine that all the constructive forces that
    • now rise up in the form of imaginations. We can only say that we now
    • through him. Imagine that this memory now rises up before you, but
    • Imagine — this applies both to good and to evil thoughts and
    • Imagine that you say something bad to another person and that your
    • Now imagine the following. After our death, when we
    • You will grasp it best of all if you imagine it in the
    • crossed the portal of death before us should, however, be imagined
    • inner being, and we must now build up the image, the imagination,
    • ourselves. The imaginative element, what we can look upon, this we
    • experiences after death if you imagine that you do not see it all,
    • Imagine what it would mean if spiritual science were to
    • self-sacrifice! Imagine what this would mean! In that case, all
  • Title: Lecture: Relationships Between the Living and the Dead
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    • But now imagine such a small experience increased into a
    • in which we should imagine the dead, only by taking all that
    • imagine a human being who is striving to carry out the following soul
    • objective world. We see, as it were, in the form of imaginations,
    • impressions of the spiritual world — these are Imaginations of
    • imagined as an astral form — the head to some extent still
    • turning around like a serpent. Imagine this projected objectively —
    • he would have to imagine the Serpent coiled around the Tree with a
    • lead to an inner truth in the picture. Imagine to yourself that you
    • or not. Such a connection is quite imaginary, when we look at
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 1
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    • which we can imagine at present, is that man will spiritualize that
    • on the bed and floats as it were outside them. Now imagine a man in
    • imagine that these Folk-spirits are individually different, as are
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 2
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    • etheric body and folk's etheric body and imagine further that
    • world. Those who imagine that in the higher worlds they can manage
    • Spirit of the Age, works in a variety of ways. Just imagine what
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 3
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    • these three angles or only imagine them, if you experience from
    • need not go outside yourself. You may imagine for one moment, that
    • enters into man through the outer senses. Imagine the external world
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 4
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    • consequences. Just imagine for a moment that this had not occurred.
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 5
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    • may therefore imagine that these Spirits of Form, dancing as it were
    • have the weakest forces, so to say. Just imagine for a moment, what
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 6
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    • As you may imagine, it is a very complicated matter, when the Spirits of
    • imagine that a certain sun-force, which streams towards us in the
    • You must therefore imagine the Spirits of Form radiating
    • Mars-spirits work towards them, so in another case we must imagine
    • the West, in their stages of higher cognition, in imagination,
    • Imagine what is felt in the heart when two such men
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 7
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    • synthetic thought is the greatest imaginable in the Kabbalistic
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 8
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    • Hœnir who gave the imaginative faculty, and Lœdur who gave that
    • depicted in pictures of imaginative form, events for which we, in our
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 9
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    • of their own ‘ I ’, the imaginative picture of
    • clearness, are made at almost every step. Imagine the case of a man
    • imaginative Scandinavian sees these facts in pictures; and perhaps I
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 10
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    • existence of, not an imaginary, but a spiritually real Indian
  • Title: Mission of Folk-Souls (1929): Lecture 11
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    • imaginative form is wonderfully connected with everything we can
  • Title: Lecture: A Picture of Earth-Evolution in the Future
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    • being given to him in the form of new Imaginations, in which cosmic existence
    • which are — well — thoughts and nothing more. But try to imagine what will
    • has not allowed itself to be quickened by the new form of Imaginative Knowledge
    • how that which modern physics, with its unimaginative charts, casts down into
    • who imagine that they will gain their ends by promoting their own spiritual development
    • earth. Nevertheless, in the picture of this valley of death in Nietzsche's imagination
  • Title: Mission of Spiritual Science and of Its Building at Dornach
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    • misunderstandings. Opinions such as, “It is mere imagination; it
    • Anthroposophy be confused, let us say, with alchemy, with the magic of
    • Imagine that the statue
    • — imagine that the statue, which previously stood there with its
    • meant not something merely imagined, but it is meant that man, by
    • fundamental essence, nothing magical or mystical in a bad sense is
    • Because we gain a knowledge of nature, we shall not imagine that we are
    • conditions, shall we imagine that we are able to create something in
    • might perhaps try to imagine another chimney, as chimneys are now
  • Title: Lecture: The Spiritual Communion of Mankind
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    • mirror reality, through the very nature of the Imaginations of the
    • But it must not be imagined that
    • Sun which revealed a very great deal to the Imaginative cognition of
  • Title: Lecture: Michelangelo
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    • could imagine where he got it from. Finally his father sent him to
    • weaving of imagination, we shall feel when we see a block of marble
    • a plastic imagination which tells them that not much would be needed
  • Title: Lecture: Past Incarnations of the Peoples of Today
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    • perhaps to the Middle Ages, and imagines that he is following the
  • Title: Lecture: Morality and Karma
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    • imagine a person who was good to us at a time when we were not yet
  • Title: Lecture: The Inexpressible Name, Spirits of Space and Time.
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    • space what you imagine to be your physical body. You would have a far
  • Title: Lecture: The Etheric Being in the Physical Human Being
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    • pervaded by the growing life of plants. Imaginative knowledge
    • only rely on what lives in you. But imagine that you are suddenly
  • Title: Lecture: Spiritual Knowledge: A Way of Life
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    • physical world, or light, or electricity. That we imagine the moral
  • Title: Lecture: How Can the Destitution of Soul in Modern Times Be Overcome?
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    • dripping with abstractions and demonstrating every imaginable idea
    • thoughts before you in a more pictorial, imaginative way» We
    • science that what may seem to us abstract truths have in them magic
  • Title: Lecture: Modern and Ancient Spiritual Exercises
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    • our imagination. It was different in the remote past for then, as we know,
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 1
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    • into account is this. The greatest imaginable part is played in this
    • Imagine the oxygen
    • accustomed to call it, silicon plays the greatest imaginable part,
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 2
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    • only regard it rightly if we imagine it, compared to man, as standing
    • simple molecules, they imagine, there is a simple structure; then it
    • astonishment they stand before what they imagine as the complicated
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 3
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    • pictures — the sublime cosmic Imaginations, out of which all
    • ghost you could imagine. For the nitrogen-man imitates to perfection
    • whether by day or by night, to the nitrogen. We imagine that we are
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 4
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    • conceive it thus (although in Nature it does not go so far): Imagine
    • it can also have streams of forces pouring inward. Now imagine such
    • Imagine
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 5
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    • I even showed how we can imagine the transition from a thrown-up hillock
    • to increase the number of flies (imagining that they will eat the dirt
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 6
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    • show it diagrammatically (Diagram 11). Imagine
    • and Venus too. As I said, people commonly imagine that the Moon merely
    • imagine that you do the following: You catch a fairly young mouse and
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 7
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    • a regular mush of roots, merging one into another. As you can well imagine,
  • Title: Agriculture Course: Lecture 8
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    • the organism, is altogether wrong. That is what they imagine nowadays,
    • a crude way they imagine, somewhere inside there are the foodstuffs.
    • — I imagine it is so for you all: what we have here been doing
  • Title: Lecture: The Universe
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    • spread out in the universe. Let us therefore imagine this
    • Imagine
  • Title: Lecture: The Templars
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    • a wealth of picture and in wonderful imaginations, Wolfram von Eschenbach
    • picture it. They imagine that time goes ever forward on and on into the
    • imagine that a great poet, a really great poet who creates out of the
    • often imagine they are at liberty to take them! No, a poet like Goethe, for
  • Title: Paths to Knowledge of Higher Worlds
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    • books as imaginative knowledge.
    • Imaginative knowledge does not as yet supply anything pertaining to
    • which is ordinarily reached by self-contemplation. This imaginative
    • morphological or imaginative thinking. When our eye, or some other
    • same way morphological thinking, or imaginative thinking, only exists
    • while we experience it, and what thus arises within imaginative
    • imaginative experience can be impressed on the soul like any other
    • thought. But this is not the case. An imaginative thought vanishes
    • way in which the imaginative experience was reached. The conditions
    • imaginative experience must be recalled, if we wish to have this
    • The imaginative knowledge described to you just now, leads, as
    • soul and body with the aid of imaginative thought. We gain insight
    • we have reached the point of developing this imaginative way of
    • Imaginative knowledge leads us to a survey of our own organisation,
    • Imagine this process of metamorphosis like a glove which is turned
    • super-sensible worlds which follows the stage of imaginative
    • Through the imaginative consciousness which enables us to gain a
    • tableau arising through imagination is placed before the soul and we
  • Title: Errors in Spiritual Investigation
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    • Imagine in ordinary sense observation that a person directed his eyes
    • reality and not his own imaginings (Einbildung). The spiritual
    • themselves but the kind he imagines (ertraeumt), which he believes
  • Title: The Supersensible Being of Man and the Evolution of Mankind
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    • circles today. For we should imagine, in fact, we should be
    • circles today imagine has nothing useful to offer, leads to the kind
    • Imagination. We discover a higher, super-sensible member of
    • centre. A kind of demonic being is imagined as residing in the
    • imaginative knowledge, to which I have just referred, to those of
  • Title: Lecture: The Peoples of the Earth in the Light of Anthroposophy
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    • over. Another great error in modern thought is to imagine that one
  • Title: Lecture: The Christmas Mystery, Novalis, the Seer
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    • which made him aware, as if by a stroke of magic, of the
    • Initiates, represented by the Magi, bringing their offerings
  • Title: Lecture: Some Characteristics of To-day
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    • they imagine they have laid the blame at somebody's door, repeat
    • “imaginative” forces — just as art itself can only
    • be grasped by “imaginative” forces. Man's physical
    • takes seriously, i.e., “Imagination,”
    • Phantasie” (Moral Imagination). In terms of Spiritual Science
    • one could say “imaginative moral impulses.” I
  • Title: Lecture: Anthroposophy's Contribution to the Most Urgent Needs of Our Time
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    • super-sensible cognition by means of Imagination, Inspiration and
    • through anthroposophical spiritual science, by means of Imagination,
    • takes by means of Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition. I
    • to the way in which each exercise on the path to imaginative
    • through Imagination for the knowledge of a truly objective spiritual
    • some extent, as it were throwing out these imaginations from the
    • having, yes, the unreal imaginations. We must deliberately
    • of the former subjective imaginations, objective imaginations light
    • Imaginations which in fact do not come from ourselves, but from
    • its outer appearance through these Imaginations. Exactly in the same
    • so now the Imaginations we have attained give us plenary conviction
    • we not only push the forgetting so far that we throw out the Imaginations,
    • but we go yet a stage further. When a man reaches the Imaginative
    • further, not only to expunge those Imaginations whose details remain within
    • the horizon of the Imaginative world but also to wipe out the imagination
    • imaginative content, we reach the stage of perceiving the
    • Intuition and Imagination we see, soul-spiritually, what is active in
    • Imagination, Intuition and Inspiration we have first as a free inner
    • Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition. But as spiritual
  • Title: Lecture: Buddha and Christ: The Sphere of the Bodhisattvas
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    • induced. Magical effects were produced by means of these symbols and
    • a magical link established with the spiritual world.
    • Buddha will contain a magic power that will become moral
  • Title: Lecture: The Position of Anthroposophy among the Sciences
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    • to-day imagine that Anthroposophy starts somehow from the nebulous
    • am here describing is the ascent to so-called “imaginative
    • perception” (imaginative Anschauung). Every human being
    • well, can be acquired by exercises. “Imaginative
    • “fancy” or “imagination” in the usual sense
    • such “imaginative perception”. In this we come to
    • “Imagination” is as much involved with the inner essence
    • in clairvoyant research. For “imaginative” cognition, the
    • which one can, at most, only calculate and construct imaginary
    • ourselves to “Imagination” and, in the way I have still
  • Title: Lecture: Anthroposophy and the Visual Arts
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    • Imagine that
    • when we do so? Well: imagine yourself standing in a field on a clear,
    • “imaginative cognition”. I have still to speak
    • “imaginations” took shape out of the old, instinctive
    • clairvoyance. One receives an “imagination” of the whole
    • pictures — “imaginations” — which were made
    • the damping-down of this instinctive, living, imaginative perception,
    • “Imagination”.
    • have been calling “Imagination”. In this the cosmos, not
    • able to study the human form with inward, imaginative perception, we
    • “imaginative” view of the starry heavens, have flowed
    • however, perceive (erschauen), by “imagination”,
    • “imaginations” what weaves in mere thoughts; that is, by
    • laws formulated in thoughts, but by “imaginations”. What
    • “imaginations” again. And if we become productive, it
    • Just imagine a rose, or any other plant with a long stalk,
    • that, when we come to study the etheric body — the “imaginative
    • pictures formed by the configured “imaginations” of
    • older “imagination”, and was able to receive into one's
  • Title: Lecture: The Seeds of Future Worlds
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    • still held that it could. They did not imagine that the Gospels were
    • Imagination; but for his vision they become permeated with inward
    • Imagination is active, then we can see in the moon something that is
    • moon in the consciousness of Imagination, you have a perpetual
    • to the sun, there we find it is all quite different. Through Imagination
  • Title: Lecture: Exoteric and Esoteric Christianity
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    • it was impossible even to imagine that there might be no truth in
  • Title: Lecture: Realism and Nominalism
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    • the thought which we shall form now. Imagine that someone tells you
    • Father-principle really played the greatest imaginable part in older
    • Society. Materialism speaks of atoms. These atoms were imagined in
    • atoms. One of these materialists built up a Theory of Atoms and imagined
  • Title: Lecture: Spiritual Science, a Necessity for the Present Time
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    • than can be imagined in the ordinary life of to-day, so that they may
    • to an imaginative knowledge, but they indicate living realities which
  • Title: Lecture: Fundamentals of the Science of Initiation
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    • even a sum of social impulses can be imagined, unless man rises to
  • Title: Lecture: Cosmogony, Freedom, Altruism
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    • works for the rest. But just imagine in our present
    • forces of decline and fall, and one must not imagine that one
    • in the conversion of an imaginary world into a real world,
    • fictitious reality, something imaginary. It is
  • Title: Lecture: Brunetto Latini
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    • imagination. Dante, they say, was filled with
    • artistic imagination. They are content to leave it at that.
    • Needless to say, I shall not deny that artistic imagination
    • in the forms of Imagination. All Nature's laws — the
    • before him in an Imagination, in the figure of a woman who
    • imagine ourselves living in the time of the thirteenth,
    • imagine that there was any reality of being behind the
    • in the form of Imagination, as a woman, out of whose spirit
    • which stood before him in living Imagination.
    • them from within. You must imagine it thus. Just as you came
    • appeared to him in his Imaginative cognition. Then she
    • begin to divine what you now imagine that you know quite
    • he meets it again. He meets again what others imagine that
    • her mother Demeter. Thus do the Imaginations change in the
  • Title: Lecture: The Shaping of the Human Form out of Cosmic and Earthly Forces
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    • Let us imagine
    • Now imagine
    • development: imagine, that is, that through some course of
    • If you imagine this, here, to be the Earth
    • a conditioning effect upon him. Imagine man's earthly nature
  • Title: Lecture: Yuletide and the Christmas Festival
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    • know how absurd it is to imagine that it could be found in
    • warm, magical breath of the Christmas mood presented in these
    • costumes imaginable but their way of bringing the appropriate
  • Title: Lecture: Buddha
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    • to which both the past and the future point. To imagine that the
  • Title: Lecture: Hygiene - a Social Problem
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    • altogether different from what is often imagined.
    • Now Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition
  • Title: Lecture: Speech and Song
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    • we first attain Imagination or Imaginative Cognition, as I have often
    • to begin with at any rate — are lost. In the Imaginative
    • have lost the consonants. In the Imaginative world, the consonants no
    • from Imaginative to Inspired Cognition — when therefore we
    • of sound. It is really childish. Imagine, for a moment, you have a
    • the less are reality. Imagine here the Earth. Around it are the
    • Try to imagine it in its
    • but we are not, it is absolutely real.) Imagine yourself out there in
    • consonants, if we have the necessary clairvoyant power of imagination
  • Title: Lecture: Concerning Electricity
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    • that time to imagine, at least abstractly, the spiritual in Nature.
    • different aspect to the imaginative vision than that of the other
    • the least suspicion. They imagine the atom as something electric, and
    • When we think of them as atoms, in general, when we imagine matter in
    • realize that he is imagining Nature as a complex of little demons of
  • Title: Lecture: The Problem of Jesus and Christ in Earlier Times
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    • that it is possible to imagine that everything we publish today and
    • imagine to ourselves that, based on the broad foundation, so to
    • must imagine further that it was because of the gradual paralysis of
    • imagine how the Christ could dwell within Jesus of Nazareth. He no
    • longer possessed the early Gnosis, which would enable him to imagine
    • to fulfill his mission as the Son has the greatest imaginable
    • previously been distributed among many. Imagine, in the course of
    • manifest? Imagine that Lucifer had never approached humankind, and
    • Now imagine the earth.
    • fact, this difference does exist. Imagine that the luciferic
    • Imagine that Adam's grave — Adam surrendered as a physical body
  • Title: Lecture: On the Dimensions of Space
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    • imaginable difficulties. They know that the physical and bodily is
    • people, who imagine they are not materialistically minded — though
    • Imagine that I here erect a canvas, which I paint from right to left
    • three-dimensional extension. Materialism imagines that it
    • demands on your imagination.)
    • imagine to yourselves a line, drawn through the middle from top to
    • being. Imagine that this one-dimensional being has the peculiar
    • Imagine the plane that becomes a line and then a plane again and then
    • can you imagine graphically what your soul is in its inner being, its
    • a whole, in your imagination the star-fish
  • Title: Lecture: What Has Geology to Say About the Origin of the World?
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    • imagine another covering it which, on examination, proves to be
    • animals and plants within it. But we must not imagine that the
    • the Cambrian bed, namely, the lowest layer, and imagine that all the
    • imagine that these beings have had descendants, that the latter may
    • it must be imagined that on the surface of the outer crust —
    • with the greatest care imaginable — of the investigations which
  • Title: Lecture: Thinking and Willing as Two Poles of the Human Soul-Life
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    • that which becomes visible to us in the present. Imagine a meadow
    • past. And Imagination is related to the present. With regard to the
    • present man is always gifted with Imagination.
    • imagination in some definite situation in life; visualise an
    • continually living in a world of pictures, of imaginations; this will
    • case. We will imagine a conversation taking place between reasonable
    • The present we comprehend by means of imaginations.
    • consider this imaginative life which continually surrounds us in the
    • This imaginative life yields itself up to us. We ourselves do nothing
    • Imagination
    • that Imagination comes to us of itself in so far as the present is
    • concerned. When we develop Imagination by special means we are
    • Imagination. When man passes over from the sleeping condition
    • Inspiration; when falling asleep he is filled with Imagination.
    • AsleepImagination
  • Title: Vortrage: Denken, Fühlen, Wollen - Das Muspilhgedicht
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    • Und die Imagination, die bezieht sich auf die Gegenwart. In bezug auf
    • die Gegenwart hat der Mensch immer Imaginationen.
    • Denken:Imagination:Inspiration:
    • Imaginationen drinnen, und man brauchte nur unbefangen das Leben mit
    • Gegenwart umfassen wir mit Imaginationen.
    • dieses imaginative Leben, das uns in der sinnlichen Gegenwart
    • gibt sich uns dieses imaginative Leben. Wir tun nichts dazu.
    • Ihnen gesagt: Die Imagination kommt uns in bezug auf die Gegenwart
    • von selbst. Wenn wir die Imagination künstlich ausbilden, so
    • Inspiration und Imagination. Indem der Mensch aus dem Schlafe
    • sich, einschlafend imaginiert er. — Sie sehen daraus, daß
  • Title: Evolution/Aspect: Lecture 2: The Inner Aspects of the Saturn-embodiment of the Earth
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    • naturally very difficult for man to imagine this to-day, because his
    • time ceases. This feeling is certainly not pleasant. Imagine that
    • make this comprehensible, we must imagine the following.
    • Imagine this breath of enchantment enormously enhanced — and
    • Now imagine yourself
    • ‘imagination’ is the following: In Knowledge of Higher
    • of Rosicrucian initiation is the forming of imagination. The
    • theosophist must build up these imaginations from the right
    • to-day as transformed into an ‘imagination’: we can
    • imagine the Thrones, the Spirits of Will, kneeling in absolute
    • they have something to offer. Imagine the Thrones, with this desire
    • impressive in certain imaginations, for it can lead us further and
    • into imaginations, into pictures. Even if the pictures are clumsily
    • yield ourselves to these pictures we penetrate into imaginative
  • Title: Evolution/Aspect: Lecture 3: The Inner Aspect of the Sun-embodiment of the Earth
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    • Sun, we must again first form an idea by which we can imagine the
    • the following way as a soul-experience. Let us imagine that a man
    • self, to self-effacement. Imagine this spirit of disinterested
    • insight. But we must imagine what is here called self-surrender as
    • us clearly imagine a being such as this, who through having had this
    • imagine. How could there have been any giving if there had been no
    • as follows: Let us imagine the Spirits of Wisdom as sitting at the
    • picture if we imagine: the sacrificing Thrones kneeling before the
    • imagination, bearing in mind that something of all that was brought
    • sense again come to life on earth. Just imagine all that has been
    • of the universe of radiant light. Imagine all this concentrated in
  • Title: Evolution/Aspect: Lecture 4: The Inner Aspect of the Moon-embodiment of the Earth (Part 1)
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    • magical effects, always require preparation connected with the
    • globe beyond which we conceive of nothing, so that we only imagine
    • hitherto thought whether in pictures or in imagination concerning
    • in imaginations. In this lecture we have alluded to primordial phases
    • with magic force when one stands before this picture, which
  • Title: Evolution/Aspect: Lecture 5: The Inner Aspect of the Moon-embodiment of the Earth (Part 2)
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    • one particular form of change. In this connection let us imagine a
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 1: The Driving Force Behind Europe's War
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  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 3: The Search for a Perfect World
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    • absolute sense they really are the best, one cannot imagine
    • meaningless. But people are able to imagine they could be
    • cannot be realized, but at least they imagine that if
    • the greatest difficulties one can imagine. For when it comes
    • Imagine —
    • by people who let their imaginations run riot, and so there
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 4: The Elemental Spirits of Birth and Death
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    • powers of dynamite, etc., and you can easily imagine, seeing
    • people do not know about it. Modern materialists imagine that
    • symbols to illustrate non-physical ideas. Imagine we have a
    • not to consider such ideas today. Just imagine trying to
    • kind of apology, that one should not, of course, imagine the
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 5: Changes in Humanity's Spiritual Make-up
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    • Imaginations of a genius to arise unconsciously. The power of
    • good look at, is the following. Imagine we have a number of
    • blackest of black magic was practised in Atlantean times, and
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 6: The New Spirituality
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    • imagine. No, this thought-substance is actually what we call
    • unaccustomed idea. Imagine you are lying in bed and it is
    • facetiousness, because they cannot even imagine that there is
    • of many examples. People imagine that the inner life has
    • just imagine what the whole enlightened modern world would say
    • ever awarded to a professor of philosophy. But imagine
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 7: Working from Spiritual Reality
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    • whole of his Michelangelo, are merely figures from a magic
    • Let me give you an example taken from everyday life. Imagine
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 8: Abstraction and Reality
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    • absolute truth; they cannot even imagine that the opposite
    • about as horrible as you can imagine. If you pay for it with
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 9: The Battle between Michael and 'The Dragon'
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    • harmful and damaging things. We may say that a particular
    • entities which will be rummaging through every part of the
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 10: The Influence of the Backward Angels
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    • however, are not viable. Why is this so? Well, imagine
    • Imagine
    • before our eyes, our ears and our other senses. Imagine this
    • foolish those superstitions were! Imagine the way in which
    • purely imaginary. When people think like this, and infinitely
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 11: Recognizing the Inner Human Being
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    • imagined by modern mineralogists, geologists and physicists.
    • them. Imagine a four-legged animal: as it walks, its backbone
    • spirit of human and natural evolution and find imaginative
    • with pleasure because they imagine they are saying something
    • not act from outside, magically, but only in so far as it
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 13: The Fallen Spirits' Influence in the World
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    • 70s, much more so than people imagine today — future
  • Title: Fall/Darkness: Lecture 14: Into the Future
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    • spirits which are at work in them. People tend to imagine
    • and cannot yet be in accord with reality. Imagine what it
    • the whole population. Financiers were usually imagined to be
  • Title: Lecture: Fall and Redemption
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    • imagination. But what is actually intended by
    • take this all the way down into the molecule; and then we imagine a
  • Title: Lecture: Man's Fall and Redemption
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    • than one is inclined to imagine to-day.
    • instance, a Greek imagined when he spoke of the beautiful, in his
    • imagined man in his beauty, as if he had just descended from heaven,
  • Title: Lecture: Calendar of the Soul
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    • should be interpreted, we can translate it into terms of imaginative
  • Title: Lecture: The Spirit in the Realm of Plants
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    • comparison. Imagine that someone found a piece of matter, some kind
  • Title: On the Mysteries of Ancient and Modern Times: Lecture 1
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    • imagine what was living in Dupuis, as an impulse that passed
    • utterly false belief if we imagine that the ideas about God
    • and ‘exoteric’ to these things, but to imagine
    • manipulations became real magic by virtue of these forces
    • have become magical manipulations, simply by virtue of the
    • then prevailing properties of man. Magic would have been
    • magic.’ Therefore at that time it was necessary to veil
  • Title: On the Mysteries of Ancient and Modern Times: Lecture 2
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    • say, in an Imaginative form did endeavour to point out these
    • wrong to imagine that that which is catastrophe in the
  • Title: Lecture: The World Development in the Light of Anthroposophy
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    • imaginative vision here in the physical world, through everything
    • If the world were as people imagine it to be, one could refuse to
    • Gospel in a peculiar manner, with a magic producing reverence,
  • Title: Lecture: The Supersensible in the Human Being and in the Universe
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    • imaginative thinking, to a way of thinking that is inwardly
    • imaginative way of thinking, and a spiritual world rises up
    • details. Imagine, for instance, the following: Today I went up a
    • staircase; I imagine myself on the highest step, not on the
    • experience and imagine it in its reversed order. This strengthens
    • raised to the imaginative stage, and if we also learn to apply
    • magic, not an external charlantanish one.
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Anthroposophy
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    • come to the point of placing before our soul, in the imaginative
    • can have before us, in imaginative thought, images which are just
    • own soul. In the same way we know through imaginative thinking
    • know that only by IMAGINATION we reach the stage of being able to
    • Imaginative
    • sensory perception. Imaginative knowledge shows us what it means
    • attains to the imaginative thinking mentioned in these days,
  • Title: Lecture: East and West in the Light of the Christmas Idea
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    • Christ Jesus. On the one hand there are the three sages, the Magi
  • Title: Lecture: Man and Cosmos
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    • within. We may therefore say: If we imagine a human being
    • perceptions, but imaginations. And these imaginations continually
    • up through us and takes on the form of imaginations or pictures.
    • consciousness is not able to perceive imaginations. They are
    • imagine all the gold existing in some way in the caverns of the
    • imagination, and for this reason ordinary human consciousness
    • on earth had the gift of imagination, he would know that his
    • the perceptive and thinking forces. If we imagine this
    • attain the power of imagination by setting out from your ordinary
    • consciousness, so that the imaginative consciousness would really
    • such a way that every human organ is seized by the imaginative
    • independent, as is the case in imagination, so that they do not
    • imaginative consciousness, the whole astral body and also the
    • would immediately entail the loss of the imaginative
    • through imagination and inspiration.
    • person who is endowed with the imaginative power of knowledge,
    • must not use the imaginative forces of the astral body, located
    • your imagination, and the sun your inspiration, you will obtain
  • Title: Lecture: Human Freedom and Its Connection with the Mystery of Golgotha
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    • began to construct hypotheses. He imagined that the beginning of
    • developed; i.e., not really, but people imagined that this was so
    • the earth, as an imaginative conception contained in religious
    • imagine a spiritual essence in the physical at the beginning and
    • fantasy. In past epochs, people did not imagine the Sun as a
  • Title: Lecture: Knowledge Pervaded with the Experience of Love
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    • stood upon it, I lived in a soul-spiritual world, imaginatively
    • Father could never be imagined in human shape; he had to be
    • imagined in a purely spiritual form. Christ, the Son of God, was
    • imagined to be divine-human. In reality, the longing felt by the
    • imagination and inspiration, and sound common sense really grasps
    • this imagination or inspiration, these confront him in the same
  • Title: Lecture: The Christmas Thought and the Secret of the Ego
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    • to comprehend because one cannot imagine that something remains
  • Title: Lecture: Zarathustra
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    • may imagine a line continuing indefinitely on both sides — in
    • activities of light upon the Earth: behind the Izods we must imagine
  • Title: Lecture: Hermes
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    • as materialistic consciousness imagines to-day. On the contrary,
  • Title: Lecture: On the Nature of Butterflies
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    • Just imagine
    • butterflies and insects in general. You see, men imagine everything to
    • not able to spin threads from its own body, Let us imagine a special
    • let us make a clear picture. Imagine there is an animal that breathes
    • in water. But imagine the animal often rises to the air, gets out on the
    • the ovum inside the mother Maria. So we must imagine it thus: here is
  • Title: Memory and Love
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    • imagine, for example, that thinking is a purely spiritual act, and that
    • experienced at the death of someone very close to you, and imagine vividly
    • in the Samothracean Mysteries. And just imagine this: I arrived at three
  • Title: Conferencia: La Comunión Espiritual de la Humanidad
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    • realidad; a través de la naturaleza misma de las Imaginaciones de
    • imaginarse que aquellos hombres de una época anterior no
    • Sol que reveló un bastante al conocimiento Imaginativo de aquellos
  • Title: Lecture: The Experiences of Sleep and their Spiritual Background
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    • attained; they have often been explained and described here Imaginative,
    • Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive Knowledge. For ordinary
    • any experience at all in sleep. But now, with the advent of Imaginative
    • Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive Knowledge we can experience
    • going to place a picture of it before you arising from Imaginative,
    • answering to each one of these descriptions. And Imaginative Knowledge
    • Imaginative Knowledge, but require Inspired Knowledge for their
  • Title: Lecture: Reincarnation and Karma
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    • lower. I cannot understand Newton's soul unless I imagine it as
  • Title: Lecture: Life and Death
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    • are, again, others who entirely lose the ability of imagining
    • imagine that the experience of the Ego presents something
    • long as that lasts, one notices that the child imagines into
  • Title: Lecture: The Elementary Kingdoms
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    • are apt to imagine after a superficial examination. For these
    • of this, you must say to yourselves: I will try to imagine a
    • we usually imagine this. A mineral's sensation of pain is not
    • just as, imaginatively speaking your fingernails do not each
    • possessed a separate soul. If someone were to imagine that
    • is very easy to imagine that the physical body is the most
    • each takes place during the act of cognition. Now imagine to
    • another. One who imagines everything distinct and separate,
  • Title: Lecture: 'Goethe's Faust' from the Point of View of Spiritual Science
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    • and fool speaking from some fantastic imagination. He is made
    • with true and natural laws; everything imaginary, arbitrary
  • Title: Lecture: Birth of the Light
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    • heads of mankind, three representatives of high magic come to
    • ‘Kings’ in the spiritual sense of the word: magic kings come to
    • order to reach the height of the spiritual King whom the magic
    • do we see Him in the spirit, in His majestic and magic glory.
    • surrounded by the three magic spirit-kings themselves, by
    • magicians, there appears before us the mighty cosmic Being who
    • use of the old heathen magical methods. All this is played out
    • showing how Cyprian feels towards the magic forces of
    • Of fantasy, to speed through life on magic wings.
    • Into his arms by means of magic craft.
    • aside the old magic to understand the Christ-Impulse in its
    • shown to the magic kings, but to the poor shepherds from the
    • spiritual kings, magic kings. The Child of St. Luke's Gospel
    • out into a lonely corner. The magic building of man — we
    • comes into being through so much wisdom as this magic building,
    • of it all. And now imagine all this storming and raging of the
    • order that at that tiny spot the magic building of the child's
  • Title: Lecture: Galileo, Giordano Bruno, and Goethe
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    • imagination, we are called upon to span is wide indeed. It is
    • understand it by placing ourselves, in imagination, in an
    • are the images we construct in our imagination when the
    • of knowledge he terms “the power of imagination.”
    • Imaginative Knowledge, Inspirational Knowledge and Intuitive
  • Title: Lecture: On the Occasion of Goethe's Birthday
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    • that their imaginary universal nebula is finally merged in
    • know what really lives in the thought of men; let us imagine
  • Title: Lecture: The Errors of Spiritual Investigation
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    • worlds. In this way the soul first comes to Imaginative
    • soul, feeling herself capable of letting Imaginations arise
    • these Imaginations merely as mirror-images, shadow-pictures
    • and lead back this imaginative world arising, into his own
    • itself as the counterpart of Imaginative cognition. Once
    • Imaginative cognition, consciousness is strengthened and
    • former feels spiritual beings as he is accustomed to imagine
    • recognise the latter. Imaginative cognition is the complete
    • feel very soon experiences appear in imaginative cognition,
  • Title: Lecture: Factors of Karma, Deficiencies in Psychoanalysis
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    • not even that. Nor must you imagine that the position then
  • Title: Lecture: Matter Incidental to the Question of Destiny
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    • than we imagine.
    • so-called ‘black magic,’ to acquire the black-magical qualities
    • where it produces — not indeed black magic, but the
    • — many, many decimals. Now one might easily imagine this
    • himself. Imagine the judge's situation. But he falls
    • will discover by Imagination those points in life which you
  • Title: Lecture: Hereditary Impulses and Impulses from Previous Earth Lives
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    • commonly imagined. I mean the stream proceeding from certain
  • Title: Lecture: The Relation of Man to the Hierarchies
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    • Nowadays, as I said, there are those who imagine — though
    • whether a man imagines that he of himself can find the way to
    • do so. The question is, not whether he imagines that he is
    • conceiving, who imagine that they are thinking of their
    • more than that. For the point is not whether one imagines that
    • God,’ but that is only a fanciful imagination on their
    • up only to his Angel, but does not admit the fact. He imagines
    • you imagine that the Natural Science of to-day is able to
    • machine he imagines that the only thing that happens is that
    • brought us a demonology but a demonomagic. Modern technical
    • industry is in many respects demonomagic.
    • here imitated. Do you imagine — considering how great is
    • imagine, when we imitate it here on a small scale and let it
    • one can sensibly imagine that this is meant to imply that the
    • another thing beside, there is far more of demonomagic; for
    • and in truth, this demonomagic is progress, and the Earth will
  • Title: Lecture: The Birth of Christ in the Human Soul
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    • formed for themselves the great and powerful imagination of the
  • Title: Lecture: The Mysteries (Die Geheimnisse)
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    • Adoration and the Presentation by the three Magi, the three
    • something spiritual. He imagined that when the sun looked
    • the esoteric Christian imagined that the sun cherished and
    • initiation into the higher worlds, were known as “Magi.” They
    • with the ancient Magi, who laid the best gifts that they had in
    • world, cannot easily imagine that there is still another task
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 1. Angels, Folk Spirits, Time Spirits: their part in the Evolution of Mankind.
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    • the bed, and float outside them. Now imagine that in this condition
    • Life Spirit. If you imagine such Beings who are at the Archangel
    • side by side, we can then imagine, at least theoretically — and
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 2. Normal and abnormal Archangels and Time Spirits.
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    • as you can readily imagine, this does not complete the picture of a
    • spiritual world. Those who imagine that a few ideas suffice for the
    • achieve practical results. This is an historic fact. Imagine the
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 3. The inner Life of the Folk Spirits. Formation of the Races.
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    • whether you construct a triangle or merely imagine it, you will know
    • there is no need to go outside yourself. You can imagine for a moment
    • longer exist. Imagine the external world as non-existent and space a
    • you can imagine that which can only be arrived at externally through
    • plants and animals. Instead of this, imagine their spiritual gaze to
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 5. Manifestation of the Hierarchies in the Elements of Nature.
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    • at A we have the Bohemian Plateau. Now imagine a huge wave thrown up
    • the forces. Just imagine for a moment how powerful are the forces of
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 6. The Five Root Races of Mankind.
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    • complicated matter, as you may well imagine, when the Spirits of the
    • complicated that when we imagine we have grasped one point of view we
    • imagine that a certain Sun-force, which streams towards us in the
    • ago. You must therefore imagine the Spirits of Form radiating from a
    • can well imagine that as man has many senses, many modifications are
    • stages of higher cognition, in Imagination, Inspiration and
    • this moribund Red Indian race confronts a European colonist. Imagine
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 8. The Five Post-Atlantean Civilizations.
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    • insight into the hidden workings of that world. Now imagine
    • Mimir the magic draught of the Gods, that magic draught which once
    • in Teutonic mythology in the form of imaginative pictures, events
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 9. Loki - Hodur and Baldur - Twilight of the Gods.
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    • Clairvoyantly they saw the dawning of their ego in an imaginative
    • which arise from muddled thinking, at almost every turn. Imagine the
    • wolf in pursuit of the Sun. The old imaginative Nordic man sees these
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 10. The Mission of Individual Peoples and Cultures in the Past, Present and Future.
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    • stemmed, not from an imaginary, but from a spiritually real Indian
  • Title: Mission/Folk-Souls (1970): 11. Nerthus, Freyja and Gerda.
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    • that Teutonic mythology contains something which, in imaginative
    • imaginative conceptions of Teutonic mythology and has persisted so
    • of the ‘I’. A remarkable magic ship is placed at his
    • box. What is this magic ship? If Freyr is the power which transmits
    • clairvoyant forces to the physical plane, then this magic ship is
    • magic ship spreads its sails and is then folded up again into the
    • imagination, as the height of folly. Today materialism has invaded
    • imagines. If a conflict were to arise between the peoples of the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 2
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    • clairvoyant or imaginal knowledge; today he has
    • credulous scholars of today imagine. No, they were living figures of
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 3
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    • Try to imagine
    • sloe, which contracts the palate; imagine this wry sensation enhanced
    • of astringency, of downright pain; try to imagine yourself from top
    • should like to be one with the scent of the trees!’ Imagine
    • surroundings ... imagine the experience transferred into the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 5
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    • to terms with the proper concepts. It is difficult to imagine that
    • imagine that the macrocosmic counterpart of the forces at work in our
    • which are also called laws. Try then to imagine to yourself a real
    • Atlanteans, and imagine an observer endowed with full consciousness
    • something further. Try to imagine for a moment that, by a miracle, it
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 6
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    • consciousness? Let us imagine that, by some miracle or other, instead
    • imagine him as not yet in a body which has already been subjected to
    • just on the point of doing so; they could only imagine that Dionysos
    • component parts. Imagine for a moment that by some kind of magic the
    • which imagines that it can dig up from the strata of the physical
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 7
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    • confronted by its own absolute need. But imagine this realisation
    • external world. That is the normal thing. And now imagine some
    • The ancient Greek imagined that the present comeliness of the human
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 8
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    • could likewise imagine that a denser development went on in Saturn,
    • sheathed in a more rarefied evolution. We could imagine that there
    • streams, are at a far higher stage. Imagine for a moment that man was
    • a being. Imagine that we were to give birth to our thoughts as
    • Imagine that we were not just to think thoughts, but that with each
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 9
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    • imagine how complex and manifold is the world that lies about us and
  • Title: Lecture: The Mission of Raphael in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • give any conception of what Raphael's magic once charmed on those walls.
  • Title: Lecture: About Horses That Can Count and Calculate
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    • we generally imagine. For mathematical conclusions are formed, as it
  • Title: Lecture: The National Epics With Especial Attention to the Kalevala
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    • Grimm spoke of an actual creative imagination permeating human evolution
    • mean to man. Thus Hermann Grimm always spoke of the creative imagination
    • human soul-forces; an imagination which to him in some way fulfilled
    • if one speaks of imagination as a real power. And if, to many what is
    • assent. Much of it will probably be regarded as fancy, as imagination;
    • imaginings to which Hermann Grimm was led with regard to the national
    • epics, but one is led to something which far surpasses imagination,
    • forces namely, of imagination. Imagination, intellect and reason worked
    • was not separated into imagination and intellect; we ought no longer
    • imagination. We know quite well to-day that when we speak of imagination
    • in this matter; he takes care not to confuse what imagination gives
    • the spirit of man manifested in those pre-historic times, before imagination
    • find the present-day imagination, but — if we may use the expression
    • — what at that time gave imagination to the human soul had something
    • to do with an actuality, a reality; imagination was not yet imagination;
    • developed, are hidden. More deeply did those forces which were not imagination
  • Title: Four Seasons/Archangels: Lecture I: The Michael Imagination
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    • the year in four Cosmic Imaginations. The activities of four mighty
    • at St. John's Tide. These Imaginations provide material for endless
    • MICHAEL IMAGINATION
    • dragon to appear again as a forcible Imagination, summoning man to
    • truth not such a material thing as present-day science imagines, but
  • Title: Four Seasons/Archangels: Lecture II: The Christmas Imagination
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    • the year in four Cosmic Imaginations. The activities of four mighty
    • at St. John's Tide. These Imaginations provide material for endless
    • CHRISTMAS IMAGINATION
    • bringing Imagination and Inspiration to bear on it, one comes to
    • imagine how this could be portrayed.
    • Imagination which must in fact come to a man who transposes his
    • Imaginations. If one goes out with one's whole being into the
    • world, the approach of autumn becomes the glorious Imagination of
    • Imagination at Christmas-time — a picture we can live
    • Easter Imagination can arise; we will speak of it tomorrow.
    • magnificent Imaginations. So, in order to represent all that is
    • during the deep winter season, we have an artistic, imaginative
    • the course of the year can reveal itself to us in four Imaginations:
    • the Michael Imagination, the Mary Imagination and — as we shall
    • see later on — the Easter Imagination and the St. John Imagination.
  • Title: Four Seasons/Archangels: Lecture III: The Easter Imagination
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    • the year in four Cosmic Imaginations. The activities of four mighty
    • at St. John's Tide. These Imaginations provide material for endless
    • EASTER IMAGINATION
    • living, spiritual forms which appear as Imaginations.
    • imagine it to be. The fact is that every spring the Ahrimanic beings
    • on the cosmos than is commonly imagined.
    • cosmic Imagination comes before us as
    • the Easter Imagination, just as we had the Virgin and Child as the
    • Christmas Imagination in deep winter, and the Michael Imagination for
    • Imaginations which come before man at Michaelmas and Christmas, I was
    • Easter Imagination, where over against the activities of the
    • Imagination can lead directly to a ritual in the earthly realm, a
  • Title: Four Seasons/Archangels: Lecture IV: The St. John Imagination
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    • the year in four Cosmic Imaginations. The activities of four mighty
    • at St. John's Tide. These Imaginations provide material for endless
    • ST. JOHN IMAGINATION
    • look with Imaginative perception into the depths of the Earth at St.
    • reverence and worship, to what the Easter Imagination, the
    • cosmic Easter Imagination, is. And now, for the St. John's time,
    • concentrated Imagination of Cosmic Understanding.
    • Imagination. These things are quite real, but I cannot speak of them
    • Imagination will come to meet us. For the St. John Imagination is
    • there, just as we have the Michael Imagination, the Christmas
    • Imagination, the Easter Imagination.
    • together in Imagination all those secrets of the depths which go to
    • Thus arises this Imagination of the
    • Trinity, which is really the St. John Imagination. The background of
    • Imagination of the Trinity would have to emerge. Special arrangements
    • the like. And if the true Imagination of these things is to be called
    • must imagine how all that I have
    • Imagination passes over into Inspiration.
    • him, confirming him — the St. John Imagination filled
    • Imagination — in these words:
  • Title: Four Seasons/Archangels: Lecture V: The Working Together of the Four Archangels
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    • the year in four Cosmic Imaginations. The activities of four mighty
    • at St. John's Tide. These Imaginations provide material for endless
    • before you the four cosmic Imaginations which can be called up
    • the Beings who appear in conjunction with these imaginative pictures.
    • four great cosmic Imaginations, as I described them to you —
    • the Autumn Imagination of Michael, the Christmas Imagination of
    • Gabriel. the Easter Imagination of Raphael, and the Midsummer,
    • St. John's Day, Imagination of Uriel. You must really picture to
    • the four Imaginations.
    • you how the Easter Imagination is completed through the teaching that
    • Michael-Imagination, with the sword forged from meteoric iron,
    • an old magical saying and were used again by Goethe:
    • being of spirit, soul and body, these forces work magically in him.
    • primitive folk, and people cannot imagine how they have been come by.
  • Title: Fifth Gospel (1950): Lecture I
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    • lectures. We will imagine that there were no Gospels at all to
    • he may imagine that he himself once lived as an ape in some
  • Title: Fifth Gospel (1950): Lecture II
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    • they actually happened. I can imagine someone like Ernest
  • Title: Fifth Gospel (1950): Lecture V
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    • little. It would be a complete mistake to imagine that up to
    • spiritual picture of Him. You can imagine how deeply such
    • them as a spiritual Presence. You can imagine, too, what an
    • His love, His goodness, His gentleness; but now a magic power
  • Title: Lecture: The (Four) Great Virtues
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  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 1: Natural Science
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    • in earlier times projected all sorts of imaginings on to
    • nature: the imagination was not all that unusually active.
    • inclined, we imagine the relationship differently. We
  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 2: Psychology
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    • when we really say to ourselves: this imaginal knowledge cannot
    • life. He steps out of this body and learns to see imaginally,
    • willing and in what lies between, feeling. In an imaginally
  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 3: East and West in History
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    • science, to exclude the imagination from everything that is
    • that will have lively imaginal thinking as I have described it
  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 4: Spiritual Geography
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    • in its life, diversity and imaginative working to the soul's
    • us imagine for a moment that we are in the laboratory: how
    • spiritual imagination and inspiration, so that what today
  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 6: Individual and Society
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    • times, there could exist attitudes that were more imaginal and
    • imaginal attitudes if we are to take our place within the
    • instinctively in earlier epochs, fertilizing the imagination
    • first is that of discovering imaginatively our own position.
  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 7: The Individual Spirit and the Social Structure
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    • divine and spiritual entities, and that by certain magical
  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 8: The Problem (Asia-Europe)
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    • find a way to imaginative identification with others.
  • Title: Tension Between East and West: Lecture 10: From Monolithic to Threefold Unity
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    • imagine an extreme case: In some subject or other, there are
  • Title: Lecture: Pythic, Prophetic and Spiritual-Scientific Clairvoyance
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    • those regions which open to Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive observation.
    • learn to know ourselves when we learn to know the imaginations which
    • thus built up. This inner world can consist of a sum of imaginations.
    • then experiences the imaginative world so that he seems as it were to
    • swim in the blood as a fish in water. But this imaginative world is
    • inner, imaginative world, which was a part of himself. He perceived
    • how he himself is included in the cosmos. He also was aware imaginatively
    • an imagination of taste but does not work formatively, so in many people,
    • know, and so on. The principle of living in a few imaginations
    • which might be called: blood and nerve imaginations, still exists in
    • few blood and nerve imaginations. But this is not what leads us to selfless
    • labour for human evolution, such a tarrying in blood and nerve imaginations
    • that which kindles the blood or nerve imaginations, they then think
    • such imaginative clairvoyance. These feelings are no conquest of egoism,
  • Title: Lecture: Pythic, Prophetic and Spiritual-Scientific Clairvoyance
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    • those regions which open to Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive
    • learn to know ourselves when we learn to know the Imaginations
    • This inner world can consist of a sum of Imaginations, whereas in
    • then experiences the Imaginative world so that he seems as it were
    • to swim in the blood as a fish in water. But this Imaginative world
    • inner, Imaginative world, which was a part of himself. He perceived
    • Imaginatively of what came to him as a breath from outside…
    • Mosel, which of course rises only to an Imagination of taste but does
    • so on. The principle of living in a few Imaginations which might be
    • called blood and nerve Imaginations, still exists in many. Many
    • and nerve Imaginations. But this is not what leads us to selfless
    • imaginations leads only to a heightening of self-enjoyment, to a
    • blood or nerve Imaginations. They then think they can be excused
    • Imaginative clairvoyance. These feelings are not a conquest of
  • Title: St. Augustine
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    • the demonological stage. Human beings imagined that behind the
    • were active and operative; spirits were imagined everywhere in
  • Title: Architectural Forms
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    • should be stupid indeed to imagine that anything
    • his Cosmogony to imagine a “Retrospective
  • Title: Goethe's Secret Revelation: Lecture I
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    • The Snake next forms a Magic Circle; and the Youth and the
    • of imaginative thought enters the Youth. At this instant he is
  • Title: Goethe's Secret Revelation: Lecture II
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    • imaginative fancy. The day before yesterday we set ourselves the task
    • have before us a poetic work, a work of comprehensive imaginative
    • his imagination, the right to do it? Can one object: the plant knows
  • Title: Goethe's Secret Revelation: Lecture III
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    • magic, theosophy, etc., of which they wrote. It was impossible to
    • — a mysticism, a magic, a theosophy, treating of things which
    • called theosophy, magic and the occult, came very near to being
    • black magicians and swindlers, as men who had quitted the right
    • remnants of magic and similar things from the Middle Ages; and
    • magic also known to Goethe, will clearly recognize the book to
    • surroundings. Then the magic word, which if rightly applied can
    • leading men from the first stage up to that of imaginative vision,
  • Title: Goethe's Secret Revelation: Lecture IV
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    • itself to sense-phenomena. Now just imagine for a moment all these
    • ‘imaginative world.’ When Goethe presented this,
    • body. When he brings back the merely imaginative image from the
    • imagines he has done everything when he describes the externals.
    • imagine they can ladle out the whole of its depth with such
    • thereby grows together in its clairvoyant and magical deeds with
  • Title: World History: Lecture I: Evolution of the Soul and of Memory
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    • respect of knowledge, it is imagined that in ancient times
  • Title: World History: Lecture II: Mysteries of 'Asia'
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    • any way possible for him to imagine such a thing as matter
    • Imaginations and pictures. The pictures were not so real as
    • forth out of these Imaginations, learned to say: I must be a
  • Title: World History: Lecture III: Asiatic Mysteries of Ephesus, Gilgamesh and Eabani
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    • who to-day through Imaginative cognition is able to attain to a
    • books would lead one to imagine, but that the Earth is a living
    • you can imagine that, if a man's being were so
    • up into itself from all sides the Imaginations and influences
    • Imaginations, concretely, externally present.
    • These Imaginations had the form of gigantic, plant-like
    • organisms, and out of that which was, so to speak, ‘imagined’
    • formed itself as plant in the Earth through Imagination, he
  • Title: World History: Lecture IV: Atlantean Wisdom in the Mysteries of Hibernia, Gilgamish and Eabani at Ephesus, Logos Mysteries of Artemis at Ephesus
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    • filled with Imaginations. And these Imaginations were pictures
    • Imagine that we have here the expired air, on which are
    • must not imagine this to mean that when one travels to Asia one
  • Title: World History: Lecture V: Mysteries of the East, West, and of Ephesus
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    • from himself this plant-world. Imagine that you were to become
    • — and you will by this imagination call up again in your
    • you must imagine how the knowledge that belonged to the ancient
    • look in Imaginations. Spiritual vision is needed there. Yes, we
    • East. When we look East, we have to look in Imaginations. We
    • Looking across to the East and letting our imagination be fired
    • — for it needs to be grasped with the imagination. And
  • Title: World History: Lecture VI: Mysteries of the Ancient Near East Enter Europe
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    • defined. We shall do wrong to imagine that we can understand
  • Title: World History: Lecture VII: The Fifteenth Century and the Transition from Mind-Soul to Spiritual-Soul
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    • that she contains. Then we have a picture, an imagination of
    • circumference. Imagine for a moment that you are going out and
    • of imaginations, and they make a picture to themselves of this
    • imagine the old hen has the complicated albumen. This is
    • to the earthly or central forces. But we can also imagine these
    • it in a drawing. Imagine that this is the human being. His
    • that stream in from all sides. You may imagine albumen to begin
    • imagine that some organ, let us say one of the lungs has
    • attained to imaginative cognition and are able to perceive the
  • Title: World History: Lecture IX: World History in the Light of Anthroposophy
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    • imagined, one feels: Oh! if only it were possible to protect
  • Title: Purpose of the Goetheanum and Anthroposophy
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    • us imagine for a moment, merely to develop the thought that is
    • When a man is convinced that the imagination of the dream can
    • element of memory; namely, the capacity for imagining.
    • all thinking and imagining, after having first most actively
    • us imagine that we are in a great city where there is a
    • the earth-life etherically before you, as by magic. This inner
    • formed only in the imagination. Geometry is not a spontaneous
    • also made in accordance with the same laws. You cannot imagine
  • Title: Goethe, Comte and Bentham
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    • the soul of man when he develops Imaginative Consciousness, that in
    • personalities; that we can only do when we attain the Imaginative
    • Imaginative Consciousness when we so experience our thinking that,
    • enough to attain Imaginative Cognition.
    • know, Imaginative Cognition is not present. From the moment of
  • Title: Whitsuntide in the Course of the Year
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    • into the sleeping Earth-soul in order to have Imagination,
    • the. dream-like Imagination of the old spiritual vision, then
    • really is, all we need do is to imagine ourselves in the
    • of the earth work into the earth. Imagine yourself on a night
  • Title: Meditation and Concentration
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    • an imaginative character, tinged with feeling.
    • the force of imagination. Our whole spirit would then be
    • imagination will realise that in the depths of our spirit,
  • Title: Tree of Knowledge and the Christmas Tree
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    • than by our imagining this individual active among us, and by
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture I
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    • must not be imagined that, in Strassburg, Goethe simply trifled
    • to Faust's explanation of why he turned to a magic
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture II
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    • to another case. Can you imagine, for instance, the development
    • imagine that Goethe had a direct experience of a similar kind
    • Faust. We might imagine that Goethe had written them
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture III
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    • because many people, although not really dreaming, imagine that
    • I have described. Just imagine, however, that all those who in
    • did not have to give them anymore. Imagine that things would be
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture IV
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    • imagine, in the work that occupies the greater part of their
    • fantastic imaginations.
    • facts, and I imagine they are not congruent with your own
    • imagine what a truly good person who has reached an especially
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture VI
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    • that in some schools of black magic the custom exists of
    • acquiring the means for performing black magic by having the
    • magic, of course, but to our present civilization. Much today
    • entered. You can imagine the situation, but he nevertheless
    • in the right way, your imagination will reveal to you those
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture VII
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    • of course, one of the dumbest examples imaginable. If I now
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture IX
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    • imagines he can find the way to his god, but rather
    • at all the question of whether the human being imagines he has
    • person imagines that he or she is finding the way to the
    • this fact you can imagine that oral communications in those
    • demon magic that frequently imbues modern technology.
    • more of demon magic because this operates with entirely
    • magic signifies progress, and the earth will continue to make
  • Title: Karma of Vocation: Lecture X
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    • imagined they had to look up to a certain ancestor, but the
    • imagine how worried his parents were. Soon thereafter, Sir
  • Title: Mysteries of the Sun: Lecture I
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    • Just imagine
    • diagram. (see diagram 1). Imagine you had a figure that was
    • portraits, and that this has a particular sequel. Imagine
    • cupola, portraying themselves there, imagine that this
    • imagine a second figure. I will sketch the second figure so
  • Title: Mysteries of the Sun: Lecture II
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    • in man the head and the breast-system. But imagine all that
    • inside. Imagine it must also have an outside. So I will call
    • But now imagine you could quickly fly out there, fly beyond
    • imagine your view of the world from the other side; imagine
    • represent this little bit by doing it like this. Imagine now
    • mechanism. Just imagine what it really means when a man has
  • Title: Mysteries of the Sun: Lecture III
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    • imagination and picture that everything materially filling
    • brain and imagine we are looking at the soul-life of an
    • intermingled thoughts, and I beg you to imagine that finely
    • must, however, have the possibility of imagining the world to
    • something eternal — so the scientist imagines — and
    • various magisterial seats and to go on cherishing what is
  • Title: Threefold Order II: Lecture 1: Influence of the human will upon the course of economic life
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    • generally — in the way imagined by many people at the
  • Title: Threefold Order II: Lecture 2: On Propaganda of the Threefold Social Order
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    • for reading the book in full. But if anyone imagines that he
    • leading classes imagine, that in a little while maybe things
    • imagine that it was a form of speech, that it was a phrase,
  • Title: Reincarnation and Immortality: Lecture I: Free Will, Immortality
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    • the spiritual world, imaginative knowledge.
    • do we acquire this imaginative knowledge? Mainly by applying
    • the development of our imaginative life. This means that we no
    • imaginations, themselves appear as objective entities in
    • the soul, and in fact, we can live in such imaginations. It is
    • described, that these imaginations no longer arise out of the
    • is the imaginative world that we first experience — we
    • soul. Imaginations, on the other hand, are processes which take
    • between imaginations and visions can, it is true, become a
    • called imagination, is our ordinary fantasy. Our higher
    • imaginative life is not simply an act of our fantasy any more
    • in the life of imagination where we know that the chair cannot
    • imaginative knowledge is by no means satisfied with this world
    • transparent. Imagine that you have eyes in your eye sockets,
    • imaginations transparent, the second thing necessary in order
    • the soul to get beyond the stage of imagination and enter the
    • important to grasp this. We know that by means of imaginative
    • imagination and inspiration is the same as when, in going to
    • imaginations. It is not that we develop a lower form of
    • penetrate into the spiritual world by imagination,
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  • Title: Reincarnation and Immortality: Lecture II: The Historical Evolution of Humanity
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    • the imagination which felt itself stimulated to think in
    • imaginative conception of life, which, according to Lamprecht's
    • to learn. For however much our age imagines it lives in
    • have previously described this as imaginative knowledge,
    • forth if history is studied with the help of imagination and
    • — imagination, inspiration and intuition — to
    • pictures, in imaginations, must be called forth from the depths
    • of historical evolution. These imaginations must then
    • power that is used when we apply imaginative knowledge. It
    • science of spirit, working with imagination, inspiration and
    • Imagination, inspiration and intuition provide us with a true
    • imagination and inspiration reach down into our
    • means of imagination, inspiration and intuition it will be
  • Title: Reincarnation and Immortality: Lecture III: The Supersensible Being of Man
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    • Imagine that a statue stands before us — it has a
    • definite form. Then imagine that the moment could arrive when
    • We must in no way imagine that this world is a mere repetition
    • affecting us. But it is not as some would imagine that we see a
    • ghost as imagined by trivial and superstitious kinds of
  • Title: Reincarnation and Immortality: Lecture IV: Nature of Anthroposophy
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    • called, in the books I have mentioned, “Imaginative
    • have called the first stage by the name “Imaginative
    • possible; one must go so far as to imagine the ascent of a
    • imagined into processes, in their growth and change. We come to
    • cannot imagine a nutshell being formed by any other laws than
  • Title: Reincarnation and Immortality: Lecture V: Mystery of the Human Being
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    • be imagined as effective in the material world. — And how
    • today, an atom of iron must be imagined as being more
    • as complicated as a Steinway piano. Thus we have to imagine
    • Just imagine, we are confronted by the fact that one of the
    • giving an outline of how one can imagine this other way of
    • sleep. The reason we cannot imagine anything like an ego in us
    • something we cannot imagine. The ego is always asleep and there
    • is no difference between the way the ego should be imagined in
    • and imagination, even when we are awake — these truths,
    • imaginative life there is to be found an aspect of
    • alive in the activity of his imagination and thinking.
    • If you imagine that someone — I only want to
  • Title: The Real Being of Man
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    • death. Only we must not imagine that the reflection of the
  • Title: Necessity for Spiritual Knowledge: Lecture 1 (alternate translation)
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    • must never imagine that what we are doing perhaps under the
    • talking” We should not imagine that it is necessary to
  • Title: Necessity for Spiritual Knowledge: Lecture 2
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    • of the disclosures of modern history man has imagined the
    • when we really see it and do not merely imagine it in an
    • may be held by a man in a railway train who imagines that he
    • imaginable — the rules are almost as worthless for
    • from this, there is something else. Men generally imagine
    • to the thought that imagines the kind of empire which has
    • the opposite of thinking which imagines that once a blessed
    • holds sway at the present time; men really imagine that there
    • theories imaginable.
  • Title: Man and Nature: Intellect in Man and Nature Bereft of the Gods
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    • convention to imagine that man's life of soul is
    • contemplation of the external world alone. Let us not imagine
    • imagine that it pumps the blood in every direction and then
  • Title: The Physical-Superphysical: Its Realisation Through Art
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    • by magic — this is perceived by everyone who confines his
    • magically conjured within nature herself can be discovered
    • intensively — seems to us so magical, so mysterious, is
    • magical quality running through the whole of nature
    • Imagination — but through Intuition. Through the vision
  • Title: The Sources of Artistic Imagination and the Sources of Supersensible Knowledge
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    • The Sources of Artistic Imagination andThe Sources of Supersensible Knowledge
    • The Sources of Artistic Imagination and the
    • imagination, artistic creative power and appreciation, and
    • whence artistic imagination receives its impulses, such
    • imagination. Writers of fairy-tales or other artists who try
    • imagination and the conscious vision that can function in the
    • essentials of the connection between artistic imagination and
    • artistic imagination and seership it is necessary to realise
    • creating out of artistic imagination or phantasy will
    • will be of artistic imagination, based upon his personal
    • imagination. I do not mean by this that the seer, when in
    • of these few words into a self-contained imagination of a
    • poetry, although the imagination has no real link with the
    • it into an inner perception, into an imagination, filling it
    • shapes his phantasy and imagination by the application of
    • colour, he develops imaginations. It is important, however,
    • the opposite side and from there enters into the imaginations
    • imagine that seership arises when a man
    • imagination and super-sensible knowledge on the other. A
    • imagination; it is an inner experience, not abstract but so
  • Title: Lecture: Human Knowledge and Its Significance for Man and the Cosmos
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    • In the ordinary way we imagine that the only purpose of the knowledge
    • are contained in the wheat. Anyone who imagines that it is possible
    • from the realm of Imagination, my dear friends, can be multiplied over
    • impossible to imagine a more erroneous line of reasoning. The truth
  • Title: Anthroposophical Ethics ... St. Francis, Lecture III
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    • than by our imagining this individual active among us, and by
  • Title: Teachings of Christ the Resurrected
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    • dreamlike and imaginative in character, it was
    • course, be wrong to imagine that the meeting with such a being
    • let us imagine that at the time of the Mystery of Golgotha
    • is, through a knowledge based on imaginative and inspirative
    • can hardly imagine this “metabolic knowledge,”
  • Title: Eternal Soul of Man in the Light of Anthroposophy
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    • us imagine once that this popular consciousness actually works
    • but an Imagination where the memory is so far advanced that
    • this an ordinary memory image? Imagine how people have
    • but represents an overall Imagination of a previous earth life.
    • imagine then that we come to the deep, silent solitude of the
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture I: The Significance of Supersensible Knowledge Today
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    • firmly entrenched in the whole fabric of the state. Imagine
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture II: Blood is a Very Special Fluid
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    • written in blood? Can you imagine anyone wishing to possess
    • of life. Do not for a moment imagine that the life body is
    • lifeless. Natural science attempts to do that by imagining
    • If you imagine
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture III: The Origin of Suffering
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    • with ridicule and derision. Let us now imagine two persons,
    • wit, and power of observation and imagination, than we learn
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture VI: Education in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • child, it is not impossible, but certainly highly damaging to
    • imagination, and that induces movement in the inner organs
    • throwing itself body and soul into what the imagination
    • through imagination, so its inner organs are condemned to
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture V: Illness and Death
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    • memory and creative imagination.
    • body is the bearer of creative imagination and memory, and
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture VII: Education and Spiritual Science
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    • those of today's most fertile imagination. Furthermore, an
    • rich imaginative pictures. The spiritual behind the
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture VIII: Insanity in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • imaginative, pictorial ideas and images are more akin to
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture IX: Wisdom and Health
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    • innermost being. It is not through some magical formula that
    • entities. This is the realm of Imagination; of ideas that are
    • not a product of fantasy. Fantasy is related to imagination
    • raised to become imagination.
    • yet have access to the world of imagination, but it is a
    • light-filled, sound-filled imagination; then they attain
    • imaginative wisdom. The plant then discerns its own image in
    • imaginative knowledge reaches the ether or life body, filling
    • of imaginative knowledge is easiest to see in an incident
    • the Power of imagination, impressed itself deeply into the
    • were produced simply by what the persons concerned imagined
    • Imaginative wisdom will bring a person health. When knowledge
    • imagination. Spiritual science is such wisdom, and has the
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture XI: Who are the Rosicrucians?
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    • Acquisition of imaginative knowledge
    • stage is the acquisition of imaginative thinking.
    • is meant by imaginative thinking?
    • knowledge of Rosicrucianism, gave a hint at what imaginative
    • through life, a Rosicrucian had to acquire imaginative
    • meant by imaginative knowledge.
    • sorrow, then you begin to understand imaginative knowledge.
    • striving for imaginative knowledge in Rosicrucianism, and
    • imaginative knowledge; color and sound separate from objects and
    • rises from imaginative knowledge to direct knowledge of the
    • reason, and imaginative knowledge the life of feelings,
    • knowledge, and imagination spiritual vision, knowledge of the
    • occult script brings magic. It brings direct insight into the
  • Title: Supersensible Knowledge: Lecture XIII: The Bible and Wisdom
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    • acquainted with old linguistic usage will not imagine that
  • Title: An Impulse for the Future
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    • in chaos with its jumbled whirlpool of rummaging forces provides the
  • Title: Contrasting World-conceptions of East and West
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    • Europe it is almost impossible at this time to imagine how
    • have often mentioned that now people imagine that everything
    • condition which they only imagine. And when the time began
    • being, the instincts and passions, as they are imagined to-day,
    • imagination; they are divine-spiritual forces which have
    • incorrect, untrue imaginings. Similarly the divine-spiritual
  • Title: Year's Course as a Symbol for the Great Cosmic Year
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    • necessary to use an imaginative language, as I mean to do
  • Title: Spiritual Relations in the Configuration of the Human Organism: Lecture I
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    • red. You can realize this especially well, if you, let us say, imagine
    • dissolves. What wants to be formed there? Imagine, how that is. If I
    • Imagine, someone tells you
    • imagination, if one simply sees how things are remembered, leads us
    • flows out from the kidney; these are the imaginations, which swim on
    • to him in imaginations. This is an extraordinarily interesting formation
    • hit into each other. Imagine these two rhythms were alike, then we would
    • Imagine you run along next
    • way. Now imagine, the astral organism and the ego which vibrate then
  • Title: Spiritual Relations in the Configuration of the Human Organism: Lecture II
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    • whole normal organization of man. Imagine, how all this has to be in
  • Title: Spiritual Relations in the Configuration of the Human Organism: Lecture III
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    • it would be this way: (diagram 1). If one imagined the earth this way,
    • Imaginations. And we must be clear that we simply must reach the point
    • manifold Imaginations of plant forms. And just with the help of these
    • today — to an imaginative way of looking, by “striking the
    • imagine that the new heart moved in (red) before the old heart is completely
    • do it — that is, they imagine that they cannot do it — because
  • Title: Necessity and Freedom: Lecture I: The Past Shows Us a Picture of Necessity
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    • sense world. And do not imagine this to apply only to unlimited
    • can of course cogitate on freedom and necessity and imagine you
    • necessity? Or could we imagine that if only the chauffeur
    • Just imagine, a book has just been published by the great
    • person imagine that there can be any talk about the immortality
  • Title: Necessity and Freedom: Lecture II: The Legend of the Prague Clock
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    • are, so to speak, lost in the woods and imagining we are making
    • cause of countless possible effects. For just imagine how
    • us imagine that a person might have stood in front of the
    • imaginations a person might see, for that sparrow was not mere
    • sparrow as an imagination. I just wanted to mention that.
    • can also imagine something else. Taking this aspect into
    • this imagination. One might begin to think of the artist's
    • Even in dramas where magic plays a part, he is only allowed the
    • magic must lead to grand results. In the case of Faust
    • his seducer does not need magic; everything he does any
    • who believed what he wrote. Now imagine what would have
    • have just heard. For I imagine some antipathetic feelings
  • Title: Necessity and Freedom: Lecture III: Three Teachers with Different Attitudes
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    • us imagine we are in a school, a school of three classes, with
    • as that teacher did. They just could not imagine it.
    • what was before that and before that again, and imagine we will
    • give you another hypothetical example. Imagine someone
    • now let us imagine another person, younger perhaps. I
    • doing the same thing. We might even imagine the following. A
    • possibly imagine that it would be of any use if the
  • Title: Necessity and Freedom: Lecture IV: The Roman World and the Teutonic Tribes
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    • all the points that should be considered. For just imagine, if
    • are connected in the world. Imagine a Roman or a Teuton
    • anyone imagines that his freedom could ever be
    • might also imagine a painter who wanted to be completely free
    • physical plane as we imagined it should, we have failed. If
  • Title: Necessity and Freedom: Lecture V: The "I" is Found on the Physical Plane in Acts of Will
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    • are philosophers who imagine they know merely from philosophy
    • mistaken if they imagine there is any reality in the I
    • pure fancy to imagine that people lived then in exactly the
    • far as ancient Greece, we would be quite wrong to imagine that
    • physiologists that we imagine colors, but we do not really
    • imagine people saying, “There are ugly flowers and there
    • reality is what is true. Now imagine that the model dies, and
    • of the imagining the movement, not by way of will but by way of
    • imagines. For the number of people unable to cope with life
  • Title: Social Question as a Problem: Lecture I: The Inner Experience of Language
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    • imaginatively, pictorially, when they speak.
    • imaginative conceptions. For the dead understand only what
    • Imaginative conception in the people concerned is
    • significance? Do not most people imagine the spirit—as
    • in imaginative ideas is helped, my dear friends. It is an
    • will again support imaginative thinking. Through forming
    • words that we shell come back to imaginative conception
    • abstractions? You may imagine the concrete sense-conception
    • only rightly experience himself who can imagine himself in
  • Title: Social Question as a Problem: Lecture II: The Inner Experience of Language
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    • to abstract, unimaginative thinking. What must be evolved
    • imaginative conception, Imagination. It is mankind's special
    • of Imagination. I beg of you not to confuse what I am
    • cultivates imagination. Each one of us must seek his own
    • Imagination for esoteric development: but the fault genius
    • cultivates the Imagination from which must come the common
    • spiritual culture of the future. An imaginative spiritual
    • a culture with imaginative conceptions. Our culture must be
    • express oneself through pictures. The life of Imagination in
    • V    Imagination
    • Inspiration is active in the fifth, Imagination is not fully
    • the Imaginative life, and in the life of Inspiration and that
    • the imagination must be cultivated in the emancipated
    • will open out for an imaginative feeling and perception.
    • of the imaginative from speech, because since languages have
    • Imagination then brings about — what has to do with
    • imaginative they have the deepest understanding. But should
    • imaginative form thus produced. When the German word for the
    • That man is a real poet who is alive to the imaginative in
    • to the life of Imagination.
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  • Title: Goetheanism as an Impulse for Man's Transformation - Lecture I: The Difference Between Man and Animal
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    • spiritual world in full consciousness, to develop Imagination, Inspiration,
    • understand. But, my dear friends, we can also imagine that some one may
  • Title: Goetheanism as an Impulse for Man's Transformation - Lecture II: St. John of the Cross
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    • attention from any particular attack that has been made. Let us imagine
    • would be inability to contemplate and to make use of imaginative powers,
    • perceiving that one no longer desired to employ the imaginative power
    • of the senses in special outer and inner imaginations. Thus the first
    • the inability to contemplate and use one's imaginative power, reluctance
    • felt incapable of observing things outwardly and of setting the imaginative
    • perceiving that he no longer desires to use the imaginative power of
    • the senses for special outer or inner imaginations. My dear friends,
  • Title: Goetheanism as an Impulse for Man's Transformation - Lecture III: Clairvoyant Vision Looks at Mineral, Plant, Animal, Man
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    • pressing on so that they come to this change. I am speaking in Imaginations,
    • my dear friends, in Imaginations translated into words. In reality these
    • this Imagination into words) actually so long as they are in a physical
    • would actually constitute our world. Imagine the world looking as it
    • imagine you were taken into a world described in books, where there
    • because an Imagination is being clothed in words) man as a conceiver
  • Title: Goetheanism as an Impulse for Man's Transformation - Lecture 4: Human Qualities Which Oppose Antroposophy
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    • far less liking today for sound human understanding than people imagine,
    • by penetrating directly to the spiritual world in a way that they imagine
  • Title: Goetheanism as an Impulse for Man's Transformation - Lecture 5: Paganism, Hebraism, and the Greek Spirit, Hellenism
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    • only when he is willing to rise above logic to Imagination, Inspiration,
    • would have it. This modern theory of evolution imagines, first, what
    • a special Leader of the people. How in their imagination they would
    • by the imaginative picture realised in the ritual.
    • of the realised imaginations of the ritual. The barbarians' hearts and
  • Title: Goetheanism as an Impulse for Man's Transformation - Lecture 6: Goetheanism as an Impulse for Man's Transformation
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    • that as powerful imagination meet you in The Fairy tale of the Green
    • Beautiful Lily as a mighty Imagination, after passing the Guardian
    • lying in the mighty Imaginations of The Green Snake end the Beautiful
    • of Goethe, with the help of the mighty Imaginations embodied In the
  • Title: Regarding Higher Worlds
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    • of what we can, from an imagination regarding the way we can
    • It's not enough to only imagine the astral and devachanic
    • to imagine that the clairvoyant awareness, when it is turned
    • plane. You can imagine light images in the astral world which
    • difficult to imagine, because you have to think, that the very
    • soul. Just imagine that on the astral plane there is a single
    • through black magic before death allows this entry, you will
  • Title: Goethe's Relationship to his 'Faust'
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    • four faculties, gropes towards magic, and so forth. However,
    • towards magic, Goethe opposes the Faust-tradition; it was not
    • Goethe allows his Faust to open up a book on magic, called the
    • that everything within imagination — acquired through
    • into world knowledge, demanding human imaginative capabilities
    • one imagination to another, from one idea to the next idea in
  • Title: What is Self-knowledge?
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    • in my imagination, my experiences and feelings if this
    • imaginations, thoughts and ideas would this individuality
    • imagination when you reflect about it, how you, from morning to
    • rule, not much can be done when we build an imagination upon
  • Title: The Building at Dornach (Bn/GA 289): Lecture I: The Goetheanum
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    • be found in the imaginative may be cultivated, the element of vision,
    • which is imaginative an intellectual. Put on the other side this has
    • if we rise to imaginative conception. Anyone who is acquainted with
  • Title: The Building at Dornach (Bn/GA 289): Lecture II: Bau Lecture II
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    • with the imagination of the artist. This is the thing that you must
    • of evolution when one has built up in pictures and in imaginations what
    • creates not in intellectual ideas but in pictures and in imaginations.
    • future of mankind. The old world beliefs were developed from imaginations.
    • ideas. Anything fruitful for the future must be born out of an imaginative
    • have only to imagine the principle of growth transforming this pillar
    • as a thing by itself but that the light of the sun is imagined as unity
    • of this Building is imagined as being in unity with the creative powers
    • You have to imagine that
    • these globes. Imagine what would be there if we had not attempted to
  • Title: The Building at Dornach (Bn/GA 289): Lecture III: Lecture 3
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    • follows naturally in contrast to what one generally imagines, i.e. the
    • which may be imagined about it. That which should fill our thought should
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture I: The Problem of Faust
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    • old sciences that he had made his own, lived in magic, in
    • decline. What was accepted as alchemy, as magic, as
    • looking back to the ancient magic, to an older type of
    • he makes his Faust a magician. Faust has given himself up to
    • magic like the Faust of the sixteenth century. But he is
    • of the old magic had already faded away. It was from this
    • whom you know that he has studied the ancient magic wisdom in
    • Faust: “Meseemth he softly coileth magic
    • external. Faust has associated himself with decadent magic;
    • magic. But the spirit does not yield, does not show himself
    • scholar; he has given himself up to magic and through magic
    • of his having added ancient magic to his learning. The
    • magical and mystical wisdom about nature. There are two
    • of an English not that you may imagine out of the ocean. So
    • feelings, nor merely of dogmatic imaginations. Whoever wished
    • meaning man imagines and he has to suffer much on the paths
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture II: The Romantic Walpurgis-Night
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    • obtain information about the mixing of the magic ointment any
    • imagine that when outside he is unable to see another man; he
    • All the magic mount along
    • practice trifling magic arts upon him but, once he was out of
    • commonplace magician able to lead him only to what is
    • blood-red cord is still about her neck. The Imagination has
    • imagination to the vision of the soul of Gretchen who, by
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture III: Goethe's Feeling for the Concrete.
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    • that Goethe's inner imagination develop out of the
    • unimaginative, unobservant nature, from which, often, he
    • pit-goers, looking there, as Goethe imagined it, for
    • Faust has got as far as reaching Helen imaginatively, in his
    • him everywhere. One can well imagine what happens to the mind
    • with the actual can be imagined thatn the note recently sent
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture IV: Faust and the "Mothers"
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    • this world so penetrated by movement — the imaginative world
    • a magician, and must accomplish magical actions. It very
    • biassed notion if one imagines that there lie already formed
    • purely a matter of imaginative knowledge he would only need
    • been said, he has to accomplish magical actions. For that it
    • therefore, you take this imagination of Plutarch's, you have
    • That is at the sane time the imagination for the
    • realistic picture, you need to imagine it thus. Here is the
    • circulation; and if on the other hand you imagine the
    • imagine that all these premontions of mighty connections did
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture V: Faust and the Problem of Evil
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    • Faust sees the picture in the magic looking-glass. Faust, as
    • Witches' Kitchen, in the magic looking-glass, Faust is to a
    • the magic look-glass. As I have often told you, our thoughts
    • which we really experience. Behind all thoughts are Imaginations;
    • we, however, kill the Imaginative part. You can read of it in a
    • magic mirror in the Witches' Kitchen is something which is
    • living in himself, raised up into an Imagination. In ordinary
    • the whole realm of his imaginative life; now he experiences
    • it transformed again to a living Imagination. Thus in the
    • Imagination.
    • it in the magic mirror, he could not have reproduced it
    • magic looking-glass in the Witches' Kitchen. You can perceive
    • transformed into Imagination; it is Feeling that has become
    • Imagination. Here, then, you have the second stage —
    • Feeling that has become Imagination.
    • Imagination.
    • Feeling and Willing, translated into the Imaginative sphere
    • economic proof of the fact that. the imaginary, the unreal,
    • epoch began, the imagination of those, who were sensitive to
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture VI: The Helena Saga and the Riddle of Freedom
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    • working in a magical way, — it was the descendants of
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture VII: Some Spiritual-Scientific Observations
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    • anyone imagine that those ingredients of earth-existence
    • even an Italian, an imaginative force enabling you to think
    • and to supply by means of your imagination what did not
    • imagines what is no longer visible in our present world to be
    • water-air was, we must imagine something having reality also
    • appears to be still in the dream spiritually, in imaginative
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture VIII: Spiritual Science Considered with the Classical Walpurgis-Night
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    • imagine, my dear friends, that anyone like Goethe, who has a
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture IX: Goethe's Life of the Soul from the Standpoint of Spiritual Science
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    • unconscious; he imagines that in my subconscious I am doing
    • imagine, when once this idea of two-sidedness is really
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture X: Faust's Knowledge and Understanding of Himself
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    • Imagination. And he does this first in the Romantic
    • Walpurgis-Night where he takes the Imaginations from ancient
    • Imaginations appearing to different people in different
    • Imaginations in some degree still approached spiritual
    • not wanting to invent an imaginative world himself, calls in
    • must first advance to the world of Imagination, Inspiration,
    • into that other world, the world of Imagination, Inspiration,
    • to attend the ocean-festival. Galatea! and Imagination of a
    • whole macrocosmic world, seething and weaving there. Imagine
    • this force personified, imagine this same force of human
    • seething and weaving there. Imagine this force personified,
    • imagine this same force of human becoming grasped spiritually
    • Dorides. In these Imaginations we are led into a mysterious
    • Imaginations awakened by the Kabiri impulses, by the
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture XI: The Vision of Reality in the Greek Myths
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    • desire was then to take refute in the Imaginations of the
    • as yet, to supersede these by his own Imaginations; therefore
    • can be perceived in Imaginations, in pictures, is therefore
    • body in Imaginations. Unless the abstract idea of Homunculus
    • chosen other paths in the imaginative world. That is why he
    • significant Imagination from the Greek world-conception, in
    • After everything ha been tried through majestic Imaginations
    • we ourselves learn to know the Imaginations which, in the
    • concerning this waking. It may be understood in imagination
  • Title: Problem of Faust: Lecture XII: Goetheanism In Place of Homunculism and Mephistophelianism
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    • darkness. he imagines it will only become clear when he
    • — often imaginary and based on pure illusion —
    • Imaginations, in imaginative pictures.
    • the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. To imagine thus that
    • emphasised that to imagine evolution as proceeding in a
    • Imagine the most highly developed animals with their
    • could I from my path all magic ban”. he did not want
    • external magic, he wanted to find the inner path to the
    • Imagine how Schiller believed that in these letters, written
    • Hamerling imagines as the evolutionary progress of his
  • Title: Anthroposophy as a Demand of the Times
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    • One imagines this whole system which exists in time as somehow
    • natural forces. One imagines physical man then emerging out of
    • — to proceed by imagining things which one knows well
    • imagine symbolically. In this way concepts are by force of will
    • to concrete reality. But when one now rises to imagine symbolic
    • of thinking and imagining and with this to an altogether higher
    • point of view of waking; the dreamer imagines the content of
    • the nature of the illusionary. One knows: You imagine nothing,
    • but you have an imagination. Through this one will also the
    • one truly doesn't imagine anything and is yet as active as one
    • don't imagine anything — but one notices the inner
    • described. — Imagine that at a certain time of day you
    • connects again with the backwards imagined happenings is the
  • Title: The Ten Commandments
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    • to imagine him for themselves as a spiritual light Being.
    • fashion. At most they could imagine this godly Ahura Mazdao as
    • than pictures which your own soul imagines, ‘soul’
    • as is imagined under the concept of the astral body. Osiris
    • imagination of the “I” (Ich). All images,
    • originally given in ancient Indian times with which to imagine
    • members of human nature, so you must imagine the Being who
    • the name “I am the I-am” should you imagine this
    • expression as people then imagined they had heard.
    • “Don't seek to find an incorrect imagination of Me,
    • protect the truth within you, as an imagination of Me, then you
    • gender.” A real medicinal imagination is linked to that
    • which this commandment gave, linked to the imagination that
    • when the human being has a pure imagination of his relationship
    • a false imagination of the Divine, then you will, from gender
    • take up the correct imagination of the Divine, otherwise that
    • true spiritual imagination. Through this a simultaneous breath
    • damagingly in community of life from one “I” to
    • another “I.” A deed penetrates directly, damagingly
  • Title: Way of Knowledge
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    • protected. We do not dare imagine that teaching, imagining and
    • we apply all imaginings which we relate to ourselves, to the
    • base for man and animal. Now bring this imagination into our
    • the physical, and we must not imagine this descent as something
  • Title: Haeckel, "The Riddle of the Universe," Theosophy
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    • man's creative powers. Let us, then, go further, and imagine
    • don't exist! What use have I for such imaginings? One has to
    • his imagination, for it amounts to credulity and superstition
    • will imagine two persons, one morally deficient and
    • know is true, and all higher mathematics are only imaginary
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume III: Lecture I
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    • conception of them if we imagine their mood of soul as though
    • sphere, which is determined when we imagine the earth at a
    • speaking did indeed imagine the receiving of thoughts as a kind
    • fact, as follows: They imagined that they held the thoughts
    • which belongs to the outer air. They imagined that they held
    • us consider for a moment what they imagined. The in-breathing
    • by no means very far behind us. Imagine a Scholastic thinker or
  • Title: Cosmic Forces in Man: Lecture I: Cosmic Forces in Man
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    • this chest-structure imaginatively; it is as if a spherical form had
  • Title: Cosmic Forces in Man: Lecture II: The Soul Life of Man ...
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    • spiritual world. But what Spiritual Science calls Imagination,
  • Title: Spirit of Fichte: Lecture I: The Spirit of Fichte Present in Our Midst
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    • transport ourselves in imagination toRammenau in Oberlausitz, a
    • us just attempt to view him in imagination as he discharges the
    • nothing of practical life!” But it may well be imagined that
    • venture, only imagined in another way.
    • intelligence. Only imagine what a blessing it would mean if such a
    • [“Imagine a world of
  • Title: Lecture: The Christmas Festival In The Changing Course Of Time
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    • It is hardly possible to experience that magic which like a gentle
    • especially for the city dweller, to sense anything of this magic,
    • little of this magic wind which permeated the soul mood in those times
    • child I was able to behold the last remnants of such a magic wind as
    • thing, which had spread through centuries like a magic breath of air
    • the following rules. — Try to imagine life in these villages, and
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 1 of 9
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    • arise when — imagining we can understand them — we
    • proofs and scientific arguments. Let us imagine all that Socrates
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 2 of 9
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    • imagination, of feeling and will — these too must not be
    • of external sense reality. They imagine that concepts and ideas and
    • to be, since you imagined that the ideas had come into your soul from
    • all dogmatic wisdom must be laid aside. We can imagine Krishna saying
    • something winter-like in waking up — not as one might imagine,
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 3 of 9
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    • from what we imagine. It is just this difference that now becomes
    • different beings from what we imagine ourselves to be in everyday
    • world. If some people imagine that they no longer take any special
    • grossest illusions, will be misled by such imaginings. After all, man
    • flesh-pots of Egypt. Let us not imagine that it is an easy thing to
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 4 of 9
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    • in the ordinary world. Though we often imagine that we see light, in
    • has been able to perceive on the physical plane. So he may imagine
    • light-air. He imagines that he sees the different incarnations of
    • outlook can imagine that good beings alone could bring about the
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 5 of 9
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    • his nature as deeply as we might imagine. We could expect people who
    • Just imagine someone trying to speak before such an audience as this,
    • the age now beginning. Mankind, imagining life to be enclosed between
    • Let us imagine a man of
    • will reach hundreds of people who will imagine that they understand
    • Now let us imagine that
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 6 of 9
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    • accustomed to color and brightness, so he imagines he will only reach
    • super-sensible illustrations so to say, are Imaginations. The
    • thing — a peculiar difficulty in imagining and bringing to life
    • Imagination. Then the uplifted and strengthened soul-force that
    • belongs not to the realm of the intellect but to imaginative
    • in Imaginations. This is where the majesty of description in this
    • in a picture, in an Imagination.
    • realize it the Imagination of Krishna as Arjuna now describes it will
    • narrator, and describes his Imagination in words so wonderful that
    • Such is the Imagination
    • where an Imagination of Krishna is possible. Then we hear what
    • and spirit of such a mighty Imagination as that of Arjuna presented
    • that do not belong to the individual alone. Imagine a person feeling
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 7 of 9
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    • Let us imagine we have
    • will find it difficult to imagine this “less than nothing.”
    • real factor on all sides. We must imagine the world that surrounds
    • tells us, we have to imagine a kind of embodiment, though much concealed in
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 8 of 9
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    • appalling misunderstandings can arise when people imagine they can
    • Let us imagine that
    • peculiarly grotesque picture. We imagine those founders of Indian
    • flowed. Let us imagine the man
    • imagination of dream-life — was in that ancient time the normal
    • depths of the future for them. I mean what we call Imaginative
    • sense of the ego; fully conscious Imagination as it is described in
    • Now imagine how
    • scientists spin their threads of thought so far as to imagine they
    • Let us imagine that a
  • Title: Occult Significance of the Bhagavad Gita: Lecture 9 of 9
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    • somewhat as follows. Imagine a primitive country man who sees the
    • the Imagination appear before us. On the one side the Imagination of
    • justification. No one must imagine that the Krishna impulse could
  • Title: Mysteries of the East: Lecture 1
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    • significant experience. Imagine a man coming to the boundary he has
  • Title: Mysteries of the East: Lecture 2
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    • imagination — there are many more such than is generally supposed
    • do not let us imagine that anyone who has become a seer must forfeit
  • Title: Mysteries of the East: Lecture 4
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    • preserved the worst forces of oriental magic (not the best forces,
    • Mohammedan Lucifer, and with her the evil magician Klingsor united his
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture II: The Mission of Manicheism
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    • tremendous power of expansion. The magic power of thought is of the
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture IV: Involution and Evolution
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    • Nature are, in fact, already contained in her being. He imagines that
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture VI: Yoga In East and West (conclusion)
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    • for it by the loss of clairvoyance. Imagine to yourself a green
    • These four sentences have magical power. But we must bring them to
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture VII: The Gospel of St. John
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    • magical power — a fact well known to occultists. By repeating these
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture VIII: The Christian Mystery
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    • imagine that we are leaving a turbulent city behind us and entering
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture IX: The Astral World
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    • imagination of the punishment of Tantalus in Greek Mythology. There is
    • is the origin of black magic. The earthly commandment, Thou shalt
    • The white magician would impart to other souls the spiritual life he
    • bears within him. The black magician has the urge to kill, to create a
    • That is why the first sentence on the tables of black magic is: Life
    • magic the followers are taught the horrible and diabolical practice of
    • between black magic and vivisection. On account of its materialism,
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture X: The Astral World (continued)
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    • the higher part giving rise to thought, imagination, speech.
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture XII: The Devachanic World (continued)
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    • from all others. Let us imagine these words congealing somewhat as water
    • And now, instead of a process of densification, let us imagine the
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture XIII: The Logos and the Word
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    • Consciousness in pictures (imaginative) created its own inner content
    • The existence of this imaginative consciousness is the answer to
    • is by nature plastic and has magical power. (This is indicated by the
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture XIV: The Logos and Man
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    • Imagine that a tiny insect crawling on the body of a man could see
    • followed the stage of imaginative consciousness? If such a
    • — “Imagine,” they said, “that while retaining his
    • A consciousness which repeats the third stage but retains the acquired quality of objectivity. Images have definite colours and are realised as being quite distinct from the perceiver. The subjective sense of attraction or repulsion vanishes. In this new imaginative consciousness, the faculty of reason that has been acquired in the physical world retains its own powers.
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture XV: The Evolution of Planets and Earth
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    • communicate images to the air. The word will then be an Imagination
    • with a dreamlike, imaginative consciousness. We can envisage the kind
  • Title: Esoteric Cosmology: Lecture XVI: Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Human Will
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    • manifestation. Let us imagine a substance which is heated to a high
    • condition will dawn of conscious astral imagination during a period
    • independent of the physical body and astral imaginative vision will
    • form-earth, It is endowed with a remarkable property. Let us imagine a
    • as black magic, that is, a magic founded on egoism. (See diagram)
  • Title: First Lecture: The Gospel of St. John
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    • Imagine that you are bound with fetters and you break loose.
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture II: The Three Worlds
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    • all that he thought and imagined as he was leading his legions; and
    • The spiritualist imagines he is seeing a man who has died, when it is
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture V: Human Tasks in the Higher Worlds
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    • We must not imagine that
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture VI: The Upbringing of Children. Karma.
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    • imagination a chance to be active.
    • Let us imagine two people:
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture VIII: Good and Evil. Individual Karmic Questions.
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    • further idea. Imagine that ancient condition of humanity when nothing
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture IX: Evolution of the Earth
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    • But we must not imagine seven successive Globes; it is always the same
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture XI: The Post-Atlantean Culture-Epochs
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    • have your black instruments with all kinds of little magic signs”
    • his God teaches is very different from what your magical black signs
    • thought-pictures, in visions and imaginations that the world of Brahman
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture XIII: Oriental and Christian Training
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    • observances, the more exalted does he imagine himself to be. The Hindu
  • Title: At the Gates: Lecture XIV: Rosicrucian Training - The Interior of the Earth - Earthquakes and Volcanoes
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    • You must not imagine that
    • who want to achieve something cannot wait; they imagine they are already
    • we find only the lower self, the fourth principle, which imagines itself
    • 2. Imagination
    • or Imaginative Knowledge is the second thing we have to attain. What
    • qualities, the more easily shall we attain to Imaginative Knowledge.
    • on these exercises we can pass to exercises of real Imagination. Take,
    • All this stimulates the Imagination, and by this means the pupil
    • later on be in reality. These are exercises of the Imagination; by their
    • This is the substance through whose influence black magic arises in
    • When white magic triumphs, no evil remains on Earth. Human evolution
  • Title: Pastoral Medicine: Lecture 3
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    • imagination presents), the cherub plunges his sword in, draws it out,
    • degenerated to a superstitious worship of relics and belief in magic.
    • biographies of such individuals, including their own imaginative
    • through the experiences of such people in their own imagination. And
    • is imagined — and indeed, the line has to be thick —
    • responsibility is one of the deepest problems imaginable.
  • Title: Pastoral Medicine: Lecture 6
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    • karmic effects. They stream into fanciful imaginations that even
  • Title: Pastoral Medicine: Lecture 9
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    • imaginative experience, and by which we are able to experience the
  • Title: Pastoral Medicine: Lecture 10
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    • “black magic.” Such things are the cause of both soul
  • Title: Pastoral Medicine: Lecture 11
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  • Title: Broken Vessels: Lecture 3
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    • imagination presents), the cherub plunges his sword in, draws it out,
    • degenerated to a superstitious worship of relics and belief in magic.
    • biographies of such individuals, including their own imaginative
    • through the experiences of such people in their own imagination. And
    • is imagined — and indeed, the line has to be thick —
    • responsibility is one of the deepest imaginable. We will see what
  • Title: Broken Vessels: Lecture 6
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    • karmic effects. They stream into fanciful imaginations that even
  • Title: Broken Vessels: Lecture 9
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    • imaginative experience, and by which we are able to experience the
  • Title: Broken Vessels: Lecture 10
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    • “black magic.” Such things are the cause of both soul
  • Title: Broken Vessels: Lecture 11
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  • Title: Genesis: Lecture I
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    • enabled the soul to call up imaginal pictures which were not wholly
    • us imagine that from this substantial habitation, woven of the
    • ourselves through material images. Let us imagine that we have before
    • with the help of warmth, air and water. Let us try to imagine this!
    • image of the living weaving of spirit in a kind of matter; imagine
    • coagulation, the physical densification of our earth. Let us imagine
    • own inner being! Imagine yourselves as having been asleep for a
    • soul-content from the depths of the soul as if by magic. If you like
    • thinking, try to imagine cosmic thinking-then you have the content of
    • And now imagine that
    • through inner reflection. Now imagine, instead of the human soul, the
    • capacities can be used.” Let us then imagine such p. group of
  • Title: Genesis: Lecture II
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    • So that we have to imagine the elements warmth, air and water
    • imagined an enormous sphere, a hollow sphere, with yourself inside
    • its centre. Thus you imagine a point within space whence forces
    • question in this way. Let us think of an animal form, and imagine
  • Title: Genesis: Lecture III
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    • must not imagine that there were plants on the old Sun in their
    • an upward direction. Imagine a gaseous sphere, and within it weaving
  • Title: Genesis: Lecture VII
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    • distrust of them. The early stages of these imaginal representations
  • Title: Genesis: Lecture VIII
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    • imagines, could not even be accepted by superficial ratiocination if
    • gaseous element, and to imagine only that part of the man you are
    • today which pulsates in the warmth of your blood. Imagine your
    • imagine that the Beings whom we have described as Luciferic
  • Title: Genesis: Lecture X
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    • utterly absurd to imagine that an animal form can be transformed into
  • Title: Festivals/Easter: Lecture V: The Teachings of The Risen Christ
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    • thinking of a certain kind — dream-like, imaginative, but still,
    • periods of human evolution it was different. To imagine that coming
    • Now let us imagine that those early, divine Teachers of humanity
    • through cognition which, rising to Imaginative knowledge, and then to
  • Title: Festivals/Easter: Lecture VI: Easter: The Mystery of the Future
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    • illusion, vain imagination. And those who have experienced most ably,
  • Title: Faith, Love, Hope: The Third Revelation
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    • their evolution will look upon it merely as imagination run wild or as
    • world-conception. They did not say what people imagine they would have
  • Title: Faith, Love, Hope: Towards the Sixth Epoch
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    • death is not the sudden leap imagined by those knowing nothing about
    • back as far as is usually imagined. Only a few incarnations ago, men
    • language through which verbal teaching could exert the magical effects
    • greater than it is possible to conceive to-day — a magical moral
    • magically, the nature of the Mystery of Golgotha. Hence in this
  • Title: Forming of Destiny: Lecture 2: On the forming of Destiny
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    • it is especially good to hold before the soul as imaginative pictures
    • consciousness that the world is within us. Just imagine that for a
    • activity is necessary if the imagination is to appear. I know the
    • being is there, but I have first to create the imagination by uniting
    • being very active himself; of the other, through an imagination
    • to the way in which there arises the imagination of the soul which he
  • Title: Forming of Destiny: Lecture 3: The Subconscious Strata of the Soul-Life and the Life of the Spirit After Premature Death
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    • must be brought into an ‘Imagination.’ That which is
    • to create the ‘imagination’ of them, if they were to know
    • We must always bear in mind that we should not imagine men living on
    • imagination may picture the dead as we last saw them here, but that is
    • imaginative vision of everything human than one who enters the
  • Title: Forming of Destiny: Lecture 4: The Connection Between the Spiritual and the Physical Worlds, and How They Are Experienced After Death
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    • imagination, unless something had been added to physical existence; it
  • Title: Forming of Destiny: Lecture 5: Concerning the Subconscious Soul Impulses
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    • similarly, when the spiritual world reveals itself, the imagination
    • occurred to the examining magistrate who made the enquiry, that there
    • everything, and in the preliminary trial before the magistrate was so
    • sagacity truly astounding, that the magistrate, a very efficient,
    • verdict was exactly the opposite to that expected by the magistrate,
    • much scarcer than the sensational minds of the public imagine. Less
    • events recapitulated themselves in imagination with lightning speed.
    • who happened to be the soft-hearted magistrate who at the time had
  • Title: Forming of Destiny: Lecture 6: Lecture on the Poem of Olaf Ĺsteson
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    • thinking. I can imagine very clever men reading such a book and
    • he could only imagine that one comes through the letters of the
    • glacier in the night. You may imagine what an impression that makes on
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture I
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    • (Imagination). But it is only through mental vision (Inspiration) that
    • consciousness. One can imagine a lofty being who has put forth from
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture II
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    • death. Many of the practices of black magicians consisted in their
    • magicians to allow nobody to have his etheric body worked into unless
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture III
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    • we are in a position to develop this consciousness and imagine
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture V
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    • most imagination. Later he will have magical power. This is the
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture VI
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    • difference. Let us imagine that man were to be in a position to create
    • Let us imagine for once that man were able to bring forth sounds,
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture VII
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    • imagine a jelly-like being which had freed itself from what had come
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture VIII
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    • Let us for instance imagine ourselves back into the time about 600 to
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XIV
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    • Let us imagine ourselves in the soul of someone living between two
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XV
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    • created are still full of the magic of the sacred primaeval language.
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XVI
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    • And now let us imagine a person whose actions, thoughts and feelings
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XVII
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    • The three stages of thought-life: Abstract Thoughts, Imagination, and
    • this thought a spiritual being is present. If we imagine ourselves
    • the mystics the counter-image is called Imagination. Thus we have
    • three levels of the thought element: the intuitive, the imaginative
    • us in our thoughts. Imagination gives the picture. This is why the
    • imagination gives the picture, not abstract thoughts. In all
    • must think in pictures, in images; that means ‘to imagine’. In this
    • power to make an imprint in something, (to imagine).’ In creative
    • reflection of imagination. When a man who is seeking higher
    • Through Imagination a man allows himself to be fructified by the
    • formative spirit within him. Imagination corresponds to hidden
    • mediums also speak in imaginations, in pictures and symbols, but
    • Intuitions. Behind all language Beings of Imagination are working and
    • same spiritual level are at work. Behind all plants Imaginations are
    • active. The completed form of the plant comes forth from Imagination
    • Behind everything living stands the Spirit of Imagination. It is the
    • or Christ. He is the Spirit who lives as imagination in everything
    • but what has life. In the world of life the Imaginations about which
    • have to consider everything which belongs in any way to Imagination.
    • the Imaginative understanding which first enables them to look into
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  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XIX
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    • Christ, the ascending Buddhi-Principle — Black and White Magic.
    • magician draws his most powerful forces out of the morass of
    • sensuality. The purpose of sexual rites is to introduce such magic
    • signifies a growing increase of power. In schools of Black Magic
    • (What corresponds to this in the case of the White Magician is
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XX
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    • Beings and experiences in the Astral World. Black and White Magic.
    • we must certainly not imagine that because of this only physical
    • magician with his pupils. In order to train himself to become a black
    • magician, the pupil has to go through a special schooling. The
    • training in black magic consists in a person becoming accustomed,
    • Now the basic principle of all white magic is that no power can be
    • are united. To be a black magician means to develop more and more the
    • on the astral plane the black magician with his pupils. One also finds
    • should not disregard. Let us imagine that in this life someone were to
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XXI
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    • occultists an extraordinary magical power. Even in the plant world one
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XXV
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    • into astral space. On this depends the conjurings of magicians. They
    • imagines a world filled with such thought-seeds. This formless world
    • imagines the human being as merely a being of thought, then one can
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XXVI
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    • we limit ourselves as far as possible to what is physical and imagine
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XXVII
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    • Ceremonial magic is the lowest kind of sorcery and consists in making
    • today in which ceremonial magic is still exercised. Such usages cause
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XXVIII
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    • not yet opened to the outer world. We must imagine the same force
  • Title: Lecture: Foundations of Esotericism: Lecture XXIX
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    • up the illness. The black magician can make use of this knowledge to
  • Title: Lecture: The Four Temperaments
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    • here a kind of magic word, and we must do everything we can to awaken
    • will be lost. The magic potion for the choleric child is respect and
    • different magic formula may be applied. For the sanguine child this
  • Title: Lecture: The Human Spirit and the Animal Spirit
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    • less subtle, I shall speak figuratively. Let us imagine that what man
    • within him — let us imagine all this working together out of
    • three, aspects. Let us therefore imagine the ego to be eliminated,
    • the very beginning determines balance in the animal. And imagine the
    • But imagine it was no longer kept in reserve for individual life but
    • experience of the spirit, as it is seen in the imaginative creations
    • should have to imagine that man experiences sadness in his soul
    • is there — actually there. I have imagined it in connection
  • Title: Lecture I: Human Questions and Cosmic Answers
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    • cosmos, consists in being able to wait, in not imagining that answers
    • rays of the sun penetrate down to earth, and we fondly imagine that
  • Title: Lecture II: Human Questions and Cosmic Answers
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    • goes no farther than this primal nebula. Now let us imagine that not
    • could obviously not be imagined to exist in the space it occupies, I
    • Imagine the whole of our solar system filled with the Mercury-forces.
  • Title: Lecture III: Human Questions and Cosmic Answers
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    • expression in the activities of imagination, of
    • the pictures of imagination, only they arise as faithful reproductions
    • of the corresponding experiences. Therefore we can say: Imagination or
    • outwards from a single point, but we must imagine the point dispersed.
    • Phantasy, Imagination, Memory
  • Title: Lecture IV: Human Questions and Cosmic Answers
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    • plant-world, we must imagine this astral element of the plant-world as
    • importance; it must not be imagined, for example, that the
    • him: It is certainly not, as you imagine, the gross lead-substance
  • Title: Initiation/Passing Moment: Lecture I
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    • those who can imagine how, in the course of man's evolution on earth
    • through the wide spaces of the macrocosm?” Try to imagine the
    • human form. On the other hand, now try to imagine how, in speaking of
  • Title: Initiation/Passing Moment: Lecture II
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    • leaders of the Chinese religion. Imagine men of this kind entering the
  • Title: Initiation/Passing Moment: Lecture III
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    • can imagine. Yes, indeed, the super-sensible world is always able to
  • Title: Initiation/Passing Moment: Lecture IV
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    • Imagine that you go to sleep and that you know, “My body is lying
    • imagine that you stand there with all that is innermost in your soul,
  • Title: Initiation/Passing Moment: Lecture V
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    • imagining that when one selflessly and in the right way reaches the
    • quite wrong to imagine that there one went about looking at the beings
    • imagine that after the first steps on the path of initiation he will
    • this fundamental feeling. Imagine someone standing here in the middle
    • One can imagine, therefore, a being belonging to a higher hierarchical
    • before” — it must be imagined that you are standing opposite
    • Just imagine this wish, this feeling, experienced in the spiritual
    • hardly imagine that you would find it described anywhere. You can,
  • Title: Initiation/Passing Moment: Lecture VI
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    • Just imagine that somewhere, on some island or other, there were a
    • can make in their view of the world is that of imagining that they can
  • Title: Initiation/Passing Moment: Lecture VII
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    • lively imagination, you may be able to form some sort of picture from
    • people. It is impossible to imagine a Buddhist, for instance, writing
    • imagines that man thinks with his brain; that is simply an error. If
  • Title: Inner Nature of Man: Lecture 1: The Four Spheres of the Inner Life
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    • extent we have become the world. Only imagine what a reversal of the
    • forward; he imagines that he does this for his own pleasure. In order
  • Title: Inner Nature of Man: Lecture 2: The Vision of the Ideal Human Being
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    • of memory helps us to leave the body. Imagination is not bound by
    • In fact, when Imagination begins
    • between the memories appear pictures, imaginations of something we
    • Imagination. Although we cannot there develop a religion by
  • Title: Inner Nature of Man: Lecture 3: The Senses and the Luciferic Temptation
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    • light and colour. With this comes Imagination, Inspiration, Intuition
    • allow Imagination, Inspiration, Intuition to enter; Lucifer otherwise
    • Ahriman's action prevents our using Imagination, Inspiration,
    • Imagination, Inspiration, Intuition is what we have gone through in
    • becomes like the corpse of the colour. Imagine that whenever we
    • world occultly through Imaginations, through creative images. The
    • Imagination, and within this again is revealed Inspiration, and
    • Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition.
    • surface of the sensation of colour, — creative Imagination,
    • Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition were really to enter our
    • temptation of Lucifer. This Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition
    • consciousness, and does not allow Imagination, Inspiration and
    • sends in his Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition, and the
    • Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition within us and we should rise
    • experienced the perceptions which pass into it from Imaginations,
    • the surface, we should see before us the ‘Imagination’ of
    • exactly the same manner, and Imaginations, Inspirations and
    • Imaginations, Inspirations and Intuitions were not so entirely
    • so organised that the Imaginations hidden within the
    • Imagination; so that to the people belonging to the ancient Egyptian
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  • Title: Inner Nature of Man: Lecture 5: Between Death and the 'Cosmic Midnight Hour'
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    • imagination. From the standpoint of inwardness the experience is
    • elementals which appear before our soul as mighty Imaginations. In
  • Title: Inner Aspect of the Social Question: Lecture I
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    • men with their own powers, and breathing imaginations into the human
    • establishes a personal relationship with him, an imagination of the
  • Title: Inner Aspect of the Social Question: Lecture II
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    • imagine itself to be God-given ... the truth to which all religious
    • imagine that it were possible for us to be entirely absorbed in
    • is to do this by depriving youth of the imaginative education which
  • Title: Inner Aspect of the Social Question: Lecture III
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    • evil spirit! Imagine a great thinker, knowing nothing of our time and
    • exuberant imagination would he be able to conceive such a world as
    • One glance at the war: can you imagine a human reason which could
    • external object. Imagine a being who comes from a planet with a
    • And you get this answer: One can imagine them first in a different
  • Title: First Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • illustrate by outer drawings, we might equally well imagine purely in
    • the mind. Indeed it is very good for us to imagine more of these
    • “real” phenomena of Nature. Say I imagine an object to be
    • Ia). I am not looking at any moving object; I just imagine it.
    • Then I can always imagine this movement from a to
    • get to b. Thus I can also imagine the movement from
    • try to work out a mechanics of molecules and atoms; for they imagine
    • imagined that by so doing they would at last contrive to explain all
    • Diagrammatically, let us here imagine that we are setting out to
    • ends of the Universe and imagine forces to the working inward from
  • Title: Second Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • imagine therefore into this space beyond the prism not only the light
  • Title: Third Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • thing to imagine, no doubt, but that is what they said. And when we
  • Title: Fourth Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • light into its constituents. Newton now imagined that to every colour
    • even tried to imagine which of the substances emit relatively larger
    • movement in the ether. And, to begin with, they imagined that light
    • expansion, known as waves, we imagine sound to spread. To begin with,
  • Title: Fifth Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • You may imagine therefore: Say you have gradually filled the dark
    • of the body, and, to begin with, you will imagine rather crudely.
  • Title: Sixth Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • from the luminous object. (We are imagining the eye to be looking in
    • — imagining the ether as an inherently elastic substance. So
  • Title: Seventh Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • come to imagine that the light is there at work quite outside us;
  • Title: Eighth Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • imagine the sound penetrating here in the form of air-waves and
  • Title: Ninth Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • they imagined — though to begin with surely there is no cause
    • quite akin to the spreading of waves, or to what could be imagined
    • generally imagines wave-movements to spread out. Even as light
    • extent. For sound and light, they were imagining wave-trains,
    • they had begun to imagine wave-movements, since the phenomena of
    • same of electricity; the waves had only to be imagined long by
    • imagined material particles to be shooting through the space inside
    • extreme attenuation, he imagined, the matter that is left inside
    • such a tube, they now imagined there to be two different kinds of
    • Formerly, he says, we tried to imagine in all kinds of ways, how
  • Title: Tenth Lecture (First Scientific Lecture-Course)
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    • last three decades have in fact been revolutionary. One can imagine
    • element of matter. For you can imagine that a bombardment is taking
    • imagined.
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 1: The World Behind the Tapestry of Sense-perceptions. Ecstasy and Mystical Experience.
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    • this world has been magically conjured up before him as delusion, or
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 3: The Inner Path Followed by the Mystic. Experience of the Cycle of the Year.
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    • Let nobody imagine that Spiritual Science demands that a man living an
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 5: The Egyptian Mysteries of Osiris and Isis
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    • investigation and are based upon the deepest imaginable foundations.
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 6: Experiences of Initiation in the Northern Mysteries
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    • world does he imagine that behind this world there exist all kinds of
    • consciousness to develop is a picture-consciousness, Imaginative
    • Consciousness. This Imaginative Consciousness remains mere phantasy
    • (Urbilderwelt). Whatever can arise as true Imagination is a
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 7: The Four Spheres of the Higher Worlds
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    • Imagination. We shall show that the forces which form the organs in
    • man for Imaginative consciousness come from the World of Archetypal
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 8: Mirror-images of the Macrocosm in Man. Rosicrucian Symbols.
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    • on waking in the morning must not be imagined as though the Ego merely
    • Science, starting from Imaginative Knowledge, creates such an
    • attained Imaginative Knowledge through the development of the
    • Imaginative and Inspired Knowledge into the World of Spirit into which
    • our way to the stage of Imaginative Knowledge, we already stand in the
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 9: Organs of Spiritual Perception. Contemplation of the Ego from Twelve Vantage-points. The Thinking of the Heart.
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    • of soul, man rises to Imaginative Knowledge, Knowledge through
    • degree of vision. When Imaginative Knowledge is actually attained, it
    • symbol as a true Imagination or interpret it arbitrarily; but he will
    • way that the Imaginative world plays a part in the experience, must
    • ascends into the Imaginative world must acquire another quality that
    • circumstance that in trying to enter into the realm of Imagination,
    • arrive at a quite different Imagination, yet immediate feeling again
    • confusing to one who is entering the world of Imagination. But the
    • our Ego itself in the Imaginative world.
    • through the training described we enter the Imaginative world and see
    • genuine mysticism springs from the capacity to have Imaginations, to
    • the Imaginative world; there he has the impression, let us say, of
    • only perceive error but experience it in the Imaginative world with
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 10: Transformation of Soul-forces and Stages in the Evolution of Physical Organs. Reading in the Akasha Chronicle.
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    • his present form he can be imagined only on the Earth. Anyone who
    • way than they actually are. Imagine the Earth only slightly altered
  • Title: Macrocosm/Microcosm: Lecture 11: Man and Planetary Evolution
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    • to the prevailing planetary conditions. But you can well imagine that
    • warmth must be acquired. We cannot even imagine our present fire or
    • burning substance. But on Old Saturn there was no air or gas. Imagine
  • Title: Man/Being/Spirit/Soul: Lecture I: Man as a Being of Spirit and Soul
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    • imagined. It is just the same with the way people look at the
    • being of man. It is imagined that we have to find two elements,
    • imagination. We have to realize that so-called mysticism,
    • thought follows another, our thinking and imaginative
    • into his thinking and power of imagination. Again and
    • illustration. Imagine a person living in a semi-sleeping state
    • into spiritual spheres and which should be imagined as already
    • our thinking and imagination, that lives in what happens in our
    • results that cannot in any way be imagined on the basis of what
    • the striving to guide the will into our thought and imaginative
    • the guidance of the will into the thought and imaginative
  • Title: Man/Being/Spirit/Soul: Lecture II: The Psychological Expression of the Unconscious
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    • the normal way of imagining and thinking.
    • categories. We should imagine for once how we should deal with
    • everything were individual. And we should imagine what human
    • the utmost care imaginable. He then describes how the
    • clear the significant factor I wish to express. Imagine that
    • others. Imagine that we would succeed in getting rid of this so
  • Title: Man/Being/Spirit/Soul: Lecture III: The Science of the Spirit and Modern Questions
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    • Ancient World, where it was imagined that the earth stands
    • I have called these Imaginations. We have pictures which
    • become aware that these Imaginations are related to something
    • When we are able to imagine what kind of living spirit-
    • artistic way of perception, in real Imagination. We are not
    • to imaginative perception. Then the riddle of true human
    • cannot imagine how absolutely real the new kind of art can
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture I
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    • is easy to imagine the feelings that impelled Cusanus to take this
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture II
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    • Magical mysticism extends from there to Meister Eckhart and Nicholas
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture III
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    • analytical mathematician in such a way that I draw or imagine the
    • Where is the human factor if I imagine an abstract point somewhere in
    • has that of the blood. Try to picture vividly what I mean. Imagine
    • to him. Imagine what this implies: Man tears mathematics free from
    • are centered. Is it imaginable that in the seventh or eighth century,
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture IV
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    • said as a matter of history. Imagine yourself back in the age when
    • himself when he imagines that he is experiencing it.
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture V
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    • reality. When the shape of a cannon is imagined, one can hardly say:
    • identification was directed outward and the imagined form of the
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture VII
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    • person who weighs as much as you do. Imagine that you carry this
    • as it were, imagined into them, since what one sees is not force; the
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture VIII
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    • chemistry (see Figure 1.) Try to imagine how the physics and
    • thinking, feeling, willing, as well as memory, imagination, and so
  • Title: Origins of Natural Science: Lecture IX
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    • an epoch that has begun must find a way to continue. You can imagine
    • present-day physiology. You can well imagine this, because it works
    • I could well imagine the following view of the future: Man looks out
    • wealth of ethical actions, that will create new worlds. I can imagine
    • I can imagine that these two images merge. On the one hand, man goes
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture I
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    • Imagine you have a vessel filled with water of a definite temperature,
    • confused. Do not imagine for a moment that this is of no consequence.
    • analogous manner to light because we are one with the heat. Imagine
    • than we imagine them to be when we carry over the observable into the
    • not reversible, such as the plant processes. We cannot imagine a
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture II
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    • imagine thickness added to the surface, this thickness must be treated
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture III
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    • single dimension represented by points a, b, c, and d? Imagine
    • temperature. Imagine for a moment ordinary space. In this ordinary
    • line. But we cannot under any circumstances imagine heat propagated
    • has another bearing. Imagine for a moment that I have a line. This
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture IV
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    • Imagine to yourselves that physicists would so present these matters
    • heat being.” Imagine the temperature were to be raised a couple
    • with it, and the same thing applies if you imagine it lowered several
    • said sometimes that if we imagine our eyes were electrically sensitive
    • Imagine to yourselves that everything above this line is in
    • until tomorrow. Imagine we were not living men, but living rainbows,
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture V
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    • endeavored to illustrate this by asking you to imagine yourselves
    • imagine you recited a poem in an unknown language, then you have
    • the possibility imaginable, at least, that a person could mechanically
    • picture-like and they have to be translated out of the imaginative
    • brought into the outer world which is not grasped by the imaginative
    • imagination, then the abstract ideas must be completely altered,
    • of imaginative thought. This realm of imaginative thought has in us
    • enter the realm of the imaginative, we leave space. We are then no
    • we raise ourselves to imaginative concepts, we really take a step
    • further on the path of imaginative thinking. Suppose you have really
    • begun to think imaginatively. You will then experience something that
    • The moment a person advances somewhat from imaginative to
    • extremely interesting fashion. For, imagine to yourselves the solid
    • realm of imagination. We will go into the matter a little more deeply,
    • to pass over into the spiritual when we enter the imaginative realm,
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture VI
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    • imagined surface. We may now ask the question, where in reality is
    • speaking of is a thing of tremendous import. For, imagine to
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture VII
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    • yesterday. When you picture the air to yourselves and imagine it cut
    • Imagine now, that we were as human beings able to live on a fluid
    • negative gravity. Indeed we find this, we do not have to imagine it.
    • directed. And now we come to a rather difficult idea. Imagine to
    • tetrahedron is put through this transformation, you must imagine to
    • within it is gaseous. With this outside space filled you must imagine
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture VIII
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    • contained in these factors. Imagine for a moment that I am so clumsy
    • you begin with a definitely formed body, then imagine it to become
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture IX
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    • though I should say the following: we can imagine in the cosmos heat
    • can also imagine heat conditions where very low temperatures prevail.
    • red end of the spectrum. But we can imagine the spectrum in its
    • other colors. When we can imagine the circle to become larger and
    • imagine that we pass through first the fluid and then the solid
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture X
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    • aggregation, imagine that the two ends of the series do not disappear
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture XI
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    • twelve color series which must be possible? Imagine to yourselves that
    • filled with suction effects. Imagine that we have projected out into
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture XII
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    • Imagine that we have a body bounded by a definite wall, say of metal
    • right angles to the imagined chemical action-heat lines and between
    • relation between positive and negative numbers and imaginary numbers.
    • at the same time, you have to use imaginary numbers — your
    • imaginary numbers. But now we have already made the following
    • and Strakesch, namely the super-imaginary number. You will
    • controversy about these super-imaginary numbers. They are readily
    • the super-imaginary numbers. Nevertheless we put them into the series
    • meets one in the consideration of super-imaginary numbers also meets
    • imaginary numbers, we speak of the light ether. You see here an
  • Title: Warmth Course: Lecture XIII
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    • were, in the gaseous, pictures of pictures of the X realm. Imagine
    • to say that we have to imagine the whole cosmic spectrum as closed
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture I: The Three Steps of Anthroposophy
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • and which give in a dilettante manner all kinds of imagined knowledge
    • and volition. One cannot imagine thinking, feeling and volition
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture II: Exercises of Thought, Feeling and Volition
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • super-sensible knowledge in the condition of ‘imaginative
    • stage of ‘imaginative cognition’. This is life in the
    • This ‘imaginative knowledge’ is the means whereby we can
    • can only come into being by means of this imaginative knowledge. And
    • ‘imaginative’ experience in a form which springs from
    • Thus we reach the heart of Philosophy by imaginative cognition, of
    • to the unconsciously imagined, inspired and intuitive knowledge,
    • thought in which the subject matter was laid as open as Imagination
    • clairvoyance in Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition; and this
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture III: Methods of Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive Knowledge or Cognition
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    • Lecture III: Methods of Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive Knowledge
    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • METHODS OF IMAGINATIVE, INSPIRED AND INTUITIVE KNOWLEDGE OR COGNITION
    • consciousness when it enters upon imaginative knowledge. His
    • man who uses his imagination correctly. The child has not yet
    • his consciousness. He can learn to do this through Imagination.
    • ‘imaginative philosopher’ is again a small child, but
    • This spiritual outlook, thus attained, differs from the imaginative.
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture IV: Exercises of Cognition and Will
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • exercise of banishing the imaginative pictures more and more. Through
    • power of obliterating the imaginative pictures grows ever greater, and
    • soul's imagination, feeling and will. But we acquire also through it
    • the idea of the true nature of this imaginative presentation; for in
    • influenced through it, can be acquired only through the imaginative,
    • when an old dream-like Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition still
    • A true Cosmology can arise again only when imaginative, inspired and
    • only by a recognition of the imaginative, inspired and intuitive
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture V: Experiences of the Soul in Sleep
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • The imaginative, inspired and intuitive knowledge which has been
    • to imagine, to feel, and to will, it joins up in its memory with those
    • Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition. They do not appear in the
    • Taken up into the imaginative consciousness, this experience becomes
    • the imaginative, inspired and intuitive consciousness. If, for
    • actual soul-process which is imaginatively revealed as longing.
    • the imaginative consciousness if this latter is clouded by dreams
    • imaginative picturing of a longing but a vaguely-felt reliving through
    • ‘Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition’ lift up that which
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture VI: Transference from the Psycho-Spiritual to the Physical Sense-life in man's Development
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • achieve as an inner reality by fully conscious imaginative treatment
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture VII: The Relationship of Christ with Humanity
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture VIII: The Event of Death and Its Relationship with the Christ
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • passing through not-thinking and arriving at imagining, one
    • the ‘imaginative’ consciousness knows the activity which the
    • continues to be kept side by side with the ‘imaginative’.
    • imagination but with an experience of a visionary kind.
    • the old, as in imagination, but it is changed; the old content cannot
    • ‘imagination’ has his ordinary self next to him, as it were;
    • this. Imaginative knowledge has often been considered as leading to
    • consciousness by a visionary one, but he incorporates an imaginative
    • one into it. Ordinary thinking fully controls imaginative experience
    • consciousness. Imagining on the other hand is an actual
    • experience of imagination and that of ordinary consciousness is just
    • consciousness. If this is kept in mind one cannot mistake imaginative
    • who uses ‘imaginative cognition’ is also in a position to
    • the character of visions with that of imagination which is really
    • When Imagination takes place ordinary thinking is recognized as
    • consciousness by imagination is found to be the substantial content of
    • consciousness the imagined picture is alive unconsciously.
    • We imagine also in our ordinary psychic life, but unconsciously. If we
    • did not imagine we should not think. The conscious thoughts of
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  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture IX: The Destination of the Ego-Consciousness in Conjunction with the Christ-problem
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • ‘Imaginative cognition’ of the actual course of human life
  • Title: Philosophy/Cosmology/Religion: Lecture X: On Experiencing the Will-Part of the Soul
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    • Steiner gives a description of philosophy based on Imagination, cosmology
    • Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition. The demand for such a medical
  • Title: Lecture: Rosicrucian Esotericism: Lecture II: Soul in the World around Us
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    • Now imagine that ten or twenty years later, another equally trained
  • Title: Lecture: Rosicrucian Esotericism: Lecture III: The Nature and Being of Man
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    • night he cannot be aware of anything. It is easy to imagine that during
  • Title: Lecture: Rosicrucian Esotericism: Lecture VI: The Configuration and Metamorphoses of Man's Physical Body
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    • even the in-haled air, and imagine that he consists only and entirely
  • Title: Lecture: Rosicrucian Esotericism: Lecture VII: Evolutionary Stages of our Earth before the Lemurian Epoch
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    • of spirit and soul. Just imagine that great masses of human beings were
    • imagine that there was no possibility of the attempted influx of wisdom
  • Title: Lecture: Rosicrucian Esotericism: Lecture VIII: Stages in the Evolution of our Earth. Lemurian, Atlantean, Post-Atlantean Epochs.
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    • influence upon his environment, greater magical powers than were his
    • of man had a visible, magical effect in nature; they attracted the forces
    • of fire above and on the earth. Through his evil lusts and magic will,
    • still not developed, but through his magical, psychic forces. A cannon
    • magical forces, men had a strong effect upon nature. They could, for
    • to imagine that the forces of plants — soul forces, that is to
    • say — can be applied by magical means without at the same time
    • mineral element, the inorganic, and therewith the magical powers vanished
    • into human forms. Every such magical action performed by man with the
    • becomes evil, the worst forces of black magic are generated and evoked.
    • magicians mishandle forces that are, generally speaking, withheld from
    • strong magical powers. With these powers he controlled the seed forces,
    • powerful magicians who worked by means of magical forces and were able
    • of the intelligence of today and no longer made use of the magical forces
    • applied. by the Atlantean magicians at the time when their application
    • down upon and who no longer possessed magical powers. But it was they
    • old initiates or magicians who had not persisted in clinging egotistically
    • magicians, working only with what is inorganic; on the other side, there
    • that time, in Atlantis, the representatives of culture, the old magicians,
  • Title: Signs and Symbols: Lecture 1: The Birth of the Light
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    • cannot imagine that it might deviate and turn from its path even
    • This is what the wise Magi, the great Masters, teach us. It is this
  • Title: Signs and Symbols: Lecture 2: The Christmas Festival as a Symbol of the Sun Victory
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    • ancestor was at a higher stage than that imagined by materialistic
    • imagine an architect using the best forces in himself to build a
    • of the lower beings. Just imagine the sun leaving its orbit for a
    • different time from the one we are accustomed to. Imagine seeds to be
    • will-o'-the-wisps in comparison. Imagine the wisdom with which the
  • Title: Lecture 1: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • his imagination, to his imaginative knowledge, in sharply defined
    • imagination, the first class, as it were, of beings which create and
    • Just as with occult vision we perceive in our imagination clearly
    • the imagination in the changing formations of the cloud.
  • Title: Lecture 2: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • lecture; and in this way, we receive in our imagination the impression
    • in our imagination these meteor-like, flashing, and disappearing
    • penetrate the solid substance of our planet; our imagination is then
  • Title: Lecture 3: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • the contrary idea. Imagine yourself again pouring water from the
    • water, but you must imagine that in the half-filled glass by means of
    • glass. Imagine yourself picturing this idea. Of course everyone who at
    • imagine that you are pouring out water, and that by so doing more
    • imagine the complexity of loving actions we really do nothing else
    • an actual circle, nowhere an actual triangle, we must only imagine
    • have the regularity of a real circle. We must turn to our imagination,
    • our inner life, if we wish to imagine the circle or the triangle or
    • something of that kind. Thus, to imagine something like a spiritual
  • Title: Lecture 4: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • and imagination, as a sort of spiritual light, so is the fluidic life,
  • Title: Lecture 5: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • overwhelming wisdom, and we will imagine that such a wise man speaks
    • speaks to us as the world itself, which we experience. If we imagine
    • such a look or imagine that such a wise man does not speak to us in
    • higher hierarchies. Thus we rightly imagine such a planet as Mars, or
  • Title: Lecture 6: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • concept and here in the center imagine the Sun (S), and the outer
    • Saturn. Thus we have to imagine that where our physical eyes ace the
    • physical science imagines that a planetary system arises from a sort
  • Title: Lecture 7: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • everything is more or less a picture) we must imagine that although
    • work. Take on the other hand a portion of the liver, you must imagine
    • astronomy cannot imagine anything else. Occult vision shows us, that,
  • Title: Lecture 8: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • throwing it into the Rhine; at least I cannot very well imagine a
    • the Rhine. Altogether it is very difficult for me to imagine how a
    • with the growth of plants. Try to imagine the sprouting forth — I
  • Title: Lecture 10: Spiritual Beings in the Heavenly Bodies and in the Kingdoms of Nature
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    • presented symbolically to the imagination, as a normal Spirit of
  • Title: Lecture: The Ten Commandments
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    • to imagine that beyond all that can be spiritually expressed by means
    • of black magic in man but it is then only the astral forces that are
  • Title: The Mission of Savonarola
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    • Medici, as tyrants. Imagine being Lorenzo de Medici and
    • and one can imagine Savonarola being calmed by what had been
  • Title: Lecture: Waking of the Human Soul and the Forming of Destiny: Lecture II
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    • of soul. Just imagine quite truly that we could experience at the
    • experienced imaginations, that these imaginations could affect you so
    • Just imagine what the situation would be if, through some kind of
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture II
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    • imagination cast an eye over the higher forms of culture in recent
    • through the old inherited qualities of soul. Just imagine what it
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture III
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    • imagined. People believe that materialism is a wrong philosophy. That
    • that the perception in Imaginative knowledge, which I put first, is
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture V
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    • Imagination; the human being had to be shown the way from merely
    • poetical, artistic phantasy, to a creative moral Imagination.
    • built up gradually out of Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive
    • experience. If we look at outer Nature, we reach first Imagination,
    • Imaginations as such, then with Imaginations of Nature we have at the
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture VI
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    • characterized yesterday as God-given commandments. When we imagine
    • knowledge one cannot imagine anything more empty. As humanity is
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture VII
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    • us imagine the youth movement progressing and taking hold of younger
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture VIII
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    • who do not merely study the course of time in an unimaginative
    • described. Today we can barely imagine what can be experienced when,
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture IX
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    • imagine that with the methods of modern science man could know as
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture X
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    • really want to point out that with spiritual Imagination, and
    • freely in this inner play of forces can Imagination be reached. Thus
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture XII
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    • to imagine that what they saw as dumb show in Nature — the
    • imagination to extend our own climatic conditions we should have to
    • plants and minerals shining and sparkling in their color, to imagine
    • Imagine
    • another. Let us imagine ourselves in a medieval town.
    • Just imagine what the commentators who pull everything to pieces have
    • said; and imagine someone comes along and says that this should not
  • Title: Lecture: Younger Generation: Lecture XIII
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    • still of a spiritual nature; it wafted like a magic breath through
    • Imagination. That is not possible today for external consciousness.
  • Title: Lecture: Mission of Michael: Lecture I: The Power and Mission of Michael
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    • Now imagine the following: You have here the surface of the ocean, the
    • Now you may well imagine that it is entirely in the interest of the
  • Title: Lecture: Mission of Michael: Lecture II: The Michael revelation.
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    • of spirit, a true concept of Christ, as long as he imagines that the
    • You can easily imagine, hypothetically, that through some sort of
    • fact, by the greatest error imaginable in mankind's evolution, in
    • Speaking in imaginations, we may point back to the fact that the
  • Title: Lecture: Mission of Michael: Lecture III. Michaelic Thinking.
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    • the greatest efforts imaginable are made to turn our human fantasies
    • of evolution and imagine that one thing proceeds from the other in a
    • considered thought itself to be something real. We may imagine that we
  • Title: Lecture: Mission of Michael: Lecture IV: The Culture of the Mysteries and the Michael Impulse.
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    • we sleep our willing. But if imaginative knowledge raises up what
    • moment we have completely acquired imaginative cognition, these
    • day. The second is an imaginative consciousness. And the third
    • II. Imaginations
    • II. Imaginations (consciousness)
  • Title: Lecture: Mission of Michael: Lecture V: The Michael Deed and the Michael Influence as Counter-pole of the Ahrimanic Influence
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    • that time. Now I ask you to imagine that any lawyer of the present age
    • would draw such conclusions. You cannot imagine it. And you can just
    • as little imagine that the mode of thought which Dante employs in
  • Title: Lecture: Signs of the Times: Michaels Battle and Its Reflection On Earth -- I
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    • he is inclined to ascribe it to his own imagination, to his own
    • future.” Just imagine the construction of this thought: a
    • thoughts but will act upon feeling and will. — Just imagine the
  • Title: Lecture: Signs of the Times: Michaels Battle and Its Reflection On Earth -- II
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    • of the forties. You can imagine how differently one looks at the
    • progression, as historians imagine. They believe that the later event
    • imagination, inspiration and intuition with the spiritual world which
    • from gradual death through illness. Imagine the following case: A
  • Title: Psychoanalysis: Lecture I: Anthroposophy and Psychoanalysis I
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    • imagine. The physician brought her to this point in the story,
    • conceive a God, much less imagine that he really exists, or
  • Title: Psychoanalysis: Lecture II: Anthroposophy and Psychoanalysis II
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    • men imagine they have long since got rid of — belief in
    • you may readily imagine that in this modern life, when people
    • Imagine the existence of such a connection between a
  • Title: Psychoanalysis: Lecture III: Reflections in the Mirror of Consciousness, Superconsciousness and Subconsciousness
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    • is not the case; that it is no more sensible for us to imagine
    • forth the details of consciousness than to imagine that a
    • that contains processes of its own. Thus it may be imagined
    • called imaginative cognition), when the clairvoyant
    • consciousness through exercises in imaginative cognition, and
    • trees, imaginary ones. The real objective facts and those which
    • experiment: We imagine that we constructed for ourselves an
    • what you imagine, but you lack understanding for something
    • If you have not simply imagined a feeling, but evolved it by
  • Title: Psychoanalysis: Lecture IV: Hidden Soul Powers
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    • being, through spiritual training, attains to imagination,
    • imagination, inspiration, and intuition of the
    • consciousness would correspond to imaginations gained
    • imagination, or that we have a vision which may be the response
    • the super-sensible world, and let us imagine this world where
    • imagination or a vision, to be between these lines (b–c). In
    • world as an evil or demonic being, either through an imaginary
    • super-sensible imagination or vision of an evil being we develop
    • an imagination or vision of a good being. If in this case we
    • imaginations, or some other sort of subconscious perception of
    • subconscious powers that act like magic in this outer world.
    • question knows or does not know which imaginations correspond
    • visions or had imaginative sight, he would recognize these
    • visions and imaginations as perceptions of his own being; they
    • distinguish a genuine vision or imagination
    • human being, confronting a vision or imagination may ask
    • does not always become vision and imagination. It becomes
    • imagination through correct training, and vision in the case of
    • imaginations, inspirations and premonitions: that these
    • imagination acts upon this elemental world. In the case
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  • Title: Psychoanalysis: Lecture V: Connections Between Organic Processes and the Mental Life of Man
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    • of the present life. You may easily imagine what an
    • may imagine what enormous importance these things will attain
    • most false imaginable. In reality its result is simply to make
  • Title: The Ego: Lecture 1
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    • every man does; for it is impossible to maintain what one imagines as
  • Title: The Ego: Lecture 2
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    • the Chaldean secret schools, with the Magi. They called well to mind
    • Canaan: that means, the soul of Zarathustra; and the three Magi
  • Title: The Ego: Lecture 3
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    • murder Zarathustra, of whom the decadent magicians had said special
  • Title: Bridge between the Ideal and the Real: Lecture I
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    • the demonological stage. Human beings imagined that behind the
    • were active and operative; spirits were imagined everywhere in
  • Title: Bridge between the Ideal and the Real: Lecture II
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    • Imaginative Consciousness, that in the inner experiences during
    • can only do when we attain the Imaginative Consciousness. There
    • remains a kind of reflection of this Imaginative Consciousness
    • become aware, if he were intensely enough to attain Imaginative
    • the ordinary path of human evolution, as you know, Imaginative
  • Title: Lecture: Greek and Germanic Mythology: Lecture II - The Argonaut Saga and the Odyssey
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    • influence of the sirens, who lead men astray by their magic songs. We
    • black magic. This epoch was brought before the pupils of the Greek
    • black magic that their astral bodies resembled those of the lowest
    • lapsed into these wild magic arts. The astral body was so changed
  • Title: Lecture: Greek and Germanic Mythology: Lecture IV - The Trojan War
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    • magician, is the counselor of priest-kings. During the third sub-race
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture III: Occult Signs and Symbols
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    • and magic, nor of a superstitious meaning of some number. Its
    • two. What is this third aspect? Imagine yourself facing a phenomenon
    • life. Imagine the artist, Michelangelo, arranging a group of models.
    • of perfection. There is no superstition or magic in this.
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture IV: Occult Signs and Symbols
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    • had not tossed out. Everything in the way of magical forces that the
    • Imagine a cube-shaped, transparent glass vessel filled with water.
    • Now imagine that certain cooling streams are led through this water
    • thus represents the three dimensions in space. Now imagine the
    • world. You may visualize this by imagining someone moving in one
    • whole world presents itself in such seals, and because the magi and
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 1
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    • clairvoyant imagination, inspiration, and intuition, — all has
    • him. Spiritual beings had first those imaginations, inspirations,
    • imaginations, inspirations, and intuitions, by the help of which he
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 2
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    • liquid, or gaseous, but the light itself one does not see. Imagine
    • still more simply. Let us imagine that we reduce air to a watery
    • light of primeval spiritual science! Imagine to yourselves the Priest
    • Only when these ancient documents are interpenetrated by the magic of
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 3
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    • a god when he is ripe for it and if he imagines for one moment that
    • imagine himself already a god before the time. The one road leads in
    • can imagine the experience you would have had, if you consider the
    • blue gives you a feeling of cold. Imagine that the feeling, which is
    • What happened then? If you want to imagine it you must represent it
    • able to imagine the process more exactly. Let us suppose that you
    • process of exhalation and inhalation. Let us now vividly imagine how
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 4
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    • magicians. They formed those eggs of warmth on Saturn by the force of
    • Let us imagine that the small circle is the ball of the Ancient Sun;
    • find also, evoked as by magic out of the Sun-gas during the Sun's
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 5
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    • imagine that in ancient Saturn were already included the germs of all
    • within ancient Saturn and have evolved out of it. Imagine to
    • imagine that a sort of gas was the starting point of our solar
    • imagine Saturn as a giant globe of warmth, surrounded by circles of
    • starting point for our solar system, and then has imagined that the
    • imagine that the interior of our Sun to-day is also merely a sort of
    • must imagine as reaching out to Jupiter. Thus Saturn was a gigantic
    • imagine a globe with the present Sun for its centre, and for its
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 6
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    • abstract can imagine what is called the Soul of a nation or Spirit of
    • can imagine such a position when the earth
    • Planetoids comes Jupiter, then Saturn. Now imagine it so that whilst
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 7
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    • earth, we have to imagine as containing the bodies of the Hierarchy
    • Let us imagine that someone has progressed so far that he is able to
    • the etheric body, so that you can imagine a Being who does not reach
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 8
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    • large as the whole of our solar system. We must imagine ancient
    • warmth or fire. And now let us imagine that this primeval globe of
    • represent it to yourselves as follows. Imagine that you could place
    • Now, instead of the Lion, imagine another region
    • When you consider Saturn, you would be quite mistaken if you imagined
    • not with the fanciful theories which are imagined. It would lead us
  • Title: Spiritual Hierarchies: Lecture 10
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    • possibilities of development. Now you might perhaps imagine that our
    • Imagine that you have a piece of something which
    • you can imagine to yourselves that, as the material parts contract
    • which the mind of man could ever imagine. What did this mean? To show
    • place.’ Imagine that you have a car to push. You develop your
    • than he otherwise would have been. For imagine: if man had not
  • Title: The East in the Light of the West: Lecture II
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    • consider the result. It is not difficult to imagine, from what has
    • without further preparation, let us suppose that some magician (of
  • Title: The East in the Light of the West: Lecture IV
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    • period. If this were the case, it might well be imagined that a
    • speaking of him in his present condition. Is it to be imagined, then,
  • Title: The East in the Light of the West: Lecture VI
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    • should not of course be imagined that these spirits were composed
    • religion.’ Although these people may imagine themselves to be
    • imagine that they can ever be exhaustively dealt with. But today the
  • Title: The East in the Light of the West: Lecture VIII
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    • imagine that we are contemplating in its fullness the original sacred
  • Title: The East in the Light of the West: Lecture IX
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    • not at the moment imagine that this is very difficult to understand,
  • Title: Wisdom of Man: I. The Position of Anthroposophy in Relation to Theosophy and Anthropology.
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    • spread out beneath it. They cannot rise to the planes of imagination,
    • are called imagination, inspiration, and intuition. Man's ability to
  • Title: Wisdom of Man: II. Supersensible Processes in the Activities of the Human Senses.
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    • itself. You can visualize it approximately by imagining a sponge
    • mere figment of the imagination, an invention of physiology, hence we
    • does not disdain the assistance of that “imagination” it
  • Title: Wisdom of Man: III. Higher Senses, Inner Force Currents and Creative Laws in the Human Organism.
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    • verb vorstellen means imagine, in the loose sense (“I
    • can imagine”), but we have no noun in English that exactly
    • two-petaled lotus flower. That is the imaginative sense, the
    • imaginative, the inspirational and the intuitive, are additional,
    • the imaginative sense pours inward there arises what in
    • because what appears in the imaginative sense works its way into us.
    • By means of this imaginative sense we are able to “sense”
    • red. But through the activity of the imaginative sense we can also
    • thereby something is revealed. Imagine you see neither current, but
    • that case it would be foolish to imagine such a hammer to be the same
  • Title: Wisdom of Man: IV. Supersensible Currents in the Human and Animal Organizations.
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    • passed through these forms would be the same as to imagine that the
    • face we must not imagine it as having been built up from without. On
    • visualization and forming concepts, that is, the imaginative, the
    • scientists' imagination. Animals have no memory; they merely manifest
  • Title: Wisdom of the Soul: I. The Elements of the Soul Life.
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    • Imagine you have a sense experience of color, and observe closely
    • senses, to imagine it pictorially, to clothe it in a garb that is
    • Try, for a moment, to imagine something without the aid
  • Title: Wisdom of the Soul: II. Action and Interaction of the Human Soul Forces.
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    • Imagine you are in the presence of a tree, a bell, and a
  • Title: Wisdom of the Soul: III. At the Portals of the Senses.
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    • Away the dream of sweet imaginings.
    • the soul life by imagining it as filling out a circle.
    • Let us imagine, then, that the content of the soul life
    • is represented by what the circle encloses, and further imagine our
  • Title: Wisdom of the Soul: IV. Consciousness and the Soul Life.
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    • it is here omitted, but again, a little imagination on the part of
    • were you to seek will in the soul, imagining it to be a function by
    • the impression of the new picture that magically and visibly conjured
    • what does it encounter in front, toward the future? Imagine you are
    • on the spiritual world. Now you must imagine the stream of time, and
    • imagine in Goethe's soul a predisposition for the stream out of the
  • Title: Wisdom of the Spirit: I. Franz Brentano and Aristotles Doctrine of the Spirit.
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    • imagines as the future progress of the soul remains vague, but one
    • Now imagine a spirit looking back upon physical
  • Title: Wisdom of the Spirit: II. Truth and Error in the Light of the Spiritual World.
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    • course within corporeality. Imagine for a moment that the
    • One need only imagine, and this is the point, which to
    • imagination, for while the human soul and the world itself must in
    • merely formal but actual. It must be an imagination immanent in the
    • potency; a world imagination, as was explained earlier.”
    • book dealing generally with imagination as a world-creative
  • Title: Wisdom of the Spirit: III. Imagination--Imagination; Inspiration--Self-fulfillment; Intuition--Conscience.
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    • Imagination--Imagination; Inspiration--Self-fulfillment;
    • Imagination — ‘Imagination’;* Inspiration —
    • non-German word Imagination in the sense familiar to students
    • practically never used in German to mean ‘imagination’ in
    • no synonym for ‘imagination’. The best solution available
    • seems to be as follows: whenever ‘imagination’ is used in
    • startled when he runs across something like “imagination leads
    • to ‘imagination’.”
    • phenomena of love and hate. Well, if we imagine the whole extent of
    • true sense of the term we call imagination. Summing up: When
    • have described it points to what we call inner imagination in the
    • imagination is not visualization either. By means of perception, the
    • itself to what we may call the imaginative world. Just as there is a
    • is comprised in imagination, in a conception filled with other than
    • our imaginative life enriches our conceptions.
    • imagination and visualizations. Imagination has a way of announcing
    • really attains to imagination, it senses in its life of
    • contact with the outer world, with corporeality; in imagination it
    • really attain to imagination — it is just as coercive as outer
    • corporeality. Just as little as we can imagine a tree as golden when
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  • Title: Wisdom of the Spirit: IV. Laws of Nature, Evolution of Consciousness and Repeated Earth Lives.
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    • angle with concepts we encountered there, such as imagination,
    • reasoning — to imagination, inspiration and intuition. It is
    • way of imagination, inspiration, and intuition to a genuine cognition
    • in the imaginative world from the world of visualizations —
    • entered this imaginative world. Considered purely in appearance, this
    • imaginative world, which can open up before the soul either through
    • the other hand, this imaginative world stamps itself as pertaining,
    • happen that within this imaginative world, and these are less
    • penetrating this imaginative world may be morally quite casual, for
    • To stand firmly in this imaginative world, to be able to
    • a man can be quite undeveloped and yet see into this imaginative
    • to distinguish certain imaginations exactly as one learns to
    • shape. When a man first faces the imaginative world, it is as though
    • How uniformly important this imaginative world seems! It
    • imaginative world do not seem big or little to us by reason of what
    • and when he passes into the imaginative world this feeling, his
    • sees there. Everything in the imaginative world that appears as
    • imaginative way. That, indeed, is a precarious matter, because a
    • perspective of what the imaginative world offers is wholly
    • imaginative cognition? It means that through the agency of the images
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  • Title: Lecture: The Christmas Festival: A Token of the Victory of the Sun
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    • science imagines. At the time when the human soul was quickened by the
    • imagine an architect devoting all his powers to the building of a
  • Title: Lecture: Signs and Symbols of the Christmas Festival
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    • times and seasons in cosmic life, can imagine that the moment of the
  • Title: Lecture: The Birth of the Sun-Spirit as the Spirit of the Earth
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    • reality, we imagine that the lighted fir-tree shining out to us on
    • That is why we imagine that it must always have existed, even in the
    • Imaginations which can come before the soul during the Thirteen Days
    • for the revelation of that Imagination which may be called the Christ
    • Imagination and which makes us aware that by gaining the victory over
    • Nights are crowned on the 6th of January by the Christ Imagination.
  • Title: Lecture: The Proclamations to the Magi and the Shepherds
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    • The Proclamations to the Magi and the Shepherds
    • another proclamation made to the Three Kings, the Three Magi from the
    • reached the heights of learning, like the Three Magi from the East, in
    • the three Magi from the East enabled them, by contemplating the
    • by the three Magi as a last remnant of an ancient wisdom. It is
    • clearly indicated that these Magi were able to read the secrets of the
    • movements of the stars. The story of the three Kings or Magi points to
    • last surviving remains of this age that men like the three Magi
    • described as the three Magi from the East. The mathematics of the
    • echoes survived in the Magi, was the origin of the one proclamation —
    • and then instinctive-imaginative perception became direct vision. And
    • the revelation made to the three Magi from the East. The great mystery
    • What was it that came to the knowledge of the Magi? What kind of
    • wisdom which in its last echoes had survived in the three Magi from
    • this knowledge had survived in the Magi from the East and through it
    • Mystery too, was announced to the Magi.
    • other than to the three Magi.
    • Magi, they have been kindled during life between birth and death? It
    • which the three Magi from the East were transported — away from the
    • To the Magi: revelation through heavenly lore.
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  • Title: Lecture: On The Three Magi
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    • On The Three Magi
    • the Festival of the Three Kings, of the Magi who came from the East to
    • the Festival of the Three Magi from the East. Until the 15th century,
    • Festival of the Magi by exoteric presentations. One of the Three Kings
    • Who are the Magi? They represent the Initiates of the three preceding
    • — the resurrected Osiris. The Initiates — and so too the Three Magi
    • Thus the Three Kings or Magi are representatives of the Lemurians, the
    • descending Christ, the descending Logos. All this the Magi foresaw.
    • before the Magi is the soul of Christ Himself. The Second Logos
    • Himself shines before the Magi and over the cave in Bethlehem.
    • understand more and more what a Magi is, and what the great Magi, the
  • Title: Lecture: The Birth of Christ Within Us
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    • And now let us imagine that the Mystery of Golgotha had not taken
  • Title: Christ Impulse: Lecture 1: The Sphere of the Bodhisattvas
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    • thought. It is very difficult for people of our day to imagine how
  • Title: Christ Impulse: Lecture 3: The Entrance of the Christ-Being into the Evolution of Humanity
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    • represents in a wonderful imaginative picture, what I have just
    • epoch. As you can well imagine, man would have been quite different if
    • materialists in the realms of Spiritual Science, and can only imagine
  • Title: Christ Impulse: Lecture 4: The Sermon on the Mount
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    • imagining the existence of spirit, and who, consequently, keep flying
  • Title: Christ Impulse: Lecture 5: Correspondences Between the Microcosm and the Macrocosm
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    • difficult to imagine as it may seem to the man of to-day, who is not
    • perceive the facts of life, or who learns them through imaginative
    • could not have imagined. but this possibility is a necessity, for only
  • Title: Life Between ... II: Investigations Into Life Between Death and Rebirth 2
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    • Imagine the whole of the solar system out of action and only the
    • Imagine that you did not have your consciousness inside you,
  • Title: Life Between ... III: Mans Journey Through the Planetary Spheres
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    • obvious that if we do not possess magical powers it will not be
    • description of what he has seen. You can well imagine that if he goes
    • confined to one part of the earth. To imagine it as confined would be
    • One could imagine someone among you going out after the lecture and
    • the greatest calamity. For I could imagine that such a person does
  • Title: Life Between ... IV: Recent Results of Occult Investigation Into Life
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    • express our physical world. Imagine the space between the earth and
    • spiritual world must be imagined quite differently from what is
    • cosmos now appears as if reflected by man. You can imagine the
  • Title: Life Between ... V: Life Between Death and Rebirth 1
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    • imagine that we are fully conversant with them when they have been
    • the form of Imaginations. If we take the words “Visions”
    • or “Imaginations” in the sense in which I explained them
    • by its Imaginations. At first the cloud is dark. When some time has
    • elapsed after death, Imaginative vision gradually perceives that this
    • sun. When Inspiration is added to Imaginative cognition we realize
    • into the spiritual world. What we have characterized for Imaginative
    • perceived through imaginative cognition as the soul draws out of the
    • the prison of his cloud of Imaginations and approach him. Morality
  • Title: Life Between ... VI: Life Between Death and Rebirth 2
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    • It expresses itself as it did on earth. One can readily imagine that
    • imagine it to be painful. In many respects it is so but the dead one
    • What happens as a result of this process? Imagine that after death we
  • Title: Life Between ... VII: The Working of Karma in Life After Death
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    • knowing about the etheric body and imagining it in its full activity,
  • Title: Life Between ... VIII: Between Death and a New Birth
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    • many such possibilities he escapes every single day? Imagine all the
  • Title: Life Between ... IX: Life After Death
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    • burden of physical existence. I was then quite unable to imagine life
    • We should not imagine that we have nothing to do between death and a
    • spite of the first? One all too readily imagines that the findings of
    • Man imagines that he has reached a considerable degree of wisdom when
    • occult writings are often more profound than we imagine. When the
  • Title: Life Between ... X: Anthroposophy as the Quickener of Feeling and of Life
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    • of this world? He makes use of his senses, brings his imagination to
    • Imagine for a moment that you are in the habit of leaving home every
    • by the falling roof. Imagine this quite vividly! It does happen that
    • now the living can imagine himself in the presence of the dead, and
  • Title: Life Between ... XI: The Mission of Earthly Life as a Transitional Stage for the Beyond
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    • however, is more complicated than is usually imagined. It is easier
  • Title: Life Between ... XII: Life Between Death and Rebirth 1
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    • attained. One might well imagine that when such a person again enters
    • One often imagines insight into the spiritual world as a blessed
  • Title: Life Between ... XIII: Life Between Death and Rebirth 2
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    • ordinarily imagined can also cause a soul to remain bound to the
    • Do not imagine that the end of Pandora is in some way
    • other. While we are living on earth, often imagining that we are
  • Title: Life Between ... XIV: Further Facts About Life Between Death and Rebirth
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    • You can imagine, my dear friends, that life between death and a new
    • time he learns to live as a soul-spirit being. Let us vividly imagine
    • the living and the dead. We can imagine that if we succeed in
  • Title: Life Between ... XV: Intercourse With the Dead
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    • evolution. It is further emphasized that black magicians who have
    • specially imaginative scientists have constructed a body of
  • Title: Life Between ... XVI: Life After Death
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    • anything that can be experienced here. We must imagine that
    • thoughts, by imagining the dead here with us in thought. In this way
    • It is also impossible, as one might easily imagine, to learn any more
  • Title: Lecture I: Human and Cosmic Thought
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    • of when you imagine it. You see the rose, its external red colour,
    • certain demands on your imagination. You must think to yourself that
    • actual ones. For imagine that you are in need of a hundred thalers,
  • Title: Lecture II: Human and Cosmic Thought
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    • Hence I imagine that every night someone has the duty of repolishing
    • does certainly seem rather grotesque if one imagines that the
    • Realists did, that the Three Persons formed not merely an imaginary
    • Let us imagine the way in which one forms general concepts; the way
  • Title: Lecture III: Human and Cosmic Thought
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    • with imagination, so the occultist, the Intuitionist, as we mean him
  • Title: Lecture IV: Human and Cosmic Thought
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    • Imagine that you are standing there and want to see your face in a
    • appears in Idealism.” Imagine this first as the preparatory
  • Title: Lecture I: Human and Cosmic Thought
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    • of when you imagine it. You see the rose, its external red colour,
    • certain demands on your imagination. You must think to yourself that
    • actual ones. For imagine that you are in need of a hundred thalers,
  • Title: Lecture II: Human and Cosmic Thought
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    • Hence I imagine that every night someone has the duty of repolishing
    • does certainly seem rather grotesque if one imagines that the
    • Realists did, that the Three Persons formed not merely an imaginary
    • Let us imagine the way in which one forms general concepts; the way
  • Title: Lecture III: Human and Cosmic Thought
    Matching lines:
    • with imagination, so the occultist, the Intuitionist, as we mean him
  • Title: Lecture IV: Human and Cosmic Thought
    Matching lines:
    • Imagine that you are standing there and want to see your face in a
    • appears in Idealism.” Imagine this first as the preparatory
  • Title: Lecture: The Origin of Suffering
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    • imagination that makes many scientists have such a false idea of
  • Title: Lecture: What Do We Understand by Illness and Death
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    • imaginative force, gradually disappears.
    • here how the etheric body is the bearer of creative imagination, of
    • following is given as an illustration. Imagine you have a piece of
  • Title: Manifestations/Karma: Lecture: The Nature and Significance of Karma in the Personal and Individual, and in Humanity, the Earth and the Universe
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    • perceptible. Imagine what would have happened to our astronomy if the
  • Title: Manifestations/Karma: Lecture: Karma and the Animal Kingdom
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    • human thought invents and imagines. Abstractly one can think anything,
  • Title: Manifestations/Karma: Lecture: The Relationships Between Karma and Accidents
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    • pain, passions, imaginations, and so forth, sink down into the
  • Title: Manifestations/Karma: Lecture: Free Will and Karma in the Future of Human Evolution
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    • impurifying, or damaging to the substance woven out of light. If love
  • Title: Manifestations/Karma: Lecture: Individual and Human Karma. Karma of the Higher Beings.
    Matching lines:
    • imagine that in the events which happen to a whole nation or to a
    • world as forces guided from the spiritual world. Those will be magical
  • Title: Lecture: Secrets/Threshold: Lecture I
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    • I can imagine that many people — from
    • and the Other Philia; we have the still imaginative pictures that
    • represented only by such an imaginative perception as the image of
    • Just imagine some modern philosopher or one from the
    • Well, one cannot easily imagine such a
  • Title: Lecture: Secrets/Threshold: Lecture II
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    • through his imagination and his soul life of feeling, no longer
    • heated to 900 degrees that is actually perceptible and the imagined
    • imagined dollars are just as valuable as a hundred real ones —
    • that, too, will be contradicted by life. Certainly a hundred imagined
    • be correct to try to pay a hundred dollar debt with imagined
    • the following picture: Imagine to yourselves a being made of rubber
  • Title: Lecture: Secrets/Threshold: Lecture III
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    • to free itself from physical constraints, he may imagine himself to
    • and if her etheric body has been loosened, she may imagine that she
    • living in imagination, in mental images, the ability to make his
    • the faculty of transformation: thinking or imagination; for the
    • We would be mistaken if we imagined that the alternation
    • living beings. Only imagine how it is when you cannot form and
    • our thinking must become from what it is here. Imagine sticking your
  • Title: Lecture: Secrets/Threshold: Lecture IV
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    • the physical sense world. You can easily imagine that stage hands
    • One should not imagine that learning to
    • imagine without approaching the spiritual world?”
    • imagine, for it is usually just the opposite of what we might expect.
    • acquired in the present earth life to create in the imagination what
    • soul it would have imagined something quite different.” Even
    • to the so-called proof of God' s existence, that a hundred imaginary
    • be demolished by anyone who tries to pay his debts with imaginary and
    • distinguish the heat of an iron on our skin from an imaginary iron.
  • Title: Lecture: Secrets/Threshold: Lecture VI
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    • described in the following way: Imagine a moment in your ordinary
  • Title: Lecture: Secrets/Threshold: Lecture VII
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    • “imaginative soul experiences,” with all the imbalance
    • other action is the subjective imaginative experience of Johannes
    • soul as imaginative insight. This is very clear from the stage
    • imaginations of Johannes Thomasius.
    • not remain in the realm of imagination but extends into the objective
  • Title: Lecture: Secrets/Threshold: Lecture VIII
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    • that really outdoes everything imaginable in grotesque erudition —
    • imagine a great swarm of gnats. From a distance it looks like a
  • Title: Lecture 1: On the Meaning of Life
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    • imagination was left to him and this was then developed in the soul
  • Title: Lecture 2: On the Meaning of Life
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    • the point when what we call imaginative pictures arose out of the
    • depths of his soul. We know what imaginative pictures are. They are
    • what may be called imaginative visions which then surround us on all
    • immeasurable as long as we do not ascend from Imagination, which
    • progress in Anthroposophy. All magic is based on this. While it is
    • us unites with something outside, it is given to the magic
    • means the case that we have to imagine this as a work within narrow
    • the cosmic mysteries and that which his own arbitrary imagination has
  • Title: Inner Impulses: Lecture I
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    • western black magic mysteries centered in Mexico. New light is also
    • civilization utterly devoid of fantasy and imagination in every sphere
    • Greek spiritual life that comes from the old imaginations of the
    • experience. Of course, imagination was no longer present to the same
    • the inspiring force of the old imaginative ideation. An utter
    • hear behind his language the echoing of the life of imagination.
    • way, the salvation of the imaginative element. It represents a
    • to give it life. In contrast, we see the uprising, imaginative life
    • fifth, this imaginative life was rekindled. It stood as a kind of
    • men through his living imagination, or from his inheritance of living
    • imaginations, Rome formed a definite concept that first came to life
    • different kind of thinking, an imaginative thinking that was not yet
  • Title: Inner Impulses: Lecture II
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    • Imaginations as the Task of Our Time. Genghis Khan and the
    • western black magic mysteries centered in Mexico. New light is also
    • The Influence of Luciferic and Ahrimanic Beings on Historical Development. The clear Perception of the Sensory World and Free Imaginations as the Task of Our Time. Genghis Khan and the Discovery of America
    • say these things out of imaginative cognition, and this will also be
    • seen, directed to carrying over the ancient imaginations of the
    • their imaginations, refined and distilled to fantasy, should fill
    • have consisted entirely of those subtle imaginations that had become
    • imaginations refined to fantasy, if these enticing imaginations had
    • as you know, a visionary, imaginative element continuously played into
    • seen, after fantasy and imagination had taken possession of humanity,
    • illumination of a vision standing behind it. We need not imagine that
    • The other task is to unfold free imaginations side by side with the
    • this task. Free imaginations as sought through spiritual science means
    • imaginations not as they were in the third post-Atlantean age, but
    • unfettered and undistilled into fantasy. It means imaginations in
    • but also for free imaginations.* What he has given us in his
    • imaginative life. It is no mere world of fantasy, yet we have seen how
    • imaginations in the wonderful drama, Faust.
    • visions on the one hand and an objective imagination which begins with
    • come from free imaginations will have to be included in this primal
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  • Title: Inner Impulses: Lecture III
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    • western black magic mysteries centered in Mexico. New light is also
    • unfolding in our thought and deed of free imaginations and an attitude
    • fuller and wider measure by means of the most frightful magical arts.
    • through certain magic forces. He could inflict them upon those whom he
    • knowledge. This was one of the greatest black magicians, if not the
    • Then a conflict began between this super-magician and the being to
    • when Vitzliputzli was able to have the great magician crucified, and
    • the great magician of Taotl was killed. In this way Vitzliputzli was
    • magician, Vitzliputzli was able to imbue men again with the desire for
    • the world only inwardly in free imaginations. All this is in its
  • Title: Inner Impulses: Lecture IV
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    • western black magic mysteries centered in Mexico. New light is also
    • or less in the same way. When one looks back, one imagines that one
    • already receded, those who imagine it to have withdrawn often do not
    • person imagines, that is, the search for the spirit along
    • Just imagine how such a principle might be realized today when
    • Why is this or that said? Do you imagine that those who say, “The
  • Title: Inner Impulses: Lecture V
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    • western black magic mysteries centered in Mexico. New light is also
    • imagination and thoughts, and through the will, which, in turn, was
    • inspired, by fantasy and imagination. We must realize that this
    • fantasy and imagination in the Greeks, which also influenced their
    • imagination where his soul would be alienated from earthly existence,
    • development of the gift of free imagination that arises in complete
    • free imagination.
    • Goethe spoke of the primal phenomenon and also of free imagination.
    • initiate acquired actual powers of black magic, the application of
    • succeeded in causing this mightiest black magician to be crucified.
    • magician of all was crucified by the action of Vitzliputzli who had
    • initiated black magician by the deed of Vitzliputzli. Nevertheless, so
    • imagination of the Europeans concerning the Western Hemisphere. Marco
    • Polo's Travels spoke of a magic land in the West, which stirred
    • discover the magic land; indeed, this is mentioned in ordinary
    • be worked out in great imaginations, of which examples are to be found
  • Title: Inner Impulses: Lecture VI
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    • western black magic mysteries centered in Mexico. New light is also
    • equally in his conception of nature and in his imaginative world,
    • innocent, they were accused of every imaginable vice. One day in
    • imaginations of Goethe. Goethe knew the secret of the Templars. Not
  • Title: Inner Impulses: Lecture VII
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    • western black magic mysteries centered in Mexico. New light is also
    • You see, I am now telling you these things, but imagine for a moment
    • imagine these to be reality. Men had to be educated like this in these
    • can even be easily proved historically that they knew it. Imagine that
    • Do not imagine that wisdom was not connected with the practical in
  • Title: Cosmic New Year: Lecture I: The Three Streams in the Life of Civilization. The Mysteries of Light, of Man, and of the Earth.
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    • Naturally, then, one cannot imagine what would come over human beings
    • people lacking in imagination. I might call it “the stream of
    • the unimaginative mind of Rome. We shall not understand modern life,
  • Title: Cosmic New Year: Lecture III: The Mystery of the Human Will
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    • Imagination and inspiration to make those forces active which enable
    • Atlantean epoch man gave himself up to a form of black magic. The
    • say, an Imagination; for the hallucination is so spiritualized that it
    • is an actual Imagination. But more than an Imagination is not to be
    • What is the path from Imagination to Reality? The path will be opened
    • that the Imagination of the Gospels shall be raised to Reality through
    • not follow this path of Imagination in the Gospels on to the Reality
  • Title: Cosmic New Year: Lecture V: The Dogma of Revelation and the Dogma of Experience. The Spiritual Mark of the Present Time. A New Year Contemplation.
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    • this one, and boldly facing the highest imaginable tasks, is now
    • in human needs. It is easy to imagine that when man with his
  • Title: Lecture: Knowledge and Initiation
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    • imaginative thinking; imaginative not in the sense of arbitrary
    • this life of imaginative thought, which is saturated with a kind of
    • of imaginative thought, however, is better described as ‘an organism
    • in time’. Suddenly there stands before us in a single imaginative
    • imaginative knowledge is the first and necessary stage we must pass
    • within it by imagination and concentration. This power is attained in
    • that once we have reached this stage after passing through Imagination
    • imagination, inspiration and intuition. No. It is necessary for every
    • attained imaginational, inspirational and intuitional knowledge of the
    • experiences. Imagination, inspiration and intuition are the very
    • developing this higher knowledge, imagination, inspiration and
  • Title: Lecture: Cognition of the Christ Through Anthroposophy
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    • leading to imagination, inspiration and intuition. I showed how by
    • imagination and concentration, by means of certain exercises, the
    • may be called imaginative in the real sense of the word, and in such a
    • sense impressions — but imaginative, pictorial, vivid and full of
    • the senses. The man who has attained to imaginative thinking, has
    • to this imaginative thought, and those who abandon themselves to
    • the other hand, he who has imaginative thought is fully aware that
    • subjective nature of that imaginative picture-world. He knows too,
    • that when through ‘imaginative thought’ he comes to perceive what was
    • imaginative pictures he has before him in imaginative thought, but can
    • real imaginations to pour into him from the external world
    • the objective imaginations as against the subjective picture-world
    • the universe. Thus, through this imaginative, inspirational knowledge,
    • development of the soul to imaginative, inspirational and intuitional
    • imaginative, plastic thought, and inspirational and intuitional
    • After man has attained to Imagination and Inspiration, he has to say
    • the man of today when he has risen to Imagination and Inspiration,
    • imagine evolution continuing in a straight downward line, and that is
    • through the way of initiation to ‘imagination’ and ‘inspiration’, that
    • development) attained to a kind of imagination, inspiration and
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas-Soul: Lecture I
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    • — more or less suitably, according to the inner imaginative
    • the plan of higher worlds, it beholds in its imaginations the beings
    • easily imagine them as having stationed some clairvoyant being on
    • when you must imagine Michael to have cast the Dragon out of heaven
    • imagining the matter in this way; and because more and more the
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas-Soul: Lecture II
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    • imagined that one should add to these festivals simply by establishing
    • majestic plant; and if he is at all imaginative he may even achieve an
    • the blossom, we must vividly imagine — though not personified
    • If you will imagine this thought developed in the human
    • in the manner described. But do not imagine that you are experiencing
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas-Soul: Lecture III
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    • as they appeal to the imagination, but rather in the emotional
    • connection is Dr. Ludwig Staudenmaier's book on Experimental Magic. A
    • “spirits!” Imagine: the materialist, who of course
    • to imagine that the spiritual world can be comprehended by means of
    • must be presented pictorially. We must have pictures, imaginations,
    • imaginations always lead a life of their own: we feel quite clearly
    • that an imagination presents itself to us. It is different from
    • imaginations are not abstractly held fast like mere thoughts: we
    • already taken on so abstract a character these imaginations flit past
    • again at once. The same is true of imaginations by means of which we
    • has this peculiarity: while imaginations stamp themselves less readily
    • so more intensively than is usually imagined; and what the ancient
    • on, we thereby employ the means comprised in imagination,
    • inspiration, and intuition. In that way, even when only imagination
    • especially after rising from imagination to inspiration are we
    • animalistic element. What nowadays we think, we imagine our abstract
    • is disclosed through imagination, but far more through inspiration and
    • recollections but mighty imaginations transfused by intuitions: here
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas-Soul: Lecture IV
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    • — cannot come into being of itself. So if we imagine the flower
    • imagination, inspiration, and intuition find the spirit in the
    • Through imagination we learn first how the spirit principle of the
    • imaginative cognition, in contemplating the earth, finds not an
    • Now let us see what this imagination perceives during the course of a
    • the imaginative aspect of the earth in winter: it takes into its body,
    • different from abstract concepts; and furthermore, do not imagine that
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture I
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    • schemes about all imaginable things in the world, and so on. Another
    • Now one might imagine that this process was simply
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture II
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    • followed with Imaginative vision beyond the gate of death, and that
    • If with Imaginative vision we follow what thus goes
    • seen by Imaginative vision after a man has gone through the gate of
    • exercises one can so develop his imagination that he can himself
    • imagination, allowing his ordinary thoughts to go forth and accompany
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture III
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    • Inner Life of Nature, through Imagination and Will
    • If now with Imaginative vision we can behold man in sleep as a
    • observed from outside can be seen by Imaginative clairvoyance.
    • looks at a man with imaginative clairvoyance and observes the ego
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture IV: The Ephesian Mysteries of Artemis
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    • lectures. Let us suppose that someone possessing Imaginative
    • however, with Imaginative consciousness he approaches these rocks,
    • Imaginative cognition, while the outer surfaces appear as the walls
    • into very many separate parts. One would like to imagine, and indeed
    • feeling that just as we live imaginatively into the crystal covering
    • becomes a truth, a deep truth to the imaginative observer, that what
    • of Imaginative cognition when it is applied to the hardest part of
    • knowledge by Imaginative vision is not yet quite at home when he
    • physicists are the most limited one can imagine. For example, they
    • imagine that when they melt lead it becomes softer and softer, and of
    • space as the physicists imagine to be the case with light rays. They
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture V
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    • we transfer ourselves through Imaginative vision into these rocks of
    • not merely imaginary masses of clouds, they were living things having
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture VI
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    • and he who, equipped with Imaginative insight into world history
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture VII: The Mysteries of Hibernia
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    • This too, made, as you may imagine, a powerful
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture VIII
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    • Cosmos is actually past. The snow and ice-masses of my magic winter
    • The pupil now knew that that which was there as magic
    • annihilation in gazing upon the magic winter landscape. And he knows
    • dreamlike magical Summer experience he had gained the insight can
    • Imaginations, Imaginations of plants. If I had only the pictures of
    • Imaginations, there grows out of my own inner being that which I then
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture IX
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    • through, it was possible that as by magic, landscapes as they are
    • Imaginations which were connected with that which he otherwise saw
    • Imaginations that he was about to penetrate further by means of these
    • Imaginations to something quite different.
    • upper hand over the wonderful imaginative pictures which came over
    • magnificent imaginative pictures which announced the Redeemer as a
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture X: The Chthonic and the Eleusinian Mysteries
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    • You must therefore imagine the earth, and in the
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture XI: The Secret of Plants, of Metals, and of Men
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    • journeys of conquest. Try and imagine what relation exists between
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture XII: The Mysteries of the Samothracian Kabiri
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    • say that there appears before our Imaginative consciousness, with all
    • Imaginative consciousness,” because of course if we extend
    • Imagination; these we will place before our souls today and study
    • at last I am entering something which reveals to me the magical deeds
    • magical powers of this celebrant Father reveal to the pupil? Through
    • priestly magician and sage, this Hierophant, was able to write
    • While the priestly magician spoke into this sacrificial
    • the Samothracian priestly magician felt with the air he breathed out,
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture XIII: Transition from the Spirit of the Ancient Mysteries to the Spirit of the Mysteries of the Middle Ages
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    • means if he does not reveal them to you. Just imagine for a moment
  • Title: Mystery Centres: Lecture XIV: Human Soul-Strivings During the Middle Ages the Rosicrucian Mysteries
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    • be seen through a diminished light. Thus you must imagine that the
  • Title: Fundamentals of Anthroposophical Medicine: Lecture I
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    • — and reach what I have described as Imaginative
    • knowing. In Imaginative cognition, I receive pictures of
    • dream-pictures. In Imaginative cognition I do not have reality
    • Imagination, Inspiration, or Intuition is used to gain
    • reach the stage of Imaginative knowledge, where pictures arise,
    • this Imaginative cognition, which naturally functions entirely
    • symbolic representation of what Imaginative knowledge is, in
    • mathematical problem, I would say the following: imagine that a
    • In the brain, nature itself has given us as a real Imagination,
    • an Imagination perceptible to the senses, something that is
    • attained in Imaginative knowledge at a higher level.
    • Imagination we behold a world, a super-sensible world, and it is
    • world; in the human brain we behold a world of Imagination in
    • structure an Imaginative replica of the life of soul. It is
    • In Imaginative
    • Imaginations teem with spiritual reality, we suddenly find
    • whole meaning of the breathing process, just as Imaginative
    • structure of the brain. The brain is an: Imagination made
    • Imagination,
    • super-sensible world. Indeed, we need only rise to Imagination,
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  • Title: Fundamentals of Anthroposophical Medicine: Lecture III
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    • sulfurous aspect. It is totally incorrect to imagine that the
  • Title: Fundamentals of Anthroposophical Medicine: Lecture IV
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    • nerve-sense system as is generally imagined.
    • magical names given to illnesses merely serve the purpose of
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture I: Physiology and Therapeutics
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    • Now you can imagine weaker versions of these most extreme cases that I
    • have sketched here. Imagine that the first extreme did not reach the point
    • characterized as Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition; I will show it
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture IV: Physiology and Therapeutics
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    • processes of the metabolic-limb system. You can imagine (and this can
    • Let me refer to a specific case in this connection. Imagine, please —
  • Title: Anthroposophical Approach to Medicine: Lecture I
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    • by no means so childish as many people imagine nowadays, they did
    • I have described as Imaginative Cognition. A still higher level is
    • Intuitive Knowledge. In Imaginative Knowledge one comes to pictures
    • dream-pictures. The pictures arising in Imaginative Cognition are
    • biology. When Imagination, or Inspiration, or Intuition, is used for
    • all this clears up only when we reach the stage of Imaginative
    • then, is this Imaginative Knowledge, which functions, of course,
    • a concrete picture of what Imaginative Knowledge is, in the way that
    • should say the following: Imagine that a man, living in the world,
    • real Imagination, an Imagination that is real in the concrete sense,
    • something that is attained in Imaginative Knowledge at a higher
    • human brain is not an isolated formation. Through Imagination we
    • Imagination lies there, in concrete fact, before us. I do not believe
    • in its structure an Imaginative replica of the life of soul. It is
    • Imaginative Knowledge pictures arise before us, but if we rise to
    • the super-sensible world in such a way that the Imaginations teem with
    • breathing process, just as Imaginative Knowledge leads to an
    • an Imagination made concrete; everything connected with the
    • Imaginative
    • only rise to Imagination, which lies quite near the boundaries of
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  • Title: Anthroposophical Approach to Medicine: Lecture III
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    • phosphoric or sulphurous principle. It is quite incorrect to imagine
  • Title: Anthroposophical Approach to Medicine: Lecture IV
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    • case of the system of nerves and senses as is generally imagined.
    • kind? The best thing, to begin with, is to realise that the magical
  • Title: Social Future: Lecture I: The Social Question as a Cultural Question, a Question of Equity, and a Question of Economics
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    • social misery would disappear. But all such imaginary Utopias,’
    • expression to the paradox: Woodrow Wilson, who certainly imagined a
  • Title: Social Future: Lecture II: The Organization of a Practical Economic Life on the Associative Basis
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    • leads to the imagination of such a project? This question can easily
    • nature and, by producing this imaginary effect, at the same time
  • Title: Social Future: Lecture III: The Task and Limitations of of Democracy, Public and Criminal Law
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    • the human power of imagination; for since a man must act consciously,
    • imagination, his thought-will. Of course, the power of imagination
    • feeling alone is powerless, if the fundamental imagination is absent.
    • brings us in the last instance to the life of imagination. It became
    • realize in social life his power of imagination. The other element
  • Title: Social Future: Lecture IV: Cultural Questions, Spiritual Science, Art, Science, Religion
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    • research, lest something like imaginative or artistic intuitions
  • Title: Social Future: Lecture V: The Cooperation of the Spiritual, Political and Economic Departments of Life
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    • man imagines himself to be free. He is not aware of his dependence,
    • spiritual, and in the equity life. It would be impossible to imagine
  • Title: Social Future: Lecture VI: National and International Life in the Threefold Social Organism
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    • the nature of creative fantasy, of imaginative creation arises out of
    • of man's imagination. All that rises out of the unknown depths of his
    • wants. The life of imagination, of fantasy, which is developed in
    • with, glows with, the imagination of the people in which it finds
    • expression. But this life of imagination itself is the higher
    • religion, it is the imagination arising out of egoism which holds the
    • same soil as imagination; but it is rooted in profounder depths of
    • imaginative forms, but reaches to the objective knowledge of the
    • objective aim. It takes the same way as imagination, and rises
    • above all that which, as imagination, inspires the nations. It is
    • individualism in the imagination of one people, the single peoples
    • can well imagine that even after I have attempted to describe the
    • relation to its threefoldness, I can well imagine that there may
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture II
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    • imagine the economic process, considered even as a world-economy, as a
    • times as much: nor need we imagine that the main cause of the rise in
    • far-fetched cases, you can imagine some-thing that would otherwise not
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture IV
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    • properly have a taste for doing so. Only he must not imagine that it
    • the outer world of reality, the completest imaginable process of
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture V
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    • Now we must imagine it moving up to a
    • that case it is the Labour that increases the value. But to imagine
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture VI
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    • economic facts alter from the past into the future. He who imagines
    • process cannot go on at all. Imagine for a moment what we should make
    • productive. Imagine the free spiritual life in the social organism
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture VIII
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    • demand it is thus imagined that prices on the market will,
    • Our concepts are quite unreal if we imagine that price arises from the
    • longer, people would imagine that we were anxious to agitate; and I
    • whether I imagine that I am paying the labourer for his Labour. You
    • of wages, we imagine that we are paying for Labour, and then we go on
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture IX
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    • Imagine, for instance, that a cobbler falls ill and has an unskilful
    • They are drawn in far more than they imagine. Precisely during the
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture X
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    • imagine, for instance, that a purchase is taking place: A buys from B.
    • abstract concepts to ideation of an imaginative kind. Yet we can never
    • imaginative pictures. And these pictures must contain a dynamic
    • it is only by working imaginative perceptions into it that we can
    • grasp anything of it. For instance, we may have the imaginative
    • imaginative perception of peas being used as money. That is another
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture XII
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    • into account and yet it plays the greatest imaginable part in the
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture XIII
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    • begin with, in the things produced — we will imagine even the
    • We can scarcely imagine the schoolmaster or the parson blossoming out
    • ordinary way, imagine such a thing existing in our little village
    • question, if we begin by imagining quite vividly what the others must
  • Title: World Economy: Lecture XIV
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    • conditions. You can imagine the entire area distributed among the
    • can imagine the entire area divided up among the population, and it is
  • Title: Lecture I: Man's Life on Earth
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    • such as is scarcely possible for us to imagine today with our
  • Title: Lecture II: Man's Life on Earth
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    • Imaginations are mainly used
    • not so much from the standpoint of Imagination, but rather from the
    • becomes ever more enhanced. Of course, you will not imagine that the
    • but if you imagine vividly what is astir while a table is being made
    • must imagine it to be, even from our great-great-great-grandmother,
    • What do you imagine the interior of the Sun to be? If you could enter
    • imagining an extended space in which some pressure is prevailing, you
  • Title: Lecture III: Man's Life on Earth
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    • imagining that these events take place for the initiate alone; they
    • Imagine
    • into the flower of the tulip, and express, in the imagination of the
  • Title: Lecture IV: Man's Life on Earth
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    • must concern himself from birth to death. Please do not imagine
    • with physical sight. You will not of course imagine that the human
    • us imagine a particular case. In consequence of the way in which he
  • Title: Lecture VI: Man's Life on Earth
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    • with the great Universe. Do you imagine that the Universe will
    • Taurus sphere. You may imagine therefore, what is the nature of the
    • magic”. If while on Earth you are receptive to the illumination
    • spiritual world. And this is true “ideal magic”. It is
    • the true “white magic” as it was called in olden times,
  • Title: Lecture: Planetary Spheres: Lecture I
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    • such as is scarcely possible for us to imagine today with our
  • Title: Lecture: Planetary Spheres: Lecture II
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    • Imaginations are mainly used
    • not so much from the standpoint of Imagination, but rather from the
    • becomes ever more enhanced. Of course, you will not imagine that the
    • but if you imagine vividly what is astir while a table is being made
    • must imagine it to be, even from our great-great-great-grandmother,
    • What do you imagine the interior of the Sun to be? If you could enter
    • imagining an extended space in which some pressure is prevailing, you
  • Title: Lecture: Planetary Spheres: Lecture III
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    • imagining that these events take place for the initiate alone; they
    • Imagine
    • into the flower of the tulip, and express, in the imagination of the
  • Title: Lecture: Planetary Spheres: Lecture IV
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    • must concern himself from birth to death. Please do not imagine
    • with physical sight. You will not of course imagine that the human
    • us imagine a particular case. In consequence of the way in which he
  • Title: Lecture: Planetary Spheres: Lecture VI
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    • with the great Universe. Do you imagine that the Universe will
    • Taurus sphere. You may imagine therefore, what is the nature of the
    • magic”. If while on Earth you are receptive to the illumination
    • spiritual world. And this is true “ideal magic”. It is
    • the true “white magic” as it was called in olden times,
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture I: The Event of the Appearance of Christ in the Etheric World
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    • can imagine that the human soul must have had quite different
    • therefore imagine that it makes a difference whether you dwell on the
    • If you were to imagine yourselves for a moment in that
    • will be unable to imagine that the souls of human beings must advance
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture II: Spiritual Science as Preparation for a New Etheric Vision
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    • what a modern child learns today; try to imagine all this, and then
    • that they cannot imagine anything but that when Christ appears again,
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture IV: Mysteries of the Universe: Comets and the Moon
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    • You can well imagine that when something new, like a
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture VII: The Return of Christ
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    • Let us imagine now the state of human souls at the onset
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture IX: The Etherization of the Blood
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    • we can easily imagine that if the action had been preceded by thought
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture X: Individual Spirit Beings and the Undivided Foundation of the World: Part 1
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    • small groups could cause everything imaginable with these secrets.
    • We imagine here the realm of such a harmless humanity
    • wishes to achieve is clothed in the form of veneration. Imagine that
    • Imagine if one entered through the door and on these chairs sat
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture XI: Individual Spirit Beings and the Undivided Foundation of the World: Part 2
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    • accountable by an undivided principle. Imagine that this,
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture XII: Individual Spirit Beings and the Undivided Foundation of the World: Part 3
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    • can imagine how these things could be exploited for power by groups
  • Title: Reappearance/Christ: Lecture XIII: The Three Realms of the Dead: Life Between Death and a New Birth
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    • An imaginative perception can already picture the
    • One must not imagine that such dead souls are then
    • old-fashioned prejudices imaginable, because whoever understands the
    • Imagine what all those organizations (created, I grant you, out of
  • Title: The Earth As Being with Life, Soul, and Spirit: Lecture 2
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    • about it. In an essay written in 1858 he said that one could imagine
    • bee-hive! That is a beautiful picture. And then one could imagine:
    • imagine a sphere floating in cosmic space, gleaming on one side in
    • Imaginations) as ‘heavenly Jerusalem’. These are not
    • Imagination for what I described in conclusion the day before
    • yesterday. It is really important that through such Imaginations
    • which belongs to the Imaginations, into which the soul enters at
  • Title: Rosicrucianism/Initiation: Lecture I: Research into the Life of the Spirit During the Middle Ages
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    • scholar of the ninth century to imagine Angels, Archangels, or
    • however, be a great mistake to imagine that the scholars of the
    • person himself doesn't interest me, I will imagine him absent;
    • with a little imagination, you may see there elemental Beings. These
    • imagination, the whole rainbow manifests a streaming out of spirit
    • be able to imagine how this gives rise to the element of Water. In
    • following way. Imagine, my dear friends, that here we have a man.
  • Title: Rosicrucianism/Initiation: Lecture II: Hidden Centres of the Mysteries in the Middle Ages
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    • conjures darkness into the Middle Ages out of his own imagination. In
  • Title: Rosicrucianism/Initiation: Lecture III: The Time of Transition
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    • together, the picture, the imagination. I have, however, been able to
    • imaginable importance. Men made the resolve: We will renounce
  • Title: Rosicrucianism/Initiation: Lecture IV: The Relationship of Earthly Man to the Sun
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    • modern man imagines, to walk about on the Earth, or to travel about
    • this relationship, then I must again speak in Imaginations: for these
    • in Imaginations.
    • in imaginative terms — as though he were thrusting his head
    • The Dogma and Ritual of High Magic?
    • hand has degenerated into external magic. There is speculation as to
    • noticed today has about it as it were a magic breath — the
  • Title: Rosicrucianism/Initiation: Lecture VI: The Tasks of the Michael Age
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    • the secrets of the world: he beheld them in Imagination; he beheld
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas III: The Michael Inspiration
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    • [Also known as: The Michael Imagination. e.Ed.]
    • pictures drawn from the imaginative life, which is the expression, the
    • there takes form a cosmic Imagination; one can indeed do no other than
    • form and picture this cosmic Imagination. Just as animals have a
    • saturated picture form, an Imagination in which is displayed how the
    • does not mean that such an Imagination is merely built up out of
    • The Imagination which comes before man out of this experience is one
    • Imagination, we cannot paint it in any humanly arbitrary way; it can
    • He who understands the world can describe it in Imaginations. And
    • connection, there is created the substance of Imaginations, with all
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas IV: A Michael Lecture
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    • the secrets of the world; he saw them in Imagination; he heard and
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas Va: The Michael Impulse and the Mystery of Golgotha (Part I)
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    • knowledge of Imagination, Inspiration, Intuition, may lay hold of the
    • through Imagination and Inspiration, to flow directly into the human
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas Vb: The Michael Impulse and the Mystery of Golgotha (Part II)
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    • him to imagine the whole course of history in such a way that what
    • That is an important Imagination, — Michael overcoming the
    • Let us take this picture and make of it an Imagination. Let us try to
  • Title: Lecture: Michaelmas VII: The Creation of A Michael Festival Out Of The Spirit (Extract)
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    • plants could grow on the earth, if it were what geology imagines; even
  • Title: Poetry/Fairy Tales: Lecture 1: The Poetry of Fairy Tales
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    • conflicts, which in our daily life we simply cannot imagine are
    • should not imagine that all these occurrences in our soul are simply
    • invisible spirit-friends. These unseen playmates you have to imagine
    • you try to imagine this conversation of the soul with itself, an
    • tale magic.
  • Title: Poetry/Fairy Tales: Lecture 2: The Interpretation of Fairy Tales
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    • magic horse. At last they reached a castle made of glass. Long before
    • was at work the magic horse stepped up and wanted to kill the spider.
    • but the magic horse killed them both. Then instantly the glass king
    • from folk imagination; they are never that. The starting point of all
    • comes to him in the image of the “magic horse.” In the
    • revealed in such pictures. We must be able to imagine the situation:
    • “You cannot carry me off yet, for if you do, the magician who
    • imprisons me here as his wife will at once bring me back on his magic
    • Now just imagine how cleverly everything happened. The fox came by
    • the magician who had imprisoned her noticed their flight, he mounted
    • his magic horse to hurry after them. The horse asked him: “How
    • magic horse told the one in front of him to stop. “I will only
    • moment the magic horse reared, threw the robber off, and joined the
    • manner the theme of the cleverness of the magic forces. Then Nemesis
  • Title: Lecture: Moon-birth and Sun-birth. Necessity and Freedom. Stages of the Ancient
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    • connection with the Moon forces — unless it be the imaginative
    • of man, and then imagine he is looking into himself. But he is not
    • Just imagine, if we today required of a man wishing to take his degree
  • Title: Lecture: The Moon-secret Spring and Autumn mysteries
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    • imagine that in its influence the Moon is absent when it does not
    • And now imagine this real experience whereby man sped away from the
    • Initiation — imagine this inner human Easter experience of former
  • Title: Lecture: The Mysteries of Ephesus The Aristotelian Categories
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    • through the spiritual atmosphere of the Ephesian Sanctuary as a magic
    • as a man rises to spiritual Imagination. Spiritual Imagination is, as
    • secrets of the Temples and we can read them imaginatively.
    • abstract thing imaginable. And yet these most abstract things
    • of the schools. Imagine a school in which it was the custom not to
    • buried? For surely one would imagine that that which has been can
  • Title: Significant Facts: Lecture I: A Convulsive Element in Humanity in the Nineteenth Century
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    • — You can well imagine the situation that may arise when the
    • imagine it — A Tibetan tribunal confronted with a whole number
    • old man and has long ceased to imagine that he rules over the
  • Title: Significant Facts: Lecture II: Ancient Occult Magic. The Ahasver Mystery.
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    • Ancient Occult Magic.The Ahasver Mystery.
    • then existing was misused, applied in practices of black magic
    • already there — but, as you can well imagine, in his most
    • knowledge. You can imagine what such Beings in human bodies were
    • became terrible magicians, dread magicians!
    • imagine that the men of Lemurian and Atlantean times did not resemble
    • case, we can imagine it like this: ‘What is it to me that I
  • Title: Significant Facts: Lecture III: The Tragic Wrestling with Knowledge. The Secrets of the Future Sixth Cultural Period.
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    • in himself any possibility of resisting this fate. And now imagine
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture I
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    • us travel backward in time and imagine ourselves with the soul constitution
    • imagine that the feeling for such a thing arose only gradually. To be
    • He is at liberty to imagine that his tongue produced the water, but
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture II
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    • often remarked that eating is not the simple process ordinarily imagined.
    • the human beings from whose imaginations they sprang said to themselves:
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture III
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    • all of you have such a vivid imagination that, in spite of my moving
    • result of an effective imagination. And inasmuch as our eye is an organ
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture IV
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    • spiritual. Imagine the battle Goethe went through in order to bridge
    • seriousness of the search for knowledge. Imagine the effect of such
    • which is to say, from imagination, inspiration and intuition, as striven
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture V
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    • beyond the prose meanings of words into rhythm, rhyme and imagination.
    • declaimed, there must sound rhythm, beat, imagination. This points to
    • harmony, melody, imagination, this fact, even today, makes poetry poetry.
    • thoughts, all true art has arisen. Just as the imagination of Adalbert
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture VI
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    • not so long ago one could not imagine a presentation of Mary, the Mother
    • human state; a face overcome by light. One could not imagine her clothed
    • hardly imagine anything worse than painting for exhibitions. It is horrible
    • or view a picture in a frame, we can imagine ourselves looking out through
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture VII
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    • seized, phantasy has to be suppressed, imagination eliminated; one must
    • artistic approach, man's physical body clothed by an imaginative-spiritual
    • movement is felt artistically in the formation of nose and eyes. Imagine:
    • In truth we cannot imagine the plants in a living way without the green.
    • Imagine
  • Title: Arts and Their Mission: Lecture VIII
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    • imaginative element, the evocation of sounds. Single words give the
  • Title: Kingdom of Childhood: Lecture 2
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    • epoch, seven to fourteen, fantasy and imagination as life-blood of
    • him. Therefore the essential thing is not to imagine that the child
    • imagination and the child can take no great pleasure in it. But if
    • the child can add a great deal to it with his imagination.
    • passes over into the age of imagination and fantasy. It is not the
    • very essence of imagination. For the quality that makes a child under
    • imaginative picture. Therefore in your teaching you must work in
    • imaginative pictures. It is to this that we must appeal, to this we
    • imaginative way, through the various stages which man himself has
    • must work out of observation and imagination, and the children will
    • magical signs of the printed letters of the present day no longer
    • have already become a means of magic because they are merely
    • begin with the picture. That is not a magic sign but something real
    • therefore a teacher in Class A, another in Class B. Just imagine how
    • moment of teaching every teacher imagines that he himself is creating
    • is on fantasy then, on imagination, that our teaching and education
    • to understand a child you must imagine that he does the same as these
    • truth in imaginative pictures. And then our handling of these fairy
  • Title: Kingdom of Childhood: Lecture 3
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    • should first be presented in living, imaginative pictures, through
    • also the case with the external human form. Imagine a human face and
    • through smell. He has not will and imagination but he has will and a
    • make long faces themselves and to imagine that that is what one has
    • Imagine a
  • Title: Kingdom of Childhood: Lecture 4
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    • Development of imaginative qualities in the teacher. The story of the
    • Importance of imaginative stories which can be recalled in later
    • should teach with descriptive, imaginative pictures, for what the
    • suppose for instance that we tell an imaginative story to a child of
    • every imaginable kind of question. Your task in all this is really to
    • pictorial and imaginative way.
    • permeated with imaginative observation. His thinking will all be
    • pictorial imaginative thinking by saying to him: “Touch your
  • Title: Kingdom of Childhood: Lecture 5
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    • the following: Imagine that you want to think over how you first came
    • imagine that you have quite a small child in front of you, one of the
  • Title: Kingdom of Childhood: Lecture 6
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    • Imagine what would happen if the violin could feel what is going on
    • or “Kopf” and people imagine
    • — or so we imagine. But this is not anything we can experience.
  • Title: Kingdom of Childhood: Lecture 7
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    • books. You should start from a pair of scales; let the child imagine
    • following way. Let us imagine that a cannon is fired off somewhere.
    • giving of reports. I could never in my life imagine what it means to
  • Title: Kingdom of Childhood: Questions and Answers
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    • what is usually drawn as lines in this connection is only imagined.
  • Title: Spiritual Science and Medicine -- Lecture I
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    • bearing on morbid phenomena. Please imagine such a diagrammatic
  • Title: Spiritual Science and Medicine -- Lecture IV
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    • different from what we have imagined.
    • must be careful not to imagine that these three are external to one
  • Title: Spiritual Science and Medicine -- Lecture VII
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    • imagination. The lunar influence on the imaginative and creative
    • directly the soul and spirit, promoting creative imagination. The
  • Title: Spiritual Science and Medicine -- Lecture VIII
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    • turn to the opposite direction and imagine the metamorphosis of the
    • looking out and around. And suppose that the tiniest dwarf imaginable
    • of imagination. But if righty conceived and taken up, it can work as
  • Title: Spiritual Science and Medicine -- Lecture XII
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    • thus. If we imagine the earth's surface, the saline substances tend
  • Title: Spiritual Science and Medicine -- Lecture XIV
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    • later on. Only in those who retain in later life a vivid imagination
    • distinct from their imagination and become dry intellectualists, there
    • with creative imagination we find a half-conscious, dreamlike remnant
  • Title: Spiritual Science and Medicine -- Lecture XVII
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    • imagine, but what is made manifest on the surface of the human
    • imagination which are not followed by the will, just as the sleeper
    • its usual state. The hypertrophies of imagination typical of the
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 1
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  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 2
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    • in people like Wulffen, imagines that thoughts come into existence
    • stupid, every bit as stupid as the fellow we have imagined. For when
    • us now imagine, we have such a person before us in childhood. There
    • in order. Imagine you have here physical body and etheric body. [A
    • Imagine you have before you a clever man, an exceedingly clever man —
    • he was always suspicious of black magic in the application. Needless
    • to say, these things do become black magic when they are not handled
    • in the right and proper way.” The Gods use magic, and the
    • difference between white and black magic consists only in this: in
    • white magic one intervenes in a moral, selfless way, and in black
    • magic in an immoral, selfish way. There is no other difference. And
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 3
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    • Imagine we have here the force of gravity. It works in this
    • these forces is in reality not a physically mediated, but a magical
    • connection, a magical connection however which can take effect
    • connection is not a physical, but a magical connection, then you have
    • make contact with the external world. Imagine he is asleep. While he
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 4
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    • imaginative consciousness we do actually see rays streaming forth
    • ordinary way, one might imagine that when something like sweating had
    • widespread than one imagines; it is exceedingly frequent among
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 5
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    • than people imagine. Healing and education — and the two are,
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 6
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    • man. If you can see that, then much will become clear to you. Imagine
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 7
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    • imagination to be stimulated by giving him "unfinished"
    • intestinal activity becomes regular — and imagine that thereby
    • specific field of activity in the digestive organisation. Imagine you
    • driven back again. You can well imagine how all the symptoms follow
    • his imagination stimulated — as it can be only when he
    • true fantasy and imagination will help you to make your approach to
    • really become a poet, rich in imagination. And then, having gradually
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 8
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    • Now imagine, conception takes place. In certain circumstances it can
    • is lively and imaginative; she is restless, not merely in her body,
    • imagination and fantasy come not from the head but from the limbs.
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 9
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    • child may be born in a region — we will imagine for the purpose
    • this child that I see before me. Imagine to yourselves this child
    • size, and the rest of the body six times. Imagining this, I see
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 11
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    • her with impressions that are without rhythm. Do not imagine that any
    • imagination. Look up the little book where all the songs are recorded
  • Title: Lecture: Curative Education: Lecture 12
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    • belonged. One could imagine how some special pre-disposition in
    • the Imagination of a fond foster-mother or nurse, whose heart is
  • Title: Art of Healing: Lecture II
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    • Do not imagine that I have any intention of
  • Title: Art of Healing: Lecture III
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    • let us imagine that we are looking for plant-remedies.
  • Title: Spiritual Science and the Art of Healing: Lecture II
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  • Title: Spiritual Science and the Art of Healing: Lecture III
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    • imagine that we are looking for plant-remedies. Gentians
  • Title: Report: An Outline of Anthroposophical Medical Research - 1
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    • Now let us imagine that this does not happen, but, instead, the
    • that oxide of copper has the greatest imaginable effect upon the
  • Title: Report: An Outline of Anthroposophical Medical Research - 2
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    • Now let us imagine that this does not happen, but, instead, the
    • that oxide of copper has the greatest imaginable effect upon the
  • Title: Principle/Economy: Lecture I: The Principle of Spiritual Economy in Connection with Questions of Reincarnation: An Aspect of the Spiritual Guidance of Mankind
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    • childishness if people state or imagine they are the
    • occultists make mistakes in this regard and imagine that they
  • Title: Principle/Economy: Lecture III: More Intimate Aspects of Reincarnation
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    • especially skilled in the use of magical powers. The
    • clairvoyants and magicians. And those human beings who had
    • magical powers whom the Great Leader of the Sun Oracle
    • understand. The Atlantean clairvoyants and magicians, who
    • imaginations that were closely related to the events in
  • Title: Principle/Economy: Lecture IV: Results of Spiritual Scientific Investigations of the Evolution of Humanity: I
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    • memory and with their magical powers. The ether-head had a
    • their tremendous memory and their magical powers, disappeared
    • imaginations?
  • Title: Principle/Economy: Lecture V: Results of Spiritual Scientific Investigations of the Evolution of Humanity: II
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    • of the imagination, the Mystery of Golgotha brought about a
  • Title: Principle/Economy: Lecture VI: On the Occasion of the Dedication of the Francis of Assisi Branch
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    • certain ability of clairvoyance and also certain magical
  • Title: Principle/Economy: Lecture XI: From Buddha to Christ
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    • scholars and scientists, nor from the clairvoyants and Magi
    • intellectually, not the clairvoyants and Magi but those who
  • Title: Lecture I: Man in the Past, the Present and the Future
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    • circles. Imaginations are much more alive than abstract
    • investigate and how we have to conceive it in Imaginations. I assume
    • you all know what I have said about Imaginations in my book
    • Imaginations and not our ordinary ideas which we must have in our
    • anthroposophical lectures have their origin in Imaginations of that
    • Now these Imaginations are much more alive than ordinary abstract
    • pictures of it. Imaginations on the other hand, can be laid hold of by
    • comes from Imaginations and not from abstract concepts. Anyone who
    • speaks on the basis of Imaginations always has them before him as
    • Now what is the position with regard to these Imaginations in our
    • will allow these Imaginations to take effect — that is, to
    • relatively easy to inscribe these Imaginations, but they are
    • spiritual content in Imaginations — I cannot put it any other way
    • want to construct Imaginations than you do, for instance, here. There,
    • Through his imaginative gifts he could see the small elemental beings
  • Title: Lecture II: Man in the Past, the Present and the Future
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    • shall have to give in an unimaginative form, since we are not nowadays
    • whereas the Moon-Initiation gave only Imagination. Sun-Initiation is
    • — though he did not actually see what he imagined he had, for the
  • Title: Lecture III: Man in the Past, the Present and the Future
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    • life have been the attendant of a Roman magistrate and among his
    • by a man called Staudenmaier, entitled Experimental Magic,
  • Title: Lecture IV: The Sun-Initiation of the Druid Priest and His Moon-Science
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    • great exertion through the development once again of Imagination,
    • We must imagine the Druid civilization spread out over a great portion
    • their mode of preparation. All this we must imagine transformed into
    • imaginations that arose, the vague, unconscious flickering-upward of
  • Title: Descriptive Sketches: Lecture II
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    • most important experiences. We must not imagine that all the
    • imaginations depicting how such souls go down to their new
  • Title: Lecture: The Cycle of the Year: Lecture I
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    • Let us picture in our minds the season of December. Let us imagine
  • Title: Lecture: The Cycle of the Year: Lecture IV
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    • today to imagine what the human perception was in this regard, that
    • shaping and imaging elements which reached a climax in the festivals
    • the magic saying contained, they were to apply to Nature, and thus
  • Title: Lecture: The Cycle of the Year: Lecture V
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    • conjured by human imagination that wove through this midsummer time on
  • Title: Lecture I: The Balance in the World and Man, Lucifer and Ahriman
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    • consciousness is the so-called world of Imagination. The world of
    • Imagination is far more inwardly mobile and flexible than our physical
    • rooted as they are in the nerve-process. Poetic imagination has
  • Title: Lecture II: The Balance in the World and Man, Lucifer and Ahriman
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    • I can well imagine that this difficulty might arise in your minds, and
    • them in this limited way, he imagines the earth itself has given rise
    • imagine him to be when we look at him only in the outer Maya, in the
    • middle. Look at this vertical line on the blackboard. Imagine that a
    • There where the skull rested on the cervical vertebrae, imagine a
    • the surface we imagined drawn through the top of the cervical
    • cake mould. Imagine you have a tin mould and you bake
    • filled man with His own being, with His own magic breath, that the
    • influence of this magic breath was able to extend into the regions in
  • Title: Lecture III: The Balance in the World and Man, Lucifer and Ahriman
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    • Now we must not imagine that we are present in this interplay with our
    • us imagine, to take a simple case, that a man is walking along a road.
    • not of course imagine that we see the situation as we perceive things
    • in the physical body; no, we see it imaginatively, in pictures.
    • someone when we return into it. So do we “imaginate” in pictures
    • You must not imagine that an experience of this nature is the only way
  • Title: Poetry/Speech: Lecture II: The Art of Recitation and Declamation
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    • something plastic and formative, something imaginative; in the
  • Title: Poetry/Speech: Lecture III: The Art of Recitation and Declamation
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    • learn her words of magic.
  • Title: Poetry/Speech: Lecture IV: Poetry and the Art of Speech
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    • – will certainly have had in his imagination (in the full
    • imagin
    • injure instinctive, imaginative creation and cripple it; many
    • called Imagination weaves and lives in an element quite other than
    • when it is confronted with Imaginative experience. Indeed, if we
    • are dealing with genuine Imaginations it cannot be lost. For what
    • is disclosed in an Imagination with a view to knowledge is
    • Imagination manifested when the soul gives it an artistic
    • Plays is experienced Imaginatively – down to every single
    • impart artistic form, the Imaginative comes to be something
    • objectively quite different to the form assumed by an Imagination
    • spontaneity and instinctive imagining will be impaired if one
    • magic conjuration,
    • it with our ears, through what our imagination has picked up from
    • especially in the re-creation of a drama, is something imaginative;
    • it is imaginative despite its reality.
    • that too is imaginative, albeit in a special sense. Imagination is
    • imaginings contains the shadow thrown there by imagination.
    • it is lifted out of physical experience through imagination (even
    • if only a reflection, a shadowy image of true imagination) can only
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Poetry/Speech: Lecture VI: Speech-Formation and Poetic Form
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    • intellectual pallor; imagination will not be drawn down through
    • Here the will lives and gives itself form. We must imagine the
  • Title: Poetry/Speech: Lecture V: Poetry and Recitation
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    • crippling of imaginative activity – this is not
    • his youth derived their imaginative, pictorial form from an
  • Title: Poetry/Speech: Lecture VII: The Uttering of Syllables and the Speaking of Words
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    • imaginative and plastic, to a speech-transcendent spirituality
    • inwardly eurythmic, the imaginative and musical configuration of
    • syllable-quantities, the imaginative quality of the sound,
    • Am I that imagine this angel
  • Title: Poetry/Speech: Lecture VIII: The Interaction of Breathing and Blood-Circulation
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    • Wie durch magische Hand öffnet und schliesst
    • truly musical and imaginative qualities of poetry is really saying
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture I: Jesuit and Rosicrucian Training
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    • Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition, but always so that he could
    • find that the pupil has first to call up a vivid Imagination of
    • an Imagination. And no one would be received into the degrees of
    • exercises mean for the whole man. But this Imaginative presentation
    • Imagination, over against the picture of the outcast, God-forsaken
    • about by forsaking the divine path. In contrast to the Imagination of
    • Imagination all details of the life of Jesus from his birth to the
    • ideas; they must work upon his soul in vivid, living Imaginations.
    • really knows how the human soul is transformed through Imaginations
    • Imaginations, because they are concentrated in the most intense,
    • matter of holding before one's mind these Imaginations, as they
    • of the earth, the pupil had to form an Imagination of Babylon and the
    • with great exactitude, for it is a powerful Imagination: King
    • ‘banner of Lucifer’ must first of all be imagined by
    • entirely engrossed in the Imagination of the danger which issues from
    • has had its effect, the other Imagination, ‘The banner of
    • strength-giving Imaginations for the Will which are brought before
    • Imaginations, which means by occult methods, it acquires the capacity
    • Imaginations here indicated, together with the prescribed exercises,
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture II: Rosicrucian Training and Anthroposophical Training
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    • studium — the acquiring of Imagination, the reading of the
    • the Threshold, there arises of necessity an Imaginative picture, a
    • him appears to us in the great Imaginative picture of Christ Jesus
    • us yet another significant Imagination. If we had never read a
    • imagination the Temptation, and the scene on the Mount of Olives.’
    • call forth the Imaginations which are contained in the Gospels.
    • pictures, the Imaginations, of the Gospels.
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture IV: Experiencing the Christ Impulse, Jerome and the Gospel of St. Matthew
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    • post-Christian life. If a person cannot imagine such a thing
    • this is something that passes like a magic breath through the first
    • reason, how can we think that He whom we imagine to be possessed of
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture VI: St. John and St. Paul, First Adam and Second Adam
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    • described in such detail that if we wish to picture it in imagination
    • we can imagine that the Lucifer influence poured forces into the
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture VII: The Mystery of Golgotha, Greek, Hebrew and Buddhist Thought
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    • about this, let us imagine our human nature, in so far as it consists
    • process which an analogy will help us to understand. Imagine you are
    • Imagine that someone puts a mirror in front of you. Now ‘Smith’
    • original cell. Now imagine that, through what we may call a mystical
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture VIII: The Two Jesus Children, Zoroaster and Buddha
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    • simply imagine that the substance poured down from the Spirits of
    • the deepest imaginable significance. And in fact this significance
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture IX: The Exoteric Path to Christ
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    • provincial theatre. We can no longer imagine such a thing, because
  • Title: From Jesus to Christ: Lecture X: The Esoteric Path to Christ
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    • Imagination of the Washing of the Feet. Thus the picture of this in
    • the John Gospel is not the first thing to be imagined; the aspirant
    • experiences a transformation of this feeling into an Imagination. And
    • this Imagination corresponds exactly to the scene represented in the
    • feeling comes not only to an Imagination of the Washing of the Feet,
    • Imagination of the Scourging when we place the following vividly
    • strokes of a scourge against his own skin, and the Imagination arises
    • ethical, he feels this idea as so magical an impulse that he becomes
    • speech will come to have an effect unimaginably greater than it has
    • there is no human speech which works so magically that when a moral
    • as though permeated with magical morality. Otherwise men would not be
    • them, of those Imaginations which place before our spiritual gaze the
    • the Imagination of the mount on which the Cross was raised, that
  • Title: Deed of Christ: Lecture 1: Mephistopheles and Earthquakes
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    • lapsed into the practice of a form of black magic; having been led
    • world. The mighty influence of the forces of black magic which finally
    • you. Many forces that are applied in black magic and are connected
    • magic by the descendants of the Atlanteans in ancient Persia would
    • powers. It is a fact that in certain school of black magic such
    • fallen into perverse and evil paths. Centers of black magic and its
  • Title: Lecture: (On) Apocalyptic Writings - I
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    • Persian Magi. And from these memoranda arose the first beginnings of
  • Title: Education: Lecture I: Science, Art, Religion and Morality
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    • in this direct, inner life of imaginative vision man could perceive
    • instinctive imagination thus gleaned from the universe, he made
    • ‘Imaginative Knowledge’ in my book,
    • This ‘Imaginative Knowledge’ — to-day
    • cannot summon the invisible by some magical process. All that can be
    • in this hall — begin to yawn, because they imagine that
    • is raised into Imagination. We stand in a world of Imagination,
    • yet possess this objective world itself in Imagination, we have
    • Imagination. When the spiritual world pours into the consciousness
    • Having experienced Imagination, we may through an inner denial of
    • for true Imagination, it leads not only to knowledge or to art that in
    • the old imaginative knowledge of which I have spoken, which
    • Imagination, and thence to Inspiration. If he re-acquires all that
  • Title: Education: Lecture II: Principles of Greek Education
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    • aside and imagine that the only possible thing is something radically
    • seemed the purest nonsense to imagine that the highest development of
    • purest nonsense to imagine that anyone could become a perfected human
  • Title: Education: Lecture III: Greek Education and the Middle Ages
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    • to imagine that the force which pushes up the second teeth at about
    • is readily imagined, in a straight line from one stage to another.
  • Title: Education: Lecture IV: The Connection of the Spirit with Bodily Organs
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    • lecture as the first stage of exact clairvoyance, as Imaginative
    • imaginative. Nothing whatever can really be grasped by
    • imaginative pictures which now fill the soul in place of the
    • so does Imaginative Knowledge, the first stage of exact clairvoyance,
    • in so far as the organism is physical. Similarly, through Imaginative
    • for us an outer picture, a Nature Imagination of the process of
    • with a skeleton-like thinking must be led over into imaginative
    • clairvoyance — that of Imaginative Knowledge. Here we begin to
    • has reached the stage of exact, imaginative clairvoyance, knows, for
    • greater detail in my books), if beyond Imagination, one attains
    • ‘imagination;’ to have shown also how that which finds
  • Title: Education: Lecture VI: Walking, Speaking, Thinking
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    • given up to the Cosmos in an imaginative, dreamlike existence. This
    • imagines the table to be a living thing, he endows it with imaginary
    • imaginatively endow the table with life, or with anything at all, but
    • imagination in which his early years are passed. For if we allow his
  • Title: Education: Lecture VII: The Rhythmic System, Sleeping and Waking, Imitation
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    • imaginative element must dominate all that the child is given to do;
    • speaks of it only in empty abstractions, while spiritualism, imagining
  • Title: Education: Lecture VIII: Reading, Writing and Nature Study
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    • differently. Suppose, for instance, we give the child an imaginative
    • is filled with imagination. The plants, the trees, the clouds all
    • use of this imaginative, pictorial method in education in the way I have
  • Title: Education: Lecture IX: Arithmetic, Geometry, History
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    • works upon the child's conceptual and imaginative faculties, anything that
    • Imaginative Cognition, a super-sensible, etheric body. Again he has an
    • that all impressions of an imaginative or pictorial nature made on the
    • 1850. Now imagine that you are standing here and stretching your arm
  • Title: Education: Lecture X: Physics, Chemistry, Handwork, Language, Religion
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    • and imaginative. Abstract reasoning from cause to effect should not
    • imagination. In short each different language is related to the human
    • become chaotic. They imagine themselves firmly rooted in reality
    • other extreme, imagining that this will put it right. The consequence
    • the greatest imaginable significance. It may seem paradoxical, yet it
    • even though it can only be in the life of imagination, this will
  • Title: Education: Lecture XI: Memory, Temperaments, Bodily Culture and Art
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    • imagine in a materialistic sense that the body does everything, for
    • imagine that reforms can be introduced into education by the reiteration
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture I
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    • and mankind. They imagine that our present state of existence
    • us imagine however that the things about which we have been
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture II
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    • was entirely within it. On the one hand it is hard to imagine a
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture III
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    • imagines, though human intellectualism is far too crude to
    • imagine what he undergoes when he learns to read and write. In
    • the kind of pictures we need. Fantasy, imagination
    • to the English imagination than to fantasy. In this
    • develop his fantasy if he is to imagine this as having the
    • child are so damaging when given as toys. As I said, today
    • are able to form imaginatively a picture of this inner side of
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture IV
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    • we can well imagine how fundamentally the principle of
    • a kind that it works in a pictorial, imaginative way. And I
    • imaginatively and pictorially everything that we wish him
    • to the child's pictorial, imaginative sense, and this we do if
    • only look at these things quite crudely. Imagine that the human
    • formed in a completely one-sided way. By imagining such an
    • himself against a table he imagines the table to be alive and
    • this imaginative capacity into the child. But the soul
    • reflex action is set up without his imagining that the table is
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture V
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    • question. You can well imagine that we have to deal with all
    • Everything perceived through imagination, inspiration and
    • phrenologist. Do not imagine that I am standing up for
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture VI
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    • time has been imaginative and pictorial must pass over, for
    • idea what it was all about. Just imagine that up till now there
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture VIII
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    • kingdoms, not in the plant kingdom. Just imagine a sculptor who
    • us. If we imagine ourselves now living in the world as a child
    • grandfather. If you imagine placing son, father and grandfather
  • Title: Human Values in Education: Lecture X
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    • imagined that at a certain moment someone was struck with a
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture I: Introduction - Aphoristic remarks on Artistic Activity, Arithmetic, Reading, and Writing
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    • individual. Imagine that we approach the child in this way
    • board. Now just imagine that you are saying the word fish. What
    • and his greatest imaginable joy will be when he puts
    • and which we cannot transfer directly to anyone else. Imagine
    • “Imagine you are a chrysalis like this yourself. Your
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture II: On Language - the Oneness of man with the Universe
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    • from the nervous system. If, for instance, you imagine sight, a
    • superficially. They imagined that we imitated in speech the
    • For do not imagine that this feeling is unfruitful! Man is so
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture III: On the Plastically Formative Arts, Music, and Poetry
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    • imagination what is dying in concepts, do we save
    • and not through human abstract organization. Only imagine what
    • service. For just imagine what a great cultural problem the
    • truer than we imagine that, in Shakespeare's words
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture IV: The First School-lesson - Manual Skill, Drawing and Painting - the Beginnings of Language-teaching
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    • whole course of teaching. Let us imagine, without more delay,
    • opinion on everything imaginable, but that between the seventh
    • course, fully justified. Only it must not therefore be imagined
    • imagine what would have resulted if people had had to sit down
    • imagine themselves very wise and who say: “Why should not
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture V: Writing and Reading - Spelling
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    • own free imagination. I should first say to the child at this
    • your imagination to your aid and say to yourselves:
    • imagination; there is no need to go into histories of
    • imagination to trace for the child a path like this from
    • soul's making, of your own imagination. The activity which you
    • you succeed in making the child imagine — by appealing to
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture VI: On the Rhythm of Life and Rhythmical Repetition in Teaching
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    • are carried out. Do not imagine that I object to such
    • you imagine from all this the state of his soul in 1790 and ask
    • you will frequently find in people who imagine that they have
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture VII: The Teaching in the Ninth Year - Natural History - the Animal Kingdom
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    • the head. It is prejudice which causes people to imagine that
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture VIII: Education After the Twelfth - History - Physics
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    • Imagine for the moment that you are giving this lesson. There
    • gravitation?” And imagine what would happen if a
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture X: Arranging the Lesson up to the Fourteenth Year
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    • yourself to ancient times and imagine, in my place, a Greek
    • imagine, sitting next to this rhapsodist, someone taking
    • to what gives the children the greatest imaginable pleasure: to
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture XI: On the Teaching of Geography
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    • blue lines of the rivers, red lines, which are now imaginary
    • imaginative powers, on your gift for invention. When you tell
    • pass from every imaginable subject to geography. You will not
    • and every imaginable limitation, actually, and, moreover,
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture XII: How to Connect School with Practical Life
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    • disappeared now. A few weeks ago I ransacked all the imaginable
    • Do not imagine that the effect is to make the child idealistic
    • imagine that the child will be more idealistic later in life
    • another, has the most beneficent influence imaginable on the
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture XIII: On Drawing up the Time-table
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    • excite the imagination profoundly; that is, fairy tales. As
  • Title: Practical Course/Teachers: Lecture XIV: Moral Educative Principles and their Transition to Practice
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    • imaginative faculty or the faculty of fantasy. If, for the sake
    • his imagination. If you describe the shape or origin of a Greek
    • literally stifle the imagination. And you do not do amiss in
    • Whereas if you have sown his imagination with seeds of life he
    • lessons can reinforce the fantasy or imagination quite
    • school years. Imagination or fantasy is not enough without
    • imagination, that the child can still imagine for himself, in
    • the child and the world in the sphere of his imaginative
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture I
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    • imagine that we, of ourselves, should initiate a new world-wide order
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture II
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    • through heightened antipathy, Imagination through heightened sympathy,
    • Concepts produce carbonic acid, imaginative pictures oxygen. Need for
    • — then out of sympathy there arises imagination. Just as memory
    • arises out of antipathy so imagination arises out of sympathy. And if
    • your imagination is sufficiently strong (which only happens
    • of sympathy and imagination has become picture form.* But when we form
    • * German: Imaginationen.
    • picture-forming and imagination works out of the human being. This is
    • to the child. You must rather introduce imaginative pictures. Why is
    • this? Imaginative pictures stem from picture-forming and sympathy.
    • imaginations as possible, if you educate him as much as possible by
    • imagination: two systems which we shall be able to apply practically
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture III
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    • most clearly by the following hypothesis: imagine that your two arms
    • this throwing out: imagine a solution where something is being
    • dissolved, and then imagine that this dissolved substance is separated
    • imagine, as it were, a fine rain falling continuously from the
    • imagination. There is much that is hidden and unknown behind the
    • manifest events of the world. Now imagine, for example, that you are
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture V
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    • at all if one imagined that feeling played into it.” He meant
    • except by way of spiritual science. External science imagines that it
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture VI
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    • Imagine you lay a third post across the top of them. Now notice
    • imaginable, a fearful pain.
    • human body. Imagine to yourself for a moment that you are walking but
    • observing the world. Imagine to yourself that it was not your lower
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture VII
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    • do in Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition. But spiritual
    • imagines that psychologists have something to learn from the poets!
    • mere verbal explanations. And we can imagine what sort of things the
    • processes take place (the dark shading in the drawing). Now imagine
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture X
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    • bones are transformed vertebrae. Imagine some organs puffed out and
    • put it on. Now it is comparatively easy to imagine what a glove or a
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture XI
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    • school concerned with breast man. Relation of memory and imagination
    • have a damaging effect upon the head spirit. This is why I told you
    • over-stimulate his imagination and fantasy we retard his growth.
    • Memory and imaginative fantasy have a certain secret relation to the
    • must ask himself: How can I get the right balance between imagination
    • of imagination, who transform everything in their minds, and those on
    • also by means of the powers of imagination and memory themselves; for
    • memory, and too slowly if he had too much imagination. It is not
    • human being the working together of body, soul and spirit. Imaginative
    • psychological book. Imagination exists; it, too, is described. But in
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture XII
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    • really remains in you? You can look at a human being. Imagine that you
    • process. Imagine that it simply comes about in the following way.
    • Imagine to yourselves that by some kind of photographic trick you
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture XIII
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    • understand the forms of the limb man is to imagine the head forms
    • significance in the life of man.) Consider your forehead, and imagine
    • And what is man in respect to this soul and spirit? Imagine a flowing
  • Title: Study of Man: Lecture XIV
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    • warmth necessary as correspondence, i.e. Imagination. Examples in
    • imaginative treatment of subjects. Camera Obscura and theorem of
    • complicated than is usually imagined: because what is present in the
    • also; so that you can imagine a remarkable tendency of this invisible
    • teething of the soul, so all activity of imagination, all that is
    • that shows itself, namely, in the power of imagination. It is to this
    • power of imagination that we must especially appeal in the latter part
    • neglecting to bring imagination continually into the growing power of
    • child's imagination in all we teach him, in all the lessons he has to
    • steeped in imagination.
    • And we do really appeal to the child's imagination if, for instance,
    • we are, once again, really appealing to the child's imagination. For
    • must consistently appeal to the imagination. We appeal to the
    • imagination if, in dealing with plane surfaces, for instance, we
    • thoroughly comprehensible that a child needs to use his imagination
    • be helping the child's imagination when we show him that the powder
    • imagination. He will follow the surfaces with his imagination. He will
    • imagination). He will grasp the theorem with his imagination.
    • imagination between teacher and child. The teacher must keep alive all
    • his subjects, steep them in imagination. The only way to do this is to
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  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture I: The Necessity for a Spiritual Insight
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    • we (in our turn) must develop imagery, imagination. If we ourselves
    • So that in this third period of life we are directed to Imagination,
    • teachers to work from out of Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture II: Spiritual Disciplines of Yesterday: Yoga
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    • receives “Imaginations.” One gets pictures. And a
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture III: Spiritual Disciplines of Yesterday and To-day
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    • whereby the eye can make light perceptible to man? Imaginatively
    • psychic-spiritual means without damaging our bodies' fitness by
    • reviewed all this clearly in one's mind, one can try imagining —
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture IV: Body Viewed from the Spirit
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    • sorrow and grief, then through one's sorrowful bearing one is damaging
    • pictures to the child's imagination: for instance through biographies
    • which present a picture, an imagination of goodness to the child's
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture V: How Knowledge Can Be Nurture
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    • In this way, if you proceed spiritually, imaginatively, and not
    • the instruction as imaginatively as possible, when we let the plants
    • imaginatively.
    • pictorially and appeal to the wholeness of the imagination the child
    • animals with imaginative vision, instead of with the abstract
    • much or too little? When we teach pictorially and imaginatively, as I
    • appeal to the child's imagination: a heap of apples, — and three
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture VII: The Organisation of the Waldorf School
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    • can easily imagine; they are mostly concerned with habits of life, and
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture VIII: Boys and Girls at the Waldorf School
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    • sense-organ much more closely than one would imagine. For, the purpose
  • Title: Curative Eurythmy: Lecture 1
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    • think of this part somewhat transformed; imagine the diameter of the
    • ribs greatly reduced. Imagine that which is very wide in the ribs, in
    • by cartilage. That part which I isolated as the head, imagine that to
    • with a liquid solid mass replaced. When you imagine this transformation
    • imagine what sort of conditions arise; simply because he has the thyroid,
    • the animalic; when you wish, you can always imagine that one evolves
  • Title: Curative Eurythmy: Lecture 2
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    • and “A”, it is not especially damaging if they carry out the
    • of bending, or of widening and so on, but to imagine oneself simultaneously
  • Title: Curative Eurythmy: Lecture 4
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    • B. Now imagine that done more and more quickly and repeated to begin
    • and then in one's fantasy imagines that one hears the “I”
  • Title: Curative Eurythmy: Lecture 5
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    • Now imagine you make this movement repeatedly, one after another: sympathy,
    • out slowly. It is indeed a movement which brings forth the imagination
    • of sleep in the observer; imaginatively one falls asleep in a way with
    • for something. Imagine it carried out ten times consecutively and
    • Now imagine
    • will take a look at another variety (of movement). Imagine every sort
    • the other at an angle. Now let us imagine it in this way: Mrs. Baumann
    • us imagine the movement so: one of the ladies stands here, the other
    • man are the reverse of one another. Thus every imaginable iambus in
  • Title: Curative Eurythmy: Lecture 6
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    • self-aware. Thus the process is extraordinarily similar to imagination.
    • It is a subtle, conscious imagining that is still strongly suppressed
  • Title: Curative Eurythmy: Lecture 7
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    • imagination. If imagination develops further and becomes conscious in
    • the soul stage by stage from objective sensory perception to imagination,
    • Imagination
    • imagination, inspiration and intuition always has its counter-activity
    • what we attain in imagination are the same powers which, without our
    • consonants, the unconscious imaginative forces which call forth a
    • with imaginative forces. These must be supplied. Therefore one will
    • complex of symptoms, all of which indicate that the imaginative forces
    • eurythmy you will call forth the objectively effective imaginations
    • imaginations which continuously counter the deformation.
    • imagination. We could have to do with a deficiency of objective inspiration
    • This consonantal process works by stimulating through its imagination
    • consonantal eurythmy. And that works over into the unconscious imagination.
  • Title: Curative Eurythmy: Lecture 8
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    • has thus to do with the following. Imagine that you place an A-movement
  • Title: Lecture: A Lecture on Eurythmy
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    • imaginative pictures. It is necessary, however, entirely to free
    • kind of imaginative, painting of what exists in external nature.
    • All that I have been describing can be conjured up in imaginations, in
    • imagination. One who has this imaginative vision perceives how the E
    • find that this breath stream reveals itself to our imagination as
    • sounds which are imaginative, plastic and musical.
    • imaginative, plastic, coloured use of words, their music, rhythm and
    • [The reader must imagine the difference of tone which
    • it were to be imagined that Eurythmy could be taught in the schools
  • Title: Lecture I: Nutrition and Health
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    • the plant, gentlemen, is a magician. It holds the carbon back inside
  • Title: Lecture II: Nutrition and Health
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    • Now think how it is, gentlemen, with this protein. Imagine that you
  • Title: Lecture: Inner Nature of Music: Lecture II
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    • course, one must not imagine that the Devachanic world does not
  • Title: Lecture: Inner Nature of Music: Lecture III
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    • us imagine ourselves back in a distant age, the Lemurian age.
  • Title: Lecture: Inner Nature of Music: Lecture IV
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    • boy, I couldn't imagine that the word was spelled m i r.
    • one first acquires imagination, imaginative cognition. Meanwhile, one
    • imaginative world, one has left one's physical body behind
    • passing from imaginative cognition to cognition through inspiration —
    • of the air is the tone is a naïve concept indeed. Imagine
    • figuratively, this description is a reality. Imagine the earth,
    • but it is not so, this is a reality; imagine yourself out there in
    • necessary clairvoyant imagination to observe the consonants in their
  • Title: Lecture: Inner Nature of Music: Lecture V
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    • but himself as existing in both worlds. You can imagine the
  • Title: Lecture: Inner Nature of Music: Lecture VI
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    • of a fifth. Because he still possessed imaginative consciousness, he
    • in the divine realm. Man still had imaginations, still had
    • imaginations in the musical element. There was still an objectivity,
    • instrument. He had an impression, an imagination, as it were, of a
    • appeared to man at first as imaginations. Musical instruments were
    • came the time when man no longer had imaginations. He still retained
    • the remnants of imaginations, however, though one does not recognize
    • in the fifth, since he no longer has imaginations, and the fifth
    • corresponds to an imagination while the third corresponds to a
    • the sphere of willing. We cannot imagine, for example, that the
    • interval of the fifth is a real experience of imagination. He who can
    • subjective level what imagination is like. One who experiences sixths
    • experience of the fifth is a real imaginative experience. The same
    • imaginations, namely the instruments, he fashions here in the
  • Title: Lecture: Inner Nature of Music: Lecture VII
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    • order to form a correct picture, a true imagination of them, have had
    • experience today with melody. As yet, today, man can hardly imagine
  • Title: Behind the Scenes: Lecture 1
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    • this sense are “black” or “grey” magicians,
    • impulses than is usually imagined. But people hesitate to admit such
  • Title: Behind the Scenes: Lecture 2
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    • individual has his own God, merely imagining that he shares with
    • describes his own egotistical relation to the Angelos, people imagine
  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture One
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    • first is the stage of Imagination, Imaginative Cognition, the second
    • Imaginative Cognition is possessed by one before whose eye of spirit
    • the difference that the pictures revealed by Imaginative Cognition
    • of Imagination may be gained in the following way. Suppose someone
    • imagine a world filled with such colour-forms, reflected in manifold
    • glimmering colour-reflections, but you must imagine it all as the
    • of a being with a fiery, violent nature.’ Now imagine this
    • you have what is called the ‘Imaginative’ world, the
    • world of Imagination. It is nothing to which the word
    • ‘imagination’ (fancy) in its ordinary sense could be
    • Imagination you encounter everything that is behind the sense-world
    • derived from this clairvoyant, Imaginative perception, becomes
    • recognize these beings through Imaginative Cognition knows only their
    • selves when he rises from Imaginative Knowledge to Knowledge through
    • Imagination, and more is learnt about the beings of the world of
    • through Imagination.
    • super-sensible worlds: Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition.
    • Imagination only is reached. Then the spheres of the spiritual world
    • having passed through the stage of Imagination; it is hardly possible
    • for anyone to omit the stage of Imagination and be led at once to the
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  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture Two
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    • Imaginative Cognition, and that this knowledge is gained in the form
    • numbers of human beings, many more than modern man would ever imagine,
    • reaches the highest level of moral Imagination but there are many
  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture Four
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    • appearance or are forthcoming in greater strength. Try to imagine how
    • We can well imagine
    • magic’ science of the ancient Persian kingdom. Thus the
  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture Five
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    • imagine, move through the air as pure abstractions and ultimately unite.
    • pupils might rightly be called, not only great ‘Magi’, great
    • Bethlehem the Magi gave evidence of their union with him. The writer
  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture Seven
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    • well imagine, the great helper of those who have endeavoured to understand
  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture Eight
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    • now imagine this effect intensified to the maximum, the Indian
    • the precepts of the Eightfold Path. Do you imagine that if Buddha
  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture Nine
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    • ‘heavenly host’ — this is the spiritual, imaginative
  • Title: Gospel of Luke: Lecture Ten
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    • would, however, be sheer misapprehension to imagine that what the Law
    • with the vision of Imagination and Inspiration could say about the
    • embroiled in the material world through every imaginable crime, so
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement: Lecture One: The Homeless Souls
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    • For example, I do not believe that many people today could imagine
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement: Lecture Three: The Opposition to Spiritual Revelations
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    • As I said, those who reacted with shock imagined that someone must
    • than the kind of unimaginative absence of anything spiritual at all
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement: Lecture Four: Spiritual Truths and the Physical World
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    • Try to imagine for a moment what it was like in Christian countries
    • imagination, in the audible harmonies of music, or in the words of
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement: Lecture Five: The Decline of the Theosophical Society
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    • is imagined simply as a straight line.
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement: Lecture Six: The Emergence of the Anthroposophic Movement
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    • towards you through the air; they originated in a magical way and
    • lecture today. Imagine if
    • something similar, because they cannot imagine the possibility of
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement: Lecture Eight: Responsibility to Anthroposophy
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    • Imagine a rose bush. It will flower repeatedly. When the old roses
    • Let us imagine that something similar was experienced by a doctor
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture One: Nature is the Great Illusion; Know Thyself
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    • readily imagine that man's first impulse will be to follow the same
    • some particular problem relating to the mineral kingdom. Just imagine
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Two: The Three Worlds and their Reflected Images
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    • imaginary passage of the Sun round the Earth, that is to say,
    • imagined the existence of something like a funnel, as we should call
    • us take the second condition, known to all of you when you imagine
    • that a natural creative imagination is at work in dreams; external
    • stuff of dreams into the imaginative fantasy of waking
    • Imagine that
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Three: Form and Substantiality of the Mineral Kingdom in Relation to the Levels of Consciousness in Man
    Matching lines:
    • he fondly imagines that he is thinking with his head. That is not the
    • centre. It is pure illusion to imagine that man's head consciousness
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Four: The Secret of Investigation into Other Realms through the Metamorphosis of Consciousness
    Matching lines:
    • imagine we have a balance in front of us. If the pointer is
    • book Tesoretto. He gives a graphic description, imaginatively
    • the time can readily be imagined, for the characters and
    • imaginative vision and the creation of their myths. And let us
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Five: The Inner Vitalization of the Soul through the Qualities of the Metallic Nature
    Matching lines:
    • imagine that a mountain looms up before us in our immediate
    • senses and so attain to Imagination. In the normal course of
    • form of imaginations. We become aware of this and then we realize
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Six: Initiation-Knowledge, Waking Consciousness and Dream Consciousness
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    • imagines he understands, but which in effect, as we shall see later,
    • senses; an etheric body perceptible to Imagination by virtue of
    • the position of the ordinary dreamer? Try and imagine concretely the
    • into the world of Imaginations, when he has an intuitive
    • Imagine what this demands of him. If we are to speak of spiritual
    • dynamic world of creative imagination, but at the same time have firm
    • endowed with imagination, yet not succumb to its lures. We must be
    • imagine; with their dreamlike knowledge they knew a great deal about
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Seven: Knowledge of the World of Stars. Differentiation of the Historical Epochs of Mankind and their Spiritual Background
    Matching lines:
    • fragmentary. Imagine how our epoch would appear in the eyes of
    • imagine these beings to be unsympathetic, rather uninviting figures.
    • present, but operates only in the rare cases when black magic is
    • exploit them; black magic is being practised on Earth.
    • degenerates into black magic which is odious and evil. Whilst black
    • magic is a force to be reckoned with, the life emanations are no less
    • for good. They are not black magicians, for black magicians are those
    • to fall victim to black magic. Men would so much like to make visible
    • dawning amongst men. Between all this lies black magic that must be
    • Emanation of chemical forces (black magic).
    • only involve manipulating the physical world through black magic, but
    • magical practices which are fully described in the old books of
    • magic.
    • of these magical ceremonies is to evoke the forces inherent in the
    • things lead directly to black magic which makes use of the spiritual
    • a way that is foreign to our world. The black magician, therefore,
    • these beings. The black magician, however, who works with the Moon
    • honest and upright man can learn from these black magicians. In
    • near to black magic. By exploiting these forces man enters into the
    • associate with human beings. Thus centres of black magic arise where
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Eight: Potential Aberrations in Spiritual Investigation
    Matching lines:
    • clear idea of the location of such beings, of where we imagine them
    • who enter into them. At this point black magic sets in — the
    • involved. The black magician, however, is fully conscious that he is
    • his own. Hence the black magician is perpetually surrounded by
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Nine: Abnormal Paths into the Spiritual World and their Transformation
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    • Initiate with Imaginative Knowledge is immersed in the normal dream
    • Imaginative perception. When confronted by another human being a man
    • counterpart, he imagined in a true dream the aura around him. If he
    • scientific ideas in order to impregnate them with Imaginations
    • impregnating the dream-world with Imaginations. In writing my
    • with the external world, and to impregnate the Imaginative world with
    • that is normally present in Imagination. Thus it was possible
    • a magico-somnambulistic achievement on the part of everyone. But this
    • order to permeate it with Imaginations he meets with
    • world. For were he to imagine for a single moment that he was
    • spiritual for magical ends. We cannot study these
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Ten: Influences of the Extra-Terrestrial Cosmos Upon the Consciousness of Man
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    • however, not only poets who are aware that the magic of the Moon
    • stimulates their poetic imagination, not only lovers who exchange
    • then makes contact with magical forces, i.e. anomalous forces which
    • and have succeeded in developing real Imaginations, then in this Moon
    • sphere during waking life, the world of Imaginations is revealed to us
    • enter into the sphere of Mercury influences these Imaginations pass
    • devoid of reality, but we perceive visions as Imaginations. These
    • Imaginations pass over to the beings corresponding to them.
    • the Imagination pictures, in the images of the true visions, are lost
    • imaginative apprehension of this organ, when he gradually begins to
    • be able to see the human organisation in Imaginations.
    • imagine that we can develop spiritual insight by means of laboratory
    • imagination to the right source. The remarkable thing about Blavatsky
    • Imagination than it is immediately realized. Guided by the
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Eleven: What is the Position in Respect of Spiritual Investigation and the Understanding of Spiritual Investigation?
    Matching lines:
    • than one usually imagines; it knows also a sentient life and
    • to admit it. One cannot imagine a divine-spiritual Presence that
    • if we imagine that we cannot have such an understanding without first
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture One: Nature is the Great Illusion; Know Thyself
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    • readily imagine that man's first impulse will be to follow the same
    • some particular problem relating to the mineral kingdom. Just imagine
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Two: The Three Worlds and their Reflected Images
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    • imaginary passage of the Sun round the Earth, that is to say,
    • imagined the existence of something like a funnel, as we should call
    • us take the second condition, known to all of you when you imagine
    • that a natural creative imagination is at work in dreams; external
    • stuff of dreams into the imaginative fantasy of waking
    • Imagine that
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Three: Form and Substantiality of the Mineral Kingdom in Relation to the Levels of Consciousness in Man
    Matching lines:
    • he fondly imagines that he is thinking with his head. That is not the
    • centre. It is pure illusion to imagine that man's head consciousness
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Four: The Secret of Investigation into Other Realms through the Metamorphosis of Consciousness
    Matching lines:
    • imagine we have a balance in front of us. If the pointer is
    • book Tesoretto. He gives a graphic description, imaginatively
    • the time can readily be imagined, for the characters and
    • imaginative vision and the creation of their myths. And let us
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Five: The Inner Vitalization of the Soul through the Qualities of the Metallic Nature
    Matching lines:
    • imagine that a mountain looms up before us in our immediate
    • senses and so attain to Imagination. In the normal course of
    • form of imaginations. We become aware of this and then we realize
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Six: Initiation-Knowledge, Waking Consciousness and Dream Consciousness
    Matching lines:
    • imagines he understands, but which in effect, as we shall see later,
    • senses; an etheric body perceptible to Imagination by virtue of
    • the position of the ordinary dreamer? Try and imagine concretely the
    • into the world of Imaginations, when he has an intuitive
    • Imagine what this demands of him. If we are to speak of spiritual
    • dynamic world of creative imagination, but at the same time have firm
    • endowed with imagination, yet not succumb to its lures. We must be
    • imagine; with their dreamlike knowledge they knew a great deal about
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Seven: Knowledge of the World of Stars. Differentiation of the Historical Epochs of Mankind and their Spiritual Background
    Matching lines:
    • fragmentary. Imagine how our epoch would appear in the eyes of
    • imagine these beings to be unsympathetic, rather uninviting figures.
    • present, but operates only in the rare cases when black magic is
    • exploit them; black magic is being practised on Earth.
    • degenerates into black magic which is odious and evil. Whilst black
    • magic is a force to be reckoned with, the life emanations are no less
    • for good. They are not black magicians, for black magicians are those
    • to fall victim to black magic. Men would so much like to make visible
    • dawning amongst men. Between all this lies black magic that must be
    • Emanation of chemical forces (black magic).
    • only involve manipulating the physical world through black magic, but
    • magical practices which are fully described in the old books of
    • magic.
    • of these magical ceremonies is to evoke the forces inherent in the
    • things lead directly to black magic which makes use of the spiritual
    • a way that is foreign to our world. The black magician, therefore,
    • these beings. The black magician, however, who works with the Moon
    • honest and upright man can learn from these black magicians. In
    • near to black magic. By exploiting these forces man enters into the
    • associate with human beings. Thus centres of black magic arise where
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Eight: Potential Aberrations in Spiritual Investigation
    Matching lines:
    • clear idea of the location of such beings, of where we imagine them
    • who enter into them. At this point black magic sets in — the
    • involved. The black magician, however, is fully conscious that he is
    • his own. Hence the black magician is perpetually surrounded by
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Nine: Abnormal Paths into the Spiritual World and their Transformation
    Matching lines:
    • Initiate with Imaginative Knowledge is immersed in the normal dream
    • Imaginative perception. When confronted by another human being a man
    • counterpart, he imagined in a true dream the aura around him. If he
    • scientific ideas in order to impregnate them with Imaginations
    • impregnating the dream-world with Imaginations. In writing my
    • with the external world, and to impregnate the Imaginative world with
    • that is normally present in Imagination. Thus it was possible
    • a magico-somnambulistic achievement on the part of everyone. But this
    • order to permeate it with Imaginations he meets with
    • world. For were he to imagine for a single moment that he was
    • spiritual for magical ends. We cannot study these
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Ten: Influences of the Extra-Terrestrial Cosmos Upon the Consciousness of Man
    Matching lines:
    • however, not only poets who are aware that the magic of the Moon
    • stimulates their poetic imagination, not only lovers who exchange
    • then makes contact with magical forces, i.e. anomalous forces which
    • and have succeeded in developing real Imaginations, then in this Moon
    • sphere during waking life, the world of Imaginations is revealed to us
    • enter into the sphere of Mercury influences these Imaginations pass
    • devoid of reality, but we perceive visions as Imaginations. These
    • Imaginations pass over to the beings corresponding to them.
    • the Imagination pictures, in the images of the true visions, are lost
    • imaginative apprehension of this organ, when he gradually begins to
    • be able to see the human organisation in Imaginations.
    • imagine that we can develop spiritual insight by means of laboratory
    • imagination to the right source. The remarkable thing about Blavatsky
    • Imagination than it is immediately realized. Guided by the
  • Title: True/False Paths: Lecture Eleven: What is the Position in Respect of Spiritual Investigation and the Understanding of Spiritual Investigation?
    Matching lines:
    • than one usually imagines; it knows als1> a sentient life and
    • to admit it. One cannot imagine a divine-spiritual Presence that
    • if we imagine that we cannot have such an understanding without first
  • Title: Art/Mystery Wisdom: Lecture One
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    • people imagine they must take great care not to expose
  • Title: Art/Mystery Wisdom: Lecture Two
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    • inhabits the physical body. For human imaginative perception,
    • (not in the imaginative picture we draw) is mobility,
    • being is not nearly as simple as we would like to imagine in
    • incredibly easy simply to imagine that the human being
    • Now imagine
    • the very first steps, and that we can imagine what these
  • Title: Art/Mystery Wisdom: Lecture Four
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    • imagine for a moment that we are setting out on the path of
    • not imagine that you can approach spiritual beings in the
    • imagine that these things are valuable only in the sphere of
  • Title: Art/Mystery Wisdom: Lecture Five
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    • a particular example to start from. We will simply imagine
    • another example. Let us imagine we do the same thing with a
    • we have to imagine the tones as windows.
    • soul. It is like a magic wand that conjures up the secrets of
  • Title: Art/Mystery Wisdom: Lecture Six
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    • nature one after the other. And they imagine how boring life
    • Spiritual science must become a magic draught of youth and
  • Title: Art/Mystery Wisdom: Lecture Eight
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    • (procesus vertebralis). And if you imagine one of
    • how you must imagine a tubular upper arm bone being turned
    • imagine the domes kept apart. Imagine that on one side, this
    • With the main building in mind, imagine that here (south) you
    • here (a) it has shrunk to nothing instead of growing. Imagine
    • has developed out of the primary forms. For if you imagine
    • Now imagine
    • the forms of the architraves. If you imagine the forces in
    • them. Imagine, that because you have slipped inside, you
    • godforsakenness. It would be impossible to imagine the
    • incentive for really acquiring imagination, inspiration and
    • into the realms that open up to imaginative, inspirational
    • Now imagine
    • imaginations resulting from experiencing the blood
    • collection of imaginations. Yet although, when perceiving the
    • experience of the imaginative world is comparable to swimming
    • in blood like a fish in water. But this imaginative world is
    • within him, as a world of inner imagination. He saw that he
    • himself belonged in the cosmos. He also had an imaginative
    • an imagination of the taste and is not formative, some people
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  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture I
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • imagine that it has always been the same as it is today, that is just
    • We have, therefore, to imagine that what is today solid
    • I have often said here: What do people today imagine?
    • They imagine that originally there was a gigantic mist, that this
    • We must therefore imagine not that a gigantic
    • Imagine that I have a lump of lead in my hand, that is, solid matter,
    • But we must never allow ourselves to imagine that out of the present
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture II
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • as yet no really solid mineral structures. Now you must not imagine
    • world-egg beyond which one could see nothing. And you can imagine how
    • needs firm ground for walking. You can imagine that these creatures
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture III
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • However, you must not imagine that things are always so
    • structure of the creature. One must have the talent to imagine the
    • imagine that the following could happen. Just suppose that a small
    • the lowest — that the strata show it. But can you imagine,
    • Now we could imagine — for anything can happen in
    • earth. They imagine that it contains a glowing gas. But that is not
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture IV
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • anyone imagine that man, physical man as he now is on the physical
    • the following: Imagine a really clever man who has a small son. This
    • hydrocephalic head. Imagine that the Atlantean had this head, but
    • superstitious to imagine that you think with your solid brain. Not
    • can use our imagination), these would have to look different from
    • Now imagine an eagle that was a very clever creature, an
    • once. So we must imagine that these men shaped everything once upon a
    • dense air. Imagine it like this: there is a man of dense air, who has
    • have to imagine that they had no need of muscles and bones, but by
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture V
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • of action where the Atlantic Ocean is now. We have to imagine that
    • language. So you can easily imagine that the ordinary people are not
    • imagine things for themselves. This, gentlemen, constitutes the very
    • Magician's Apprentice” where the apprentice watches the spells
    • of the old master-magician? And then, to save himself the trouble of
    • fetching water, he learns a magic verse by which he will be able to
    • make a broom into a water-carrier. One day when the old magician is
    • out, the apprentice begins to put this magic into practice, and
    • water. But the apprentice forgets how to stop it. Just imagine if you
    • imagine the Indians were going to paint a picture: they would have
    • head. Or if they were painting a plant, they imagined at once that
    • powers of imagination. The Chinese had none at all and drew only the
    • had a powerful imagination.
    • Chinese. The Chinese lack imagination whereas the Indians have been
    • imagine him to be really sour as vinegar is sour. But for the Chinese
    • educated man was a lengthy affair. For, as you can imagine, with them
    • being. You can imagine what different men they were from those who
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture VI
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • This green sap of the plant, gentlemen, is a magician. It holds the
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture VII
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • Imagine that you have become an exceptionally clever person, so
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture VIII
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • peoples imagine man to have been a physically perfect being
    • the way we imagine him in paradise. And in fact, it is not so.
    • poetical imaginations, so that what remained of it is now just taken
    • this can have the magical effect of healing him. I have even known
    • imagine how this request was received. But the man had simply done
    • down to magic, superstition. This happens with very much that lives
    • superstitions, their magical practices and their unclean
    • imagination, an imagination that worked like an instinct. When we
    • today use our imagination we often pull ourselves up and think:
    • Imagination has no place in what is real. This is quite right for us
    • been able to carry on without imagination.
    • imagination possessed by primitive men could have been applied to
    • in the man of primeval times it was imagination; they would have been
    • incapable of making anything if imagination had not enabled them to
    • their souls had great power of imagination. With imagination they
    • made their tools; imagination helped them in all they did, and
    • their imaginative faculty. And when we read the old documents with
    • on a purely spiritual level and all out of imagination. To come to a
    • They never imagined that when they went into the woods, they would
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  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture IX
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • applies equally to other sense-perceptions. Imagine for a moment that
    • inferior to the dog's. And so you can imagine that when a dog runs
    • existed which were even more delicate than that of the dog. Imagine
    • through imagination, if he does not come again to the spirit, then he
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture X
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • Of course, if it is imagined, as most people imagine
    • Imagine the earth here. The sun rises at a certain point
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture XI
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • imagine, at the places where its surface is dark, the sun does not
    • It must never be imagined that evolution proceeds in an
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture XII
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • Now let us imagine that we have this happening
    • single place. You can imagine, of course, that these accumulations of
    • But now imagine that I round out the surfaces of these
    • regular solid, you'll have to explain it by imagining that a great
    • today. Now imagine that I draw this tetrahedron, that I first fling
    • firedamp has occurred!” Now you can imagine the publicity he
    • physicists of today imagine. They would be very astonished if they
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture XIII
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
    • every week, so he couldn't imagine what use railroads would be. It
    • could very easily make a traveler ill by damaging his nerves. When
  • Title: Evolution, Earth, Man: Lecture XIV
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    • an imaginative description of the creation of the world and of human
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul One: Lecture 1: The Mission of Spiritual Science
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    • knowledge”; but we can also speak of “imaginative
    • these myths and legends are attributed to the popular imagination. Those who
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul One: Lecture 2: The Mission of Anger
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    • imaginary lemonade would quench his thirst is another question. The boundary
    • popular imagination arrives at a truth which may often elude the
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul One: Lecture 3: The Mission of Truth
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    • imagine two teachers faced with children who have done something wrong. One
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul One: Lecture 6: Asceticism and Illness
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    • can distinguish between an imaginary piece of hot steel and a real
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul One: Lecture 7: Human Egoism
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    • it attains the highest degree of usefulness that can be imagined for a
    • imagined it could achieve an individual existence apart from the rest of the
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul One: Lecture 8: Buddha and Christ
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    • very difficult to manage. With such super-sensible, hardly imaginable things I
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul One: Lecture 9: Something about the Moon in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • imagination are not equally productive at all times. Poets, for example, if
    • that the productive periods, for which a certain imaginative frame of mind
    • received, to penetrate with his thinking the illuminations, the imaginations
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 1: Spiritual Science and Language
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    • of the imagination, feelings and perceptions, was created initially without
    • imagination, and not to realise that it has been taken from the outside world
    • consciousness — to work towards a symbolic view, an imaginative
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 2: Laughing and Weeping
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    • In such cases, when some loss is brought before a person in imagination only,
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 3: What is Mysticism?
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    • proceeds from ordinary knowledge and goes beyond it is called Imagination;
    • this path. The example most helpful for an understanding of Imagination, or
    • imaginative cognition, has already been mentioned more than once: it is drawn
    • wants to educate a pupil in the higher faculties leading to Imagination would
    • — the teacher might continue — “imagine that man develops further;
    • and again, he will finally attain to Imagination, which shows him that in the
    • the soul could not imagine a red rose unless it had received an impression of
    • external world, and can now be experienced through imaginative cognition, is
    • science, through Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition, we overcome the
    • make progress in imaginative cognition. If we try to deepen our ordinary life
    • this way an imaginative symbolism leads to an experience of truth which
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 4: The Nature of Prayer
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    • forms of cognition, which we called Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition.
    • the spirit which works in the world — not an imaginary, abstract spirit
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 5: Sickness and Healing
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    • instincts, desires, passions, of the surging imagination, perceptions, ideas
    • the bearers of joy and sorrow, judgments, the imagination, etc., cannot
    • thinking if a harmony is imagined into a situation where life has to develop
    • reached if it is merely imagined into a given stage of human
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 6: Positive and Negative Man
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    • leads him through the three stages of Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition,
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 7: Error and Mental Disorder
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    • paradoxical, and it may provoke some reflection in this field, if we imagine
    • today in the following way: “I imagine this human life as a
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 8: Human Conscience
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    • inhabit. Anyone who refuses to believe this may imagine something different,
  • Title: Metaporphoses/Soul Two: Lecture 9: The Mission of Art
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    • heart and the imagination. Many of our contemporaries, accordingly, would say
    • imagine things, including the imaginary gods of the sagas
    • believe it who are imagining things. For people in that remote past, the
    • arising in Homer's poetic imagination something like a substitute for
    • in the soul and could endow it with formative power. Poetic imagination is
    • succeeded in Asia by the substitute for it, imagination, this gave rise
    • imagination that came from the East, while Western influence, with its
    • memories of the pictorial imagination of the East, and how from this
    • clairvoyance reproduced by poetic imagination. And whatever was preserved
    • concerned with external revelations. No one can imagine that Dante could have
    • possible for imagination to depend on external influences. A small fact will
    • came to him from within his own soul. Can you imagine that Dante would have
    • fondly imagine that from the first they were acclaimed in the highest circles
    • cannot imagine that an array of Faust-like figures could have been created,
    • imagination, bestowed on man as a substitute for spiritual vision and given
    • this passes away, he is granted imagination, which creates for him a kind of
    • shadowy reflection of what he can no longer perceive. Imagination has had to
    • Man takes imagination with him on his way; and when
    • appears, we see the spiritual world created anew out of imagination.
    • it can give a view of the spiritual world in imagination, as in the second
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  • Title: Fifth Gospel, Part 2: Lecture I
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    • there are no kings or magi. In Matthew the three kings/magi are
    • Try to imagine yourselves in such a
    • imagined that such a one existed. They did not know what to
    • pagan sacrifice. However, he now saw in vivid imaginations the
  • Title: Fifth Gospel, Part 2: Lecture II
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    • they provide the correct hints: You can imagine yourselves as
    • Imagine that were are sitting in a council
    • to feel this observing the Mystery of Golgotha by imagining
  • Title: On the Development of Human Culture: Lecture I
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    • We have to imagine that where today the Atlantic Ocean is, there was
    • — a more difficult thing to do than people imagine — and
    • can write or in any way master the language. Hence you can imagine
    • from within outwards in the way they have to imagine it to themselves.
    • poem called “The Magician's Apprentice” — we have
    • spells of the old master- magician. As a result, to save himself the
    • trouble of fetching water, by mean? of a magic formula he converts a
    • broom into a water-carrier. One day when the old magician is out, the
    • apprentice forgets how to stop it, Imagine if you had your room
    • Indians. Now just imagine the Indians were going to paint a picture;
    • in the case of a plant, if they were painting a plant, they imagined
    • powers of imagination. The Chinese had none at all and drew only the
    • Indians had this powerful imagination.
    • different people from the Chinese. The Chinese lack imagination
    • mean it figuratively; we do not imagine him really to be sour in the
    • For, as you can imagine, it was not just a matter of a man going
    • world in the human being. Naturally you can imagine what
    • know, they developed those tremendous powers of imagination expressed
  • Title: On the Development of Human Culture: Lecture II
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    • peoples imagined that man as a physical being was originally perfect.
    • world-conception always imagine that originally men were in some way
    • as people today imagine them to have been, that is, of a paradisian
    • peoples; they clothed their knowledge in poetical imaginations, so
    • example, a corner of his shirt — that this can have the magical
    • be cured! You can imagine how this request was received. But
    • and it was put down to magic, superstition. This is o in the case of
    • — with their superstitions, their magical practices, and their
    • imagination, imagination that worked like instinct. When today we use
    • our imagination we often pull ourselves up, saying: Imagination has
    • carry on without imagination.
    • you how this lively imagination possessed by primitive men could have
    • in the man of primeval times it was imagination; they would have been
    • incapable of making anything had not imagination enabled them to do
    • souls had great powers of imagination. With imagination they
    • made their tools; imagination helped them in all they did, enabled
    • ancient times devised and organized out of their imaginative
    • out of imagination. To come to a thorough realization of this you
    • they never imagined they would meet Wotan there in the guise of an
    • speak — not in an intellectual way but out of imagination. Our
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  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture I
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    • imagine how wise it must be!
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture II
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    • imagine any other form of cell there would always be spaces,
    • from the forces of the Sun. So you see, you can easily imagine how
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture III
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    • carried out today. One can naturally not imagine anything more absurd
    • will give you an example from life. Imagine for a moment, that all of
    • aware of them. Imagine you are in a kitchen where the stove is nice and
    • imagine that this is a proceeding demanding much stronger forces than when
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture IV
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    • I imagine that
    • imagine the following. Picture to yourselves some poor child not so fortunate
    • Just imagine
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture V
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    • intellectually. But now I should like to tell you this: imagine you
    • blood looks like blood. But if you imagine a gigantic
    • mouse had got into the hive and died there, and now imagine what a terrible
    • One cannot imagine that a man paid by the hour, or in any sense
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture VI
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  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture VIII
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    • the greater nuisance do the ants become. Imagine a house, and in one
    • living as the flowers of today. If you can imagine to yourselves that
    • away.” Just try to imagine all that moulders away in the
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture IX
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  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture I
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    • written the lecture down, and we need but to imagine that a
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture II
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    • sense of the whole. You cannot imagine, if you think
    • to behold a picture, an imagination in every single word; and
    • attention to these things because one imagines: there in
    • say it. But imagine, if someone were to represent it as a
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture IV
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    • imagine that the whole pedantry of thinkers could inwardly appear
    • to the wind. One can imagine what an effect such a statement had in a
    • imagine how indigestion in turn affects actions, and how public
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture V
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    • ourselves first in imagination, in inner experience —
    • represented values. If you imagine how at that time
    • should imagine that one confronts a giant frog with an open
    • Naturally, you must now imagine that horses whistle! Now you
    • the sense of creating imagination. He who cannot occupy
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture VI
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    • Imagine in front of you, dear Christians, there stands a
    • attempting to organize in a threefold way? Imagine a country
    • nothing more beautiful could be imagined. The people who
  • Title: The Development of Thought from the 4th to the 19th Century - 1
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    • historian, by the element of imagination working in the condensation
    • according to his power of synthesis, his imagination and other
    • with ourselves if we imagine that the words convey any real meaning.
  • Title: The Development of Thought from the 4th to the 19th Century - 2
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    • developed the pictorial imaginations which these men connected with their
    • their old ancestor-imaginations and dreams, men felt something holy to be
    • developed a magical life. Everywhere human beings had premonitions,
    • ghostly and magical character of the stories men recount gets charmingly
    • in human evolution. Out of this ghostly-magical element of presentiment,
  • Title: Anthroposophy Science: Lecture I
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    • know anything. Just imagine how incompatible such a uniting
    • by imagining how you know something of a mathematical nature,
  • Title: Anthroposophy Science: Lecture III
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    • imaginative level. Later I will describe the way in which
    • this imaginative level of knowledge is reached through
    • develop an understanding of what this imaginative level of
    • who strives toward what I call imaginative knowledge. When we
    • development of imaginative cognition. And this brings me to
    • person who strives to rise to the imaginative level of
    • which lead in the direction of imaginative forms. Our first
    • concern must be that everything that leads to an imaginative
    • imaginative cognition is to have dealt as much as possible
    • is meant here by the attainment of imagination. For in the
    • case of imagination we have an enhancement of consciousness,
    • toward imaginative knowledge as a striving toward
    • Imaginative vision is the opposite of this, as I will now
    • imaginative vision is something that can only be present in
    • a while people imagined the situation in a rather crude way,
    • imaginative cognition, the whole problem is transformed. He
    • the eye through his faculty of imagination. In a mathematical
    • what we have imagined comes to meet the outer processes. For
    • one who has developed imaginative cognition, it is not only
    • imaginative images developed in accordance with imaginative
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  • Title: Anthroposophy Science: Lecture IV
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    • developing the ability to form imaginative vision, it is
    • imaginative picturing that lives in the soul — as I
    • imaginative activity to the human senses. In this way we may
    • an imaginative faculty and of knowledge of the real nature of
    • other hand we have developed imaginative cognition, at first
    • empirically to the imaginative view. Of course, with our
    • of imaginative mental pictures. For the earth as an integral
    • being reveals itself only to the imaginative faculty, not to
    • to imaginative mental Images, we acquire the ability to
    • imaginative mental images one not only gains understanding of
    • imaginative vision develops further, however, we arrive
    • imagined that the results of something like imaginative
    • acquisition of the imaginative method is easier than the
    • picture. Through this exertion of imaginative life, of
    • result of imaginative mental imaging.
    • will be illuminated by this imaginative cognition in all our
    • Similarly, when we come to inner imaginative perceptions, we
    • imagining. Please do not misunderstand me. The entire
    • imaginative activity is just as voluntary as our ordinary
    • this feeling in relation to the content of the imaginative
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  • Title: Anthroposophy Science: Lecture V
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    • spoke of the development of imaginative cognition — how by
    • world. We learn these things through imaginative cognition as
    • imaginative cognition. Everything that has to do with the
    • when imaginative cognition has been developed: all of this
    • capacity of imaginative cognition has been acquired by us.
    • organism? Only imaginative cognition makes it comprehensible
    • myself was able through imaginative cognition to develop a
    • sense with imaginative cognition (when doing this, I was
    • logical thinking further to imaginative perception. Part of
    • what imaginative perception discloses to us is the individual
    • that becomes clear only to imaginative cognition, when we see
    • may only be viewed imaginatively.
    • comprehend them as imaginations that have become physical.
    • imagination is not, as one might suppose, absent from the
    • expression of imaginative cognition. Were Ziehen to consider
    • take the next step into imaginative thought. But to some
    • beyond the mathematical. I mean, of course, imagination.
    • already have projective-geometric ideas, we may imagine we
    • representative — to imagination. To be sure, with
    • projective geometry, we do not actually have imagination yet,
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  • Title: Anthroposophy Science: Lecture VI
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    • them Imagination and Inspiration. Today I would like to say
    • Imagination with regard to knowledge of the world is attained
    • win the capacity to live in such imaginations of our own
    • The exercise of this capacity results in imaginations rising
    • imaginations have the character of memory pictures. Only
    • are conscious that these imaginations contain a strong inner
    • imaginations remain pure, so that no foreign elements slip
    • imagination we realize the necessity of continually
    • necessary moment. With imaginative pictures, this is just
    • power for imaginative activity. In this respect, certain
    • specifically suited to suppress the imaginative force. If we
    • will actually destroy our imaginative capacity.
    • the imaginations firmly in our consciousness. We are related
    • imaginations so that we can dive down again and again into an
    • imagination, fills with content. This content shows us that
    • order to have a correct relationship to these imaginations.
    • weakens his power to retain and deal with imaginations.
    • realize this when inspiration reveals these imaginations to
    • mirror falls away with regard to the imaginations. When this
    • imaginations and then we see how these imaginations work in
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  • Title: Anthroposophy Science: Lecture VII
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    • imaginative cognition and inspired cognition. Yesterday I
    • showed how, when imaginative and inspired cognition work
    • this experience that we have in inspired-imaginative
    • natural form of cognition into which inspired imaginations
    • avoid possible misunderstanding. I can easily imagine that
    • grasp in inspired-imaginative activity and what we can learn
    • from inspired imagination to intuition, we encounter a
    • imagination, when we apply it to knowledge of the self we
    • We are able to perceive through our inspired imagination how the
    • of illness. When inspired-imaginative cognition is directed
    • already discussed imagination and we know it does in fact
    • imagination fills itself with a real spiritual content that
    • imaginations — although in another way than in the case
    • is really experienced in inspired imagination. The knowledge
    • subjective point of view. The inspired-imaginative condition
    • inspired imagination. The major difference is this: in sleep
    • imagination one's consciousness is filled; one's inner
  • Title: Boundaries of Natural Science: Lecture I
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    • Yet not everyone in these widest circles imagines something clear and
  • Title: Boundaries of Natural Science: Lecture IV
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    • this book, he had to smile. Now imagine how astonished he was: a serious
    • moral imagination [moralische Phantasie]. I employed this term
    • “moral imagination” with conscious intent in order to indicate
    • that — just as with the creations of the imagination
    • reveals itself to us as the content of moral imagination but that when
    • into Imagination. One discovers the higher plane of which moral imagination
    • Imagination. While philosophising, one remains caught within a self-created
    • of Freedom, after transcending the level of imagination [Phantasie],
    • the realities of sense. At this point one attains the realm of Imagination,
    • a thinking in pictures [bildliches Denken]. One attains Imaginations
    • Inspiration is complemented at the other pole by Imagination, and only
    • through Imagination does one arrive at something enabling one to comprehend
    • man. In Imaginations, in pictorial representations
    • one will receive Imagination, through which consciousness can finally
    • out of my past. I must renounce and turn back. But then Imagination
    • reveals itself to me as a world of Imagination.
    • consciousness we approach the pole of Imagination. Once one has
    • grasped these Imaginations
    • described to you yesterday. By having attained Imagination one is able
    • or Imaginations, man's real nature shall elude our grasp. It is not
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  • Title: Boundaries of Natural Science: Lecture V
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    • such ideas and seek rather to enter the realm of Imaginative cognition.
    • is transformed into Imaginative cognition, we shall never progress in
    • on the one hand and Imagination on the other. Whoever is able to perceive
    • of human evolution that tend toward the proper introduction of Imagination
    • took positivism up into himself. I could well imagine how he then reverted
    • Imagination, which, when civilization has acquired it, shall become
  • Title: Boundaries of Natural Science: Lecture VI
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    • cognition: pictorial representation, a life within Imagination. And
    • without entering into this life of Imaginations, modern psychology shall
    • Imagination, there will arise again a psychology that is more than
    • if he desires self-knowledge, should feel himself led toward Imagination.
    • by Imagination. That man is striving to descend deeper into his inner
    • humanity is presently striving for Imagination and that an illness that
    • only by developing Imagination. Agoraphobia — this is an illness that
    • itself as an Imaginative representation of the inner realm. Here a faculty
    • overcome gradually everything spatial in Imagination and to immerse
    • in Imagination, in pictures.
    • that all exercises leading to the life of Imagination protect one against
    • ego out into the world of Imagination in the way that one must carry
    • Imagination through a process of symbolization, through pictorial
    • in Imagination itself all pictures created by mere fantasy disappear.
    • body when we strive for Imagination? Only by developing the power of
    • Imagination to be borne by love, by merging this power of love with
    • Imagination or the pathological tendency to expose ourselves to fear
    • those of Inspiration and Imagination, can join together. The one can
    • a confluence of Imagination and Inspiration in true, spiritual Intuition.
    • Inspiration. By coming to know the human organs through Imagination
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  • Title: Boundaries of Natural Science: Lecture VII
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    • strives for Imagination. It is no longer the experience of the musical
    • reacts by creating Imaginations. This is a path that is only just beginning
    • Western humanity must follow to attain Imagination knows that to find the
    • the difficulty of grasping Imaginations and presenting them in sharp
    • by attaining the realm of Imagination. Only by penetrating into the
    • realm of Imagination will he acquire the true knowledge of humanity
    • this realm of Imagination is something that can be left to the future.
    • No — this world of Imagination, because we have passed into the
    • every variety. An unconscious urge toward Imagination is held back through
    • is made toward Imagination, the true nature of man is experienced inwardly,
    • way. It is this other path through Imagination that must establish the
    • what the true path of Imagination should be, what path must be taken
    • able to confront the now decadent Inspiration of the East with Imaginations
    • we will speak further of the path of Imagination and of how the way to
  • Title: Boundaries of Natural Science: Lecture VIII
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    • into the spiritual worlds is that of Imagination. This faculty of
    • Imagination, however, must be integrated organically into the life
    • And now let us imagine
    • into Imagination. It is possible to pursue this path in a way consonant
    • and our sense of life. And the result of this development toward Imagination
    • Imagination, by a kind of absorption of external percepts devoid of
    • these and enters into them. In striving for Imagination, however, one
    • beauty, and imaginative expression in the writings of many mystics.
    • Imagination, on the other hand we have raised what resulted from our
    • We have developed Imagination, and pure thinking has become Inspiration.
    • The fusion of Imagination and Inspiration brings us in turn to Intuition.
    • he struggles to rise up to spiritual reality in Imagination, Inspiration,
    • to a halt at this point, because he was unable to use Imagination to
    • not that of genuine Imagination and in that Hegel showed as well that
    • if pure thinking does not lead on to Imagination or to Inspiration —
  • Title: Anthro Medical Therapy: Lecture II
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    • imaginative impression. We can easily rise to this once our
    • there is such a thing as imaginative knowledge. Nothing calls
    • forth imaginations so easily as the contemplation of
    • made by the somewhat dilettantish rummaging about of
    • rummaging around in the issue with similar dilettantism,
  • Title: Anthro Medical Therapy: Lecture IV
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  • Title: Anthro Medical Therapy: Lecture V
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    • occur. Now imagine that the astral body and the ego are not
    • poisoning. Imagine, on the other hand, that the outer
    • surface of the earth and rests directly on the water. Imagine
  • Title: Anthro Medical Therapy: Lecture VI
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    • imaginative observation, we frequently receive a direct,
    • one actually was. What is discovered by imaginative
    • from within. Imagine that someone can go and say, “Here
    • imaginations, inspirations. This is what “freeing the
    • indeed form imaginations, but these would remain unconscious.
    • imaginations correctly. On the one hand, the organ is
    • defective and the tendency to form imaginations arises; on
    • the other hand, imaginations remain uncovered by the organ,
    • have an organ with imaginations developing within it
    • formation of imaginations (red) cannot unfold properly in its
    • plasticity. As a result, because the imaginative activity is
    • imaginations. Only by seeing through these things from within
  • Title: Anthro Medical Therapy: Lecture VII
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    • polaric, we must imagine that especially the digestive organs
    • Imagine we were to build a sanatorium in the country. Then we
  • Title: Anthro Medical Therapy: Lecture IX
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    • comprehension of this process if you imagine that with the
    • becomes Imagination. If Imagination develops further and
    • from objective perception to Imagination, Inspiration and
    • cognitional forces in Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition
    • is true that in Imagination we come to the same forces which
    • the unconscious forces of Imagination, namely a kind of
    • permeating itself with forces of Imagination in the right
    • of Imagination, and which indicate that the plastic organ
    • summon the objectively effective Imaginations which offset
    • the creation of Imaginations, which always counteract
    • deficient objective Imagination, but one might also have to
    • consonantal eurythmy which, through this Imagination,
    • unconscious Imaginations, and the entire process is the same
  • Title: Colour: Part One: Colour-Experience (Erlebnis)
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    • by bringing a little imagination into what we have painted before us.
    • remain green. Let us try to realize the right imagination of blue
    • significant application in imagination, we must be able to experiment
    • If a man really tries to imagine himself inwardly ensouled, and thinks
    • imagine that in some way that which ensouls him flows into this form.
  • Title: Colour: Part One: The Luminous and Pictorial Nature of Colours
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    • must seek it in another way, as follows: Imagine I paint here a black,
    • and white alternately — now imagine that this black and white was
    • cannot of course paint that at the moment, but imagine these
    • But just imagine this is the case of peach-colour. It does not agree
    • other hand. Imagine a surface covered equally with blue. One can
    • imagine it, but it has something super-human. When Fra Angelico paints
    • yellow — I must make that radiate, I must imagine myself the spirit
    • differentiated it would level itself out at once. Just imagine a
    • has to be applied evenly and has to be outlined. We cannot imagine a
    • radiating green. You can imagine a twinkling star, can't you; but
    • I have therefore to imagine a white and a black, overlapping and
  • Title: Colour: Part One: The Phenomenon of Colour in Material Nature
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    • quite tolerable. If I paint a blue table — just imagine a room full
  • Title: Colour: Part Two: Thought and Will as Light and Darkness
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    • Imagination, of Inspiration and of Intuition sees not merely the head
    • form in which we see it. Through developed knowledge of Imagination,
    • in Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition; on the contrary, this
    • experience, in imagination, in connection with the thought-element of
    • Imagination and Inspiration, you put yourself opposite to it and can
    • of Imagination, of Inspiration, and of Intuition, what then happens?
  • Title: Colour: Part Two: The Connection of the Natural with the Moral-Psychical. Living in Light and Weight.
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    • that for our own consciousness light is thought, imagination; the
    • What does this mean in reference to the Cosmos? Let us imagine it in a
    • diagram. Imagine physical and etheric body, astral body and ego bound
    • all subconsciously. But it reveals itself at once to the imagination;
    • Imagination, you can observe the etheric body of a plant. In doing so
    • imaginative picture. You simply have the feeling it is heavy. And from
    • point, light goes out from it into the whole universe. One imagines
    • Newton, really things very materialistically; or he imagines some sort
    • attraction which no one can every prove except in imagination. Now
    • again to it. There are people who imagine a solar system with comets
  • Title: Colour: Part Two: Dimension, Number and Weight
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    • have no meaning for what is there, but they seemingly imagine them
    • If one investigates such a description and imagines the man as he
    • says: if the world really is as we imagine it — i.e. as he imagined
  • Title: Colour: Part Three: The Creative World of Colour
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    • imagined that one could chatter wherever one happened to be about this
    • imagine a man today going through a picture gallery or exhibition in a
    • vibrations of the ether-waves so and so much in length, etc. Imagine
    • sort of thing which a person may imagine for himself and which has no
  • Title: Colour: Part Three: Colours as Revelations of the Psychic in the World
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    • reality we cannot imagine the plant without its green, if we use our
    • living imagination. The plant creates its green out of itself. But
  • Title: Colour: Part Three: The Hierarchies and the Nature of the Rainbow
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    • And we have to imagine the consciousness-element of the Cherubim as a
    • imagination, one sees elemental beings active in it. They are revealed
    • reveals to an imaginative observer an outpouring and a disappearance
    • Now imagine we have the rainbow in section. Then these being emerge in
    • and you can imagine the watery element arises from it. Spiritual
  • Title: The Building at Dornach: Lecture I
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    • wonderfully magical light. Homer is humorous enough to show
  • Title: The Building at Dornach: Lecture II
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    • magic emanating from Sophocies' Oedipus is due to the fact
    • magic emanating from Sophocles' tragedy of Oedipus has been
  • Title: The Building at Dornach: Lecture III
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    • must be clear in our minds about this. Imagine yourselves in
  • Title: The Building at Dornach: Lecture IV
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    • Imagination.
    • realise that some Imagination, Inspiration or Intuition
    • that when we have the Imagination, the Inspiration or the
  • Title: The Building at Dornach: Lecture V
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    • would fain speak the magic word which rouses it into inner
    • whole magic of Nature to expression — perhaps the early
    • — it is also imagined that there was never any
    • imagine that there has always been evolution, that everything
    • imagine that if some person of eminence in our time had been
    • the person we have imagined sitting in the corner, listening
  • Title: Ways/Architecture: Lecture I: The Acanthus Leaf
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    • subtlest materialism imaginable. Now let me show you the
    • Imagine a kind of stage, and as an amphitheatre around it,
    • only imagine what is merely indicated in the Ionic pillars,
    • imagine that the Doric painting which grew out of the
  • Title: Ways/Architecture: Lecture II: The House of Speech
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    • purpose of putting their affairs in order, for they imagine
    • different from what physics imagines it to be. The principles
    • the old myths symbolically and allegorically, and imagine for
  • Title: Ways/Architecture: Lecture IV: True Aesthetic Laws of Form
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    • to imagine ourselves entering the building from the West, in
  • Title: Ways/Architecture: Lecture V: The Creative World of Colour
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    • imagine that animals, even higher animals, behold the world
    • understanding of these things. Man imagines that if he is
    • impulse to impress these tints through creative imagination
    • imagine, simply on account of their clothing, that they might
    • should imagine that we take this beginning to be the perfect
  • Title: Goethe As Founder of a New Science of Aesthetics: Steiner's First Lecture
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    • imaginable form. With him also the fact is established
    • rest; they seek to embody the so-called imaginative —
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture I
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    • written the lecture down, and we need but to imagine that a
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture II
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    • sense of the whole. You cannot imagine, if you think
    • to behold a picture, an imagination in every single word; and
    • attention to these things because one imagines: there in
    • say it. But imagine, if someone were to represent it as a
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture IV
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    • wind. Now, you can imagine what an effect it has inwardly, in
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture V
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    • ourselves first in imagination, in inner experience —
    • represented values. If you imagine how at that time
    • should imagine that one confronts a giant frog with an open
    • Naturally, you must now imagine that horses whistle! Now you
    • the sense of creating imagination. He who cannot occupy
  • Title: Art of Lecturing: Lecture VI
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    • Imagine in front of you, dear Christians, there stands a
    • attempting to organize in a threefold way? Imagine a country
    • nothing more beautiful could be imagined. The people who
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 1: Introduction to the Eurythmy Performance
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    • moulding it, then Imagination comes about.
    • Imagination. We can call back something that is a gift to our
    • Imagination.
    • Inspiration becomes an element belonging to Imagination.
    • through eurythmy how Intuition, Inspiration and Imagination
    • third element, Imagination.
    • Imagination through Inspiration to Intuition. In the poem
    • transformed into eurythmy you have Imagination; in the
    • ascent from Imagination to Inspiration, and to Intuition.
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 3: Rudolf Steiner's Opening Lecture and Reading of the Statutes
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    • kingly magi, who bore within them the wisdom of all the
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 4: The Laying of the Foundation Stone
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    • reigning in human love; universal Imagination reigning in the
    • us the universal Imagination, which teaches us the universal
    • in this threefold being the archetype of the Imagination
    • dodecahedral Imagination which has received its form through
    • image, its form, from universal Imagination and human
    • Imagination, and its brilliant radiance from universal
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 6: Meeting of the Vorstand and the General Secretaries
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    • well imagine, for example, that there are national Societies
    • I can also imagine that there will be others who will want to
    • procedure would not be possible. But I can well imagine that
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 8: Continuation of the Foundation Meeting, 27 December, 10 a.m.
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    • DR STEINER: Dear friends, you can imagine
    • most free manner imaginable. I said that I would take on the
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 9: Continuation of the Foundation Meeting, 28 December, 10 a.m.
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    • is impossible to imagine that in olden times the spiritual
    • really is a magician! Does anyone want to speak to Paragraph
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 11: Meeting of the Vorstand of the General Anthroposophical Society
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    • Try to imagine it! I can say that under the conditions
    • proceed by fixing budgets. Imagine a national budget being
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 12: Continuation of the Foundation Meeting, 29 December, 10 a.m.
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    • Dynamis, Exusiai. To characterize them we imagine their
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 13: Continuation of the Foundation Meeting, 30 December, 10 a.m.
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    • DR STEINER: Just imagine, after these
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 15: The Idea of the Future Building in Dornach
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    • imagine, I have recently given much thought to the idea of
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 16: Open Discussion of Swiss Delegates
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    • up. I cannot imagine that you do not also have other wishes,
    • DR STEINER: But you could imagine that a branch which is
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 19: The Rebuilding of the Goetheanum
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    • will here appear as something angular. You must imagine that
  • Title: Christmas Conference: Lecture 20: On the Right Entry into the Spiritual World: The Responsibility Incumbent on Us
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    • perhaps not as the majority would like to imagine.
    • would ordinarily imagine, you say to yourself: If only these
  • Title: Awakening to Community: Lecture I
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    • worked together in the most selfless way imaginable to bring the
    • teacher imaginable, one wholly consonant with the spirit in which the
  • Title: Awakening to Community: Lecture VI
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    • prevailed among them, fruitful, loving relationships. Now imagine
  • Title: Awakening to Community: Lecture VII
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    • entirely by his imaginings. He comes to blows with the others because
    • imaginable. For its members are meant to remain free individuals.
  • Title: Awakening to Community: Lecture VIII
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    • of their work. But on the other hand, just imagine youth coming there
    • scarcely imagine anything finer than the contributions made by the
  • Title: Awakening to Community: Lecture IX
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    • to him; they thus share a common content. But now let us imagine that
    • following. Imagine yourselves back in times when religious streams
    • Observing people nowadays, one simply cannot imagine them being
    • states of consciousness familiar to everybody, and imagine a dreaming
    • Society. It is the most natural development imaginable for when
  • Title: Awakening to Community: Lecture X
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    • rate, that it would take all one's time just to read them. Imagine
    • that exists not just in one's imagination but in reality; one can't
  • Title: Hegel, Schopenhauer, Thought, Will
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    • imagine what kind of tragedy it predicted! It could even have
    • imagine that when something in contrast to them is great,
    • humour can also be retained about it, because people imagine
    • unreasonable will as actual reason, imagination and thought.
  • Title: Excursus/Mark: II: Some Practical Points of View
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    • respect of dwelling within his will. We imagine that the will can he
  • Title: Excursus/Mark: III: Excursus: Lecture I
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    • always spoken, in a pictorial language, an imaginative language. They
  • Title: Excursus/Mark: III: Excursus: Lecture III
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    • by the Magi, the Chaldeans, he tried single-handed to murder the
    • only see what we take there through our own fanciful imaginations,
    • see reality but imaginary forms, fantastic images which are described
  • Title: Excursus/Mark: III: Excursus: Lecture IV
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    • I wish to say can only he clearly understood if you imagine
  • Title: Excursus/Mark: III: Excursus: Lecture V
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    • become aware of our ego in a very special way when those magic
    • seen that a magic activity passes from soul to soul, from spirit to
  • Title: Excursus/Mark: III: Excursus: Lecture VII
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    • clairvoyant imaginative content and given abstract forms. From this
    • you not think or imagine that Buddha has progressed?” When
  • Title: Excursus/Mark: IV: The Path of Theosophy from Former Ages until Now
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    • the illusion of Ritter Wahn if we imagine anything can prosper
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course I - Lecture I: The Eternal and the Transient in the Human Being
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    • mysteries had to go through. Our time can hardly imagine the severe
    • all magic by explaining. But we cannot be content with this view.
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course I: Lecture III: The Nature of God from the Theosophical Standpoint
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    • of divinity. If we imagine the divinity as the sun, each of us is like
    • above himself. Then his imagination creates an image of him. The gods
    • imagine it, but it lives in us as life. This is not knowledge of God,
    • an imagination of God at most. A real proof is only necessary if a matter
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course I - Lecture IV: Theosophy and Christianity
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    • Christianity came into being are nothing else than myths which the imagination
    • to understand everything that one regards as dogma as imagination floating in
    • died. We have to do it with a spiritual appearance which we have to imagine
    • not in shadowy way, as shadowy ideal, but as reality, as the theosophist imagines
    • still imagine the ideals at most which contain abstractions. Then he speaks
    • He imagines shadowy ideas. He can still rise to “simplicity” in
    • the human imagination, but to something even higher, to seizing real spirituality
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course II: Lecture I: The Epistemological Basis of Theosophy I
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    • imagined to be movable. However, Kant makes the human being with his
    • a judgment a priori. I can simply imagine a triangle and give the proof,
    • An example: Imagine that
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course II: Lecture II: The Epistemological Basis of Theosophy II
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    • is only what exists in you, and if you imagine it without this, nothing but
    • and time exist as I perceive them. The physicist imagines that a movement in
    • building stones to prove what the subjective view has put up. Imagine that we
    • have a sensation of touch. The naive human being imagines that he perceives
    • the picture on the retina. One imagines that there chemical changes of the visual
    • dreams fitted together. You can imagine already from the outside, I would like
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course II: Lecture III: The Epistemological Basis of Theosophy III
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    • our subjective world. On that is based what we have to imagine as theosophy.
    • has only an imagined being that his being stops if he does no longer think.
    • — And Frohschammer wrote about imagination as the factor
    • will. He tried to show the whole nature outdoors as a product of imagination.
    • we feel called to say that the world is our idea or imagination or anything
    • our cognitive faculties and our powers of imagination with the world.
    • Imagine the contrast of the ego
    • above them can deliver a judgment. Imagine which arguments they put forward
    • is impossible for the thinking of the adherents of Kant and Schopenhauer. Imagine
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course III - Lecture I: Theosophical Teachings of the Soul. Part I: Body and Soul
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    • at the same time. What one imagined as soul since millennia, no naturalist can
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course III - Lecture II: Theosophical Teachings of the Soul. Part II: Soul and Human Destiny
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    • the right answer to this assertion. He said: imagine once that this whole human
    • be achieved. — Then Leibniz goes on: now imagine this human brain endlessly
    • my brain senses, my brain imagines?
    • can improve his power of imagination, extend his overlooking. If now we see
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course III - Lecture III: Theosophical Teachings of the Soul. Part III: Soul and Mind
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    • state. We can get an image of this process, if we imagine that we bring a sleeping
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course IV - Lecture I: Theosophy and Spiritism
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    • which calculates, deduces, and informs us about our moral life. Imagine what
    • It is easy to imagine that these
    • forces which were effective with the construction of the organism. Imagine the
    • Imagine him being transported in that time when these forces of consciousness
    • tools, also not of the spiritual powers, because these could do everything imaginable
    • a beneficial influence on one side, on the other side a damaging effect. That
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course IV - Lecture II: Theosophy and Somnambulism
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    • something that can bring in only damaging, bad influence to the human life.
    • a kind of empty imagination and one is hardly inclined to scrutinise the strange
    • one can make easily with every somnambulist. Imagine that a somnambulist gets
    • and to make them our impressions of consciousness. Imagine this consciousness
    • However, we can imagine other states of consciousness; we can imagine that the
    • of infinite wisdom. Imagine instead that the calculating reason perceives the
    • think about that which it perceives from without, imagine instead that you would
    • as I have suggested now. I said that one may imagine that our reason, our consciousness
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course IV - Lecture III: The History of Spiritism
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    • to the highest super-sensible truth were regarded as magicians, as allies of
    • — even if they were defamed as magicians and were prosecuted — that
    • and wants to inform me about alchemy, magic and the kabala ... — This
    • its true form, convinces himself soon that this medieval thinking did not imagine
    • spiritual. Also Dante did not imagine his hell and his heaven
    • in the works of those who wrote about spiritism, demonology, magic et cetera
    • magnetism and in the book about the magic of figures, so that these books are
    • their ideas confirmed on account of the spiritistic facts. If you imagine a
    • On the Magic of Figures (Vienna, 1882).
    • Toward Imagination (Anthroposophic Press, 1990), lecture 6
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course IV - Lecture IV: The History of Hypnotism and Somnambulism
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    • calls actinobolism. This would mean approximately: the radiating imagination.
    • “This very big force of imagination appears even with the animals. The
    • chickens have such a strong imagination that they get motionless and a peculiar
    • this assertion: Miraculous experiment about the imagination
    • on the lively imagination of the animal which takes that line drawn on the soil
    • same time in a book entitled Entertainment of the Human Imagination.
    • real, but only imaginary illnesses, so that hysterical people are cured only
    • in their imagination, or that sick people were relieved of pains in their imagination.
    • substance, no matter whether it is coarse or fine. — One could imagine
    • the church attributes these phenomena to imagination, this shows only how much
    • imagination the church has. He got personal about the Catholic priest to have
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course V - Lecture I: What Does the Modern Human Being Find in Theosophy?
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    • to live stopping to breathe, sees him dying, and that he cannot imagine that
    • not imagine that it has come from the seed in which already the force was put
    • to these thoughts in the right way. We only need to imagine that infinite consequence,
    • if one does not want to imagine that a soul has originated from nothing and
    • point of view of the thoughtful reflection is: how have we to imagine the intricate
    • world views. In a very nice way an old Indian writing tells how one has to imagine
    • spirit must have its effect. Imagine the following: you have a vessel with water
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course V - Lecture II: What Do Our Scholars Know about Theosophy?
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    • I want to say. Imagine that you have a picture before yourselves which shows
    • interest you. Also what the painter has imagined does not interest you particularly.
    • try to imagine this oscillatory movement of the ether. Is this colourless? It
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course V - Lecture III: Is Theosophy Unscientific?
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    • tries to show how one could imagine that life has come into being from the lifeless.
    • the living as something lifeless. Preyer imagines approximately that the earth
    • a hint we can explain to ourselves this question if we imagine that anybody
    • one imagines it. This difference comes also up in the talks about the Basic
    • that cannot be denied by the natural sciences. It has differently imagined,
    • such imagination, such thinking and looking developed finally as it is today.
    • in itself. What is separated today as imagination, as religious devoutness,
    • is separated in many mental activities today was enclosed in a unity. Imagination
    • was not that imagination which we regard as an unreal one. Imagination was fertilised
    • what we call artistic imagination today; it was that which contained truth in
    • intimately with this imagination. The whole human being was a unity, a spiritual
    • cell. We can imagine it externally if we check what has still remained to us.
    • means of one of the mental activities, by imagination. The tremendous Greek
    • art is the conquest of the physical world with the means of imagination.
    • art by imagination spiritually, Christianity conquered the physical morality,
    • in a new art form which should be more than the art founded on pure imagination.
  • Title: Spiritual Teachings of Soul/World: Course V - Lecture IV: Is Theosophy Buddhist Propaganda?
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    • — from which it follows that a true expert imagines nirvana as non-existence:
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: The Christ Impulse in Historical Development - Lecture 1
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    • course of time than we would imagine. We all know, of course, that man
    • centuries. We can well imagine that it is impossible for a detail of
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: Rosicrucian Christianity - Lecture 1
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    • acquired these qualities but was born with them. If you imagine to
    • way to imagine them is to picture the twelve in a circle round the
    • the thirteenth had revealed to them, in imaginations — for it
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: Rosicrucian Christianity - Lecture 2
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    • spiritual world. He may at first imagine that the voice has come from
    • he expressed in certain signs, imaginative pictures and figures. It
    • was a kind of imaginative knowledge. One of the outcomes of this was
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: Jeshu ben Pandira - Lecture 2
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    • not imagine that this attentiveness is very generally and strongly
    • the world of imaginative representations, he then observes that the
    • to emanate from him such magical moral forces as enable him to impart
    • could not develop such magical words. Today only thoughts can be
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: The Christ Impulse as Living Reality - Lecture 1
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    • accept, whilst imagining they are being genuinely discriminating.
    • But do not let us imagine that this intellectuality ought to merge, as
    • imagine what it will be like as Socrates could, who considered that
    • the future, he becomes Buddha, his spoken words will contain the magic
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: The Christ Impulse as Living Reality - Lecture 2
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    • will flow into the hearts of men as a magic, moral power. In this way
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: The Dawn of Occultism in the Modern Age - Lecture 2
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    • which are disagreeable to me, and imagine that I myself actually
    • really wanted them? In other words we imagine with all intensity that
    • a real connection with this being who has been imagined into
    • become aware that this imagined being is by no means without
    • spirit forms from the higher worlds. To have an imaginative conception
    • find a better imaginative picture than the story of the stork. What
    • ourselves believe in any imaginative picture we give to the children.
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: The True Attitude To Karma
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    • within us a magic power which, without our conscious knowledge, leads
    • being within me has been drawn to them by a magic power, how I imposed
    • magic.
    • imagine that in a subsequent life we shall be led to this person by
    • ease. For it is a delusion to imagine you can discover the divine man
  • Title: Esoteric Christianity: Intimate Workings of Karma
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    • and joy are acts of grace. A man who imagines that the happiness and
    • We must never imagine that happiness is allotted to us as a mark of
    • imagine that we ourselves have willed whatever may have happened to
    • did not happen by chance, and we will deliberately imagine that we
    • In this way, therefore, we will imagine that things otherwise
    • creating a kind of being in our imagination, a very extraordinary
    • had something to do with the things thus built up in imagination.
  • Title: Novalis: On his Hymns to the Night
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    • fact show that in their imagination, ideas, feelings and
    • mathematical imagination became a great poem which filled him
    • in him rose what he called his “magical
    • which the old Magi had followed. As a result he understood the
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 1: Whitsuntide. Festival of the Liberation of the Human Spirit
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • free conscious activity what he would have attained by magical arts
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 2: The Contrast Between Cain and Abel
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • imagine you have a race of people which were originally similar to
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 3: The Mysteries of the Druids and the 'Drottes'
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • through magic. The danger is that this power can be abused. He
    • spreading, much had degenerated and there were many black magicians,
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 4: The Prometheus Saga
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • to imagine what is meant when one speaks about the technology of the
    • to imagine the three races of the gods, Uranus, Chronos and Zeus, as
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 5: The Mystery Known to Rosicrucians
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • art. He was the most significant architect we can imagine.
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 6: Manicheism
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • imagine the interworking of good and evil? We have to explain it as
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 7: The Essence and Task of Freemasonry from the Point of View of Spiritual Science - 1
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • light. Then Tubal-Cain gave Hiram his hammer which had the magical
    • Just imagine someone has
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 8: The Essence and Task of Freemasonry from the Point of View of Spiritual Science - 2
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 9: The Essence and Task of Freemasonry from the Point of View of Spiritual Science - 3
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • however, who imagined that no death, in the conventional sense of the
    • the matter. So, whoever imagined that an adept could not be hit and
    • discoveries. People will imagine that medical science was the
    • tendency, you should not imagine that this now has significance for
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 10: Evolution and Involution as they are Interpreted by Occult Societies [The Atom as Congealed Electricity]
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • The others will make use of every [imaginable] skill and subtlety in
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 11: Concerning the Lost Temple and How It Is To Be Restored - 1
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • physical body is really the most perfect thing imaginable. An
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 12: Concerning the Lost Temple and How It Is To Be Restored - 2
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 13: Concerning the Lost Temple and How It Is To Be Restored - 3
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • trinity, Atma, Buddhi and Manas. You must imagine, therefore, that
    • which we can imagine as a great ocean. Now Plato said about this,
    • line formed by plant and man, to make a cross. Imagine to yourselves
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 14: Concerning the Lost Temple and How It Is To Be Restored - 4
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 15: Atoms and the Logos in the Light of Occultism
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • imagine it to be possible to make an atom grow continually bigger and
    • mysteries which come from the great Magi of the world.
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 16: The Relationship of Occultism to the Theosophical Movement
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • Every initiate knew it. Now imagine it densified, translated down
    • super-sensible, not merely by means of imaginative concepts. Such a
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 17: Freemasonry and Human Evolution I
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 18: Freemasonry and Human Evolution II
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 19: The Relationship Between Occult Knowledge and Everyday Life
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
  • Title: Temple Legend: Lecture 20: The Royal Art in a New Form
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    • imaginative thinking. Though compiled from incomplete notes, these deeply
    • finds a shadowy expression in the imagination. What can [now] be read
    • imagine today. But all these different names are no longer relevant
    • coarsest way imaginable. It is a symbol taken from sexual life. It is
  • Title: Problem of Death: Lecture I
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    • with all the magic she had possessed in the days of her
  • Title: Problem of Death: Lecture II
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    • kind are indicated in nearly all imaginative writings. Such
    • Imagination, how this karma lives itself out. This can be
  • Title: Problem of Death: Lecture III
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    • imagined. It is a tendency in human nature which may very
    • imagine, using it in every situation of life. To understand
    • into the most utter confusion. It is difficult to imagine
    • but just imagine a sculptor in the midst of this shocked
    • we need only call up the Imagination, the real imagination
    • not imagined hindrances — how stubbornly the
  • Title: The Bridge between Morality and Nature
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    • as if it is somehow present there. People imagine that somehow
    • that human beings are to be imagined as bodily physical beings
  • Title: Spiritual Science, History, Reincarnation, Culture, Examples
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    • imaginations which should solve the question of the
    • imagine spiritual science as penetrating our lives and take
    • the first Christian decades, in the manner we imagine the
    • this with a comparison. Imagine we have a very ingenious
    • imagined by many. This social question can basically not be
  • Title: Opponents to Anthroposophy
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    • even if one can't imagine it, what “great crowds”
    • magical wonders, dressing them in conceptual clothing and
    • Now, just imagine such “indescribable gestures” and
  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 1 (Summary): Effects of Modern Agnosticism
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 2 (Summary): Perception and Thinking
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
    • view one is led to quite imaginary conceptions, such as that of the
  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 3 (Summary): The Tragedy of F. Nietzsche
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 4 (Summary): The Relationship between Goethe and Hegel
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
    • ‘imaginative thinking,’ and this he applied to animals.
  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 5: From Sense Perception to Spirit Imaging
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
    • From Sense Perception to Spirit Imaging
    • works as Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition.
    • When the term Imagination
    • imaginative perception.
    • by giving you a brief picture of the imaginative perception that can
    • This imaginative perception
    • a recalled memory, for this will also be the way in which Imaginations
    • a person may have had years ago. Imaginations on the other hand, if
    • they are genuine cognitive Imaginations called up in the soul, will
    • the more external aspect of imaginative perceptions from a positive
    • these imaginative perceptions are not. They are not a kind of vision,
    • in when subject to visions, hallucinations and the like. Imaginative
    • any form of cognitive Imagination, not to tune down the relationship
    • if cognitive Imagination is to be achieved, of doing specific exercises.
    • progresses to cognitive Imagination, for now experience can be managed
    • stage in the experience of cognitive Imagination. The I, the ego, is
    • when imaginative perception is to be the capacity used, one does in
    • concepts but as something we may call Imagination, because it takes
    • of imaginative perception. When this imaginative perception first occurs
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 6: From Imaginative Knowledge to Inspirational Knowledge
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
    • From Imaginative Knowledge to
    • that imaginative perception shows some similarity to the way memory
    • works in the human mind. One way of defining imaginative perception
    • is right. It is of course exactly what the lazy thinker wants: to imagine
    • outline — and return to our discussion of imaginative perception.
    • I have described how imaginative
    • When imaginative perception
    • not like to dwell on it for long. Yet to imaginative perception it becomes
    • Imagination consists in receiving pictures — bears the mark of processes
    • to do with life coming to an end, with dying. Imaginative perception
    • from ordinary sensory perception to imaginative perception of the thinking
    • comes more alive when approaching Imagination and Inspiration, than
    • we advance to imaginative perception. Here, the processes of gaining
    • in mind and spirit, in an Imagination. The same process becomes a material
    • the process of Imagination to thinking, as I have just described. It
    • can be said that imaginative perception offers the possibility of seeing
    • in this way, we shall indeed come to realize that Imagination itself
    • for our personal experiences. The process of Imagination moves away
    • mind. A spirit and soul element is active in Imagination. There is an
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 7: The Gulf Between a Causal Explanation of Nature and the Moral World Order
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
    • things to Imagination, Inspiration and finally Intuition. This most
    • of Anthroposophy by progressing through Imagination and Inspiration
    • spiritual science takes through Imagination and Inspiration. I have
    • times before. Those exercises to achieve imaginative perception will
    • Imagination in this way we prepare ourselves for insight into a genuinely
    • removing such Imaginations from the consciousness we have now achieved.
    • We need to practise no longer to have the Imaginations, for they are
    • Imaginations previously have been subjective, objective Imaginations
    • Imaginations, Imaginations not arising out of us but out of spiritual
    • those Imaginations. In the sphere of our sensory perception, we can
    • In the same way, the Imaginations achieved at this point reveal to us
    • of Imaginations, but by going yet one step farther. When we attain to
    • the imaginative world, the first thing to show itself is our own life,
    • efforts beyond the point where we get rid of Imaginations containing
    • details from within the horizon of the Imaginative world. We may forget
    • the Imagination of our whole being as a human person, that is, discard,
    • present stage, that is, to shut out its imaginative content, we come
    • to Intuition, and Imagination, we perceive in soul and spirit the real
    • a world, as it were. Anything we achieve through Imagination, Intuition
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  • Title: Fruits/Anthroposophy: Lecture 8: The Social Question
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    • to the anthroposophical path of knowledge. Imagination is described as a
    • The imaginative, inspired and intuitive perception
    • of achieving Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition as such. These are
    • in our Imaginations. Thinking will then be able to reach the world which
    • that the spiritual scientist has to take everything he sees in imaginative
    • When the results of Imagination
    • to Imagination, taking hold of something objective and coming to expression
    • and astir, and this is given in imaginative perception.
    • through Imagination. On the one hand. Imagination is able — if I
    • Well, this man seems to imagine an illustrated special edition of the
  • Title: Natural Science; the Anthroposophical Movement
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    • containing spiritual imaginations, as I mentioned about natural
    • of spirituality lived within the imagination about nature it at
    • imaginative ideas, is regarded as transitory. In order to
    • sensory and penetrate it with spiritual imagination which
  • Title: Et Incarnatus Est
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    • stars. The magi who brought the gifts of gold, frankincense,
    • magi felt compelled to lay at the feet of the Holy Child the
    • Jesus, or to imagine a life and personality such as is
    • not have achieved such good results without the magic of an
    • evolution? What did the magi from the East desire when they
    • constellations were formerly understood. This was what the magi
    • Christmas, the magi studied the heavens when they wished to
    • willing to tread again the path of the magi to the manger. He
    • as the magi surrendered their faith in the authority of the
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture I: Where and How Does One Find the Spirit?
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    • imagine a water container in which the water is cooled bit by
    • ice swimming in it. We imagine now that any being cannot
    • imagine that we see an event before ourselves, which makes us
    • Many a prejudice has its origin in the habit to imagine the
    • conclusion. Imagine, you have a seal and sealing wax. The name
    • us go back once again! Imagine how a faint originates from
    • the physical world, then imagination which, however, has
    • form the third level. One attains the imaginative level doing
    • chastity and purity. Imagine the red rose; you face the chaste
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture II: Goethe's Secret Revelation - Exoteric
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    • without imagining those features that are of importance if we
    • the snake forms a magic circle. The young man and the canary
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture III: Goethe's Secret Revelation - Esoteric
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    • that a poet created in the free play of imagination. We have
    • one wants to say so of a work of imagination is discounted with
    • poetic work is a work of a comprising imagination penetrating
    • Goethean imagination, to show the figures and the
    • the application of the human intellect and power of imagination
    • imagination is allowed to interfere in that which is science,
    • which the power of imagination could attain impersonally.
    • to consider the human being only in relation to his imaginative
    • of imagination limited to observation can deliver objective
    • imaginative power, only by the intellectual faculty. This is
    • imagination, feeling and willing — in the development of
    • the present average human being the imaginative faculty, the
    • developed concerning the imaginative and reasoning faculties,
    • thinking and imaginative power the purification of the human
    • solely, insofar it cannot speak to the mere imaginative power.
    • objectivity as the thinking or the powers of imagination can
    • imagination in such a way that the being of the things is
    • imagination. However, what I have recognised is only a part of
    • the powers of imagination it becomes clear gradually that there
    • are things that are deeper than the powers of imagination,
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  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture IV: Bible and Wisdom I
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    • has meant something not only to the imagination, and means
    • imaginative consciousness by the development of the internal
    • Imagine the primeval development of the human being when a
    • able to say to himself — if he finds his own imaginations
    • apply that seriously, it is weird. We want to try it. Imagine
    • New Testaments. You see what the human soul imagines shown in
    • imaginations. These are the facts that are described in the
    • Bible critics have fought against their own imaginary creation,
    • against their own imaginary relation, against that which they
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture V: Bible and Wisdom II
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    • in pictures, in imaginations. Yes, you can express the
    • Imagine what the initiate experienced in the old times. Only
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture VI: Superstition from the Standpoint of Spiritual Science
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    • Superstition and Magic
    • sometimes, however, also as an unlucky number with which magic
    • imagines it, there the atoms are dancing and whirling.
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture VII: Issues of Nutrition in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • is the actor, the creator. We can imagine just as a clock or a
    • external luminous light. Imagine once the sunlight becoming
    • this thought is not quite correct. Imagine once the following:
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture VIII: Issues of Health in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • remedy, which the organism shows by the symptoms. One imagines
    • speak, a concrete example best of all. Imagine a human being
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture IX: Tolstoy and Carnegie
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    • indication. Another example is that the boy imagines that the
    • we find the centre in it, which we may imagine possibly in the
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture X: The Practical Development of Thinking
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    • not imagine that the post-office building has to comply with
    • simple thought. I said, “Imagine, you stand in a railroad
    • Interest in the environment, this is the magic word for the
    • practice of thinking. Imagine that a person would have formed
    • things is again such a magic ideal of the practice of thinking.
    • Imagine once that a person brings himself to use the following
    • intellectual imagination, then I can investigate whether the
    • most human beings can imagine nothing at all if one says this.
    • answers. One has to imagine them all carefully, of course, only
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XI: The Invisible Human Members and Practical Life
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    • want to imagine the invisible members of the human nature.
    • — should imagine the senses of shame and anxiety
    • nevertheless, one cannot imagine that these things form a
    • cetera flashes in the human being. — Imagine this
    • themselves. Any momentary imagining, judging and feeling
    • lacks the means to stir it up again. Imagine children who
    • sort of gymnastics is imaginable that works so harmoniously on
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XII: The Secret of the Human Temperaments
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    • could imagine! The world without temperaments, not only in the
    • such a child. Love is the magic word. We must see what is
    • the magic words, with the melancholy child that matters that
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XIII: The Riddles in Goethe's Faust - Exoteric
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    • magic, theosophy and so on, was such that, indeed, behind the
    • time, we have to imagine Goethe as a human being with
    • that the science which one had as mysticism, magic, theosophy
    • time theosophy, magic, occultism approached fraud and
    • the people was ill reputed as magic. Therefore, Tritheim von
    • regarded as black magicians and swindlers, as people who had
    • magic and similar. Because the figure of Faust is understood
    • competent in the literature of magic, which Goethe also knew at
    • Goethe's soul the magic word emerges by which certain
    • that which can be imagined and how it must be imagined as Homer
    • natural principles. All arbitrary, imaginary disappears: there
    • human beings from the first steps up to imaginative view where
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XIV: Riddles in Goethe's Faust - Esoteric
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    • all, where from this can come if we imagine what one sometimes
    • Imagine once for a moment that all objects, which are around
    • first. Imagine how in the mountains the crystals form from
    • extremely peculiar again. Imagine the entry into the
    • imaginative world. When Goethe showed this, he did not depend
    • imaginative picture from the spiritual world, he collapses with
    • astral body. One must not imagine this scene in the sensuous
    • sphere, but in such a way that the whole scene must be imagined
    • such supersensible matters which can hardly be imagined —
    • and magic actions with the spiritual world. What can be
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XV: Nietzsche in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • Imagine a human being, a man who has dealt with the question
    • easily movable mental force and imagination, the ability to
    • imagine which forms all that has accepted in the course of the
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XVI: Isis and Madonna
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    • imagined this purified soul connected with the true origin of
    • to imagine the sensuous figure, the physical nature of the
    • I have also used this picture repeatedly. We imagine a mass of
    • to imagine the picture of the Sistine Madonna, the marvellous
    • sensuous-physical one, while we imagine this Osiris Isis
    • imagines that what faces us as a sensuous mother today is the
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XVII: Old European Clairvoyance
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    • imagine the dream consciousness in such a way that something
    • old picture consciousness. Imagine an example: someone dreams
    • Imagine a human being swimming under the surface of the sea,
    • sees the star-spangled heaven. We can imagine the object
    • Imagine a human being who has seen everything above submerges
    • Imagine a human being submerging in that world in a time in
    • we say, in ten years. Now you can imagine that he brings down
  • Title: Where/How/Spirit: Lecture XVIII: The European Mysteries and Their Initiates
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    • try to imagine what has been done in the initiation schools or
    • sensuous-material is the magic dress of the spiritual. The
    • magic dress of the material. The spiritual finds its
  • Title: Eurythmy as Visible Singing: Lecture 1: The Experience of Major and Minor
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    • it by imagining that, as a human being, you could not receive much benefit
    • Imagine the following:
  • Title: Eurythmy as Visible Singing: Lecture 2: Experience and Gesture; the Intervals
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    • warmth. Let us suppose that someone is singing or speaking. Imagine
    • here. The imagination (Vorstellung) is merely pushed into the feeling.
  • Title: Eurythmy as Visible Singing: Lecture 3: Melodic Movement; the Ensouling of the Three Dimensions through Pitch, Rhythm and Beat
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    • imagined in succession. They can, however, also be imagined simultaneously;
    • possible for you to imagine that by your going out, the seventh brings
    • after imagining the keynote. Then you will find yourself in the eurythmy
  • Title: Eurthmy as Visible Singing: Lecture 5: Choral Eurythmy
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    • Now try to imagine how this would look. The frequent recurrence of the
  • Title: Eurythmy as Visible Singing: Lecture 6: The Sustained Note; the Rest; Discords
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    • towards a distorted phonetic imagination may be quite valuable. With
    • only suggest the bounds to you [the onlooker]; your imagination must
    • thing as drawing! It is damaging when children are taught to draw, for
    • a actually tend towards a distortion of phonetic imagination, they are
    • be given their place in declamation and recitation. Imagine the phrase:
    • explained in connection with the triad). Now imagine that you have to
  • Title: Eurythmy as Visible Singing: Lecture 7: Musical Physiology; the Point of Departure; Intervals; Cadences
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    • part of the arm, this is not possible. I have to imagine it as coming
    • towards me, from below upwards. I have to imagine to myself as though
    • [of the three]. The eurythmic movements of an animal, if you could imagine
    • Just imagine one of you
    • imagines that this is possible has not yet grasped what eurythmy is.
    • mentioning something in this connection. Imagine that one person is
    • a close in the music itself (where you cannot imagine continuing), then
  • Title: Eurythmy as Visible Singing: Lecture 8: Pitch (ethos and pathos), Note Values, Dynamics, Changes of Tempo
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    • terrible amount there is to do!’ But bring imagination to your aid and
  • Title: Preparing for a New Birth
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    • would be fooling ourselves if we imagined that thoughts are not
    • imagine that our feeling and will are as bound up with our
    • like an imaginary lemonade. But it need not remain so, for it
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 1: Probability and Chance
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    • out of a magic package the surprises some kindly merchant has concealed
    • by chance is like becoming a child again and taking out of a magic package
    • or less like this: Let's imagine that we have a container of type and
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 2: Consciousness in Sleeping and Waking States
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    • been describing. The area imaginatively perceived is seen as though
    • from a total absence of any imagination in clothing ourselves. No idealism
    • is involved, but rather a lack of any imagination where beauty is concerned.
    • to another kind of consciousness. Let us imagine a person who lacks
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 3: Necessity and Chance in Historical Events
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    • Wherefore, from Magic I seek assistance,
    • Now let us imagine a personality like Faust's
    • the past hour. Just imagine transferring into the mind of Faust the
    • of discovering any element of necessity. But now let's imagine just
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 4: Necessity as Past Subjectivity
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    • thus far is subjective. But now let us imagine time passing and the
    • Imagine yourselves transposed from earthly
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 5: Necessity and Past, Chance and Present
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    • brook starting to run down from the heights. Let's imagine that something
    • fact. But now let us imagine that somebody decided to regulate the course
    • If we now imagine ourselves looking at the
    • well imagine that everything in it is as it is whether or not it is
    • Now imagine yourselves walking through a
    • necessity. But though it is hard to imagine it, there could then be
    • He does an incredible amount of rummaging around in words. Nowhere does
    • us imagine some people or other with its characteristic views. Mauthner
    • of a force, just as it does in the case of imagining other such
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 6: Imaginative Cognition Leaves Insights of Natural Science Behind
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    • Imaginative Cognition Leaves Insights of Natural Science Behind
    • Imaginative Cognition Leaves
    • called imagination. But if imagination is to have any relationship to
    • body to attain genuine imaginative knowledge. We must have progressed
    • the etheric body when we seek imaginations; we have to make use of our
    • etheric bodies to obtain really objective imaginative experience, exactly
    • physical plane by those who leave it to ascend into the imaginative
    • behind there were just dreamed up. In the imaginative world into which
    • as we enter the imaginative world. Once, in Munich, I used a drastic
    • upon the physical world and doesn't enter the imaginative world; they
    • process. As we ascend into the first spiritual world, the imaginative
    • And now we have to realize that the imaginative
    • metamorphoses, resembling the rippling, flowing element. The imaginative
    • though the thoughts we produce, thoughts endowed with imagination, were
    • This experiencing of the imaginative world
    • now; there, it was a dream-world of imagination, a realm of pictures.
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 7: The Physical Body Binds Us to the Physical World
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    • with the world; imaginative perception takes the place of the mental
    • understanding. Just imagine, for example, a person being born with a
  • Title: Chance/Necessity/Providence: Lecture 8: Death, Physical Body and Etheric Body
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    • body. It would be impossible to imagine anything as magnificently built
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture I: The Spiritual World and Spiritual Science
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    • One normally imagines if one assumes that
    • depend on that: I imagine light
    • expresses itself, otherwise, in our thinking and imagining, and
    • everyday imagination? —
    • the real, not imagined Imagination what it means: the
    • feel thinking and imagining attracted by the spiritual world
    • to return to the usual imagination and to think as you just
    • imagination can invent; as a rule the real life is completely
    • different from the fantastic picture which one imagines about a
    • Hence, you have to imagine that you
    • If we imagine the spiritual life this way,
    • put as science what he can observe. Since you can imagine that
    • world, one can imagine this reversal easily; but also that life
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture II: Theosophy and Antisophy
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    • the human soul when it is thinking and imagining, given away to
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture III: Spiritual Science and Denomination
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    • dear to him, and he could not imagine that their innermost
    • whole soul contents which the soul attains an Imaginative
    • world. It is an Imaginative world not because this world is
    • mere imagination, but because that what the soul experiences in
    • the spiritual world; for this imagery, this Imaginative world
    • complete erasing of the Imaginative world takes place. Since
    • letter case and forms words, the imaginations are confused as
    • Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition in the spiritual world.
    • spiritual science originates, how can one imagine its relation
    • imagines also if he puts it on his face as a real piece of iron
    • the right one that one must imagine the human being as a
    • The imaginative world of art compared to the Imaginative world
    • like a silhouette. However, the Imaginative world of the
    • imaginative world of art is that what withdraws from the
    • such a way, as if in art the imaginative life appears like in a
    • silhouette. The imaginative life is much more saturated with
    • what he imagines like in art, impregnates it with that what he
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture IV: On Death
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    • with numerous persons of the present: the timidity to imagine
    • spiritual world. Indeed, some people imagine that one attains
    • imagining thinking and the will. We must accompany the everyday
    • asleep very soon if it has nothing to imagine from the outside.
    • thinking, imagining, feeling and perceiving, from walking, from
    • experiences arise. I have to describe the Imaginative view in
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture V: The Meaning of Immortality of the Human Soul
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    • repeatedly on earth. If one imagines that the soul which lives
    • imagine the complete historical development of humanity and of
    • school paralysed and weakened it?” Lessing imagines
    • abstractions, are nothing real. For Lessing imagines that the
    • Let us imagine the experience of the
    • something and that thereby imaginary or real descents are
    • to imagine a lion. We carry them through the gate of death. We
    • imaginary.
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture VI: The Evil
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    • submerges, the stoic imagined, into a realm that is not his
    • compared to that what one can imagine today with a thinking
    • phenomena one can have, one could very well imagine a world
    • awakening what Jacob Boehme includes in his imagination. When
    • strengthening of the soul life. This is the only imaginary
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture VII: The Moral Basis of Human Life
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    • have called the first level that of the Imaginative world. This
    • Imaginative world is no imagined world, but a world in which
    • have to work through this Imaginative world, so that you get to
    • from Imagination that with the latter you have the outer
    • Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition into the spiritual
    • is only a memory of it; something that one can imagine at most.
    • activity, the imagining activity, and the feeling activity is
    • the Imaginative world. What about the moral ideas if we ascend
    • the Imaginative world in such a way that you must say to
    • the Imaginative world? We find everything familiar that
    • the essentials, as soon as one enters into the Imaginative
    • appears in the Imaginative world in such a way, that it instils
    • which you behold Imaginatively, in such a way that you are
    • and the like, appears in the Imaginative world in such a
    • beholds it in the Imaginative world. However, it works as dark
    • Imaginative world. You must dive into the Inspirative
    • experience in the Imaginative world, however, its centre is in
    • extinguish itself in the Imaginative world. There you
    • what appears already in the Imaginative world exists that you
    • through two worlds down, through the Imaginative world, down to
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  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture VIII: Voltaire
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    • Only with the help of spiritual science, we can imagine the
    • today. The human being had a pictorial imagination in ancient
    • imagination existed in primeval times which went over to the
    • Greek-Latin imagination only gradually, and that the human soul
    • pictorial imagination that was felt ensouled. This took place
    • The Greek-Roman imagination lasting until
    • quite different feeling and imagination of those times with the
    • there in the aurora of modern times and imagining the power of
    • still allowed him to imagine the soul in the work of nature.
    • more and more impossible to imagine the soul within nature.
    • imagines the own soul as a monad. Although he imagines the
    • imagines it as ensouled by monads.
    • 1710) also imagines the soul as a monad, and he
    • imagines it in such a way that it can suitably relate to the
    • not look exactly at it. I have to imagine the view of nature,
    • it. He was able to do this only if he imagined it as a monad
    • temple of love as he presents it as a kind of magic service
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture IX: Between Death and Rebirth of the Human Being
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    • with whom one had a connection in life. You have to imagine the
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture X: Homunculus
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    • how Faust is snatched away from the usual imagination. Faust
    • would originate, or what some modern scientists imagine as the
    • Faust is dreaming. Why? Because Goethe imagines him in the
    • imagine fantastically could get to natural existence?! Proteus
    • human being is not in reality he can be it in his imagination.
    • take into consideration, and that he can imagine: I am only a
    • imagine what would result from you if you believed to originate
    • who is invented exactly after the picture as they imagine him.
    • views if one imagines the human being consisting of wholly
  • Title: Spiritual Science/Treasure for Life: Lecture XI: Spiritual Science as a Treasure for Life
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    • the levels of Imaginative, Inspirative, and Intuitive knowledge
    • and imagining that are quite different from the usual ones, one
  • Title: Child's Changing Consciousness: Lecture I
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    • cane.” One might easily imagine — especially here
    • different from what most people imagine it to be, for it
    • imagines: three lines at right angles to one another hovering
  • Title: Child's Changing Consciousness: Lecture III
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    • Don't imagine for a moment that with these words I am
    • imaginatively, you will tire your pupils. But if, out of an
  • Title: Child's Changing Consciousness: Lecture IV
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    • to a doll, through imagination and imitation within the soul.
    • most damaging effects, just during the age of seven to nine,
    • But what is it that makes this so? Imagine that you know a
    • Now imagine that another picture falls into your hands, and
    • imagines the table to be a living thing. It would never occur
    • qualities. Imagine contemporary philosophers pondering the
  • Title: Child's Changing Consciousness: Lecture V
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    • lessons. As long as we present it imaginatively we can speak
    • and imaginatively; and the more one can do this, the better one
    • plant world in its many forms with true imagination is very
    • older person's life. Imagine that you were, let's say, fifty
    • are all still “adult children.” If we imagine the
    • imaginative approach in every subject, certainly until the
    • puts something into motion that can become very damaging in
    • even more than they had previously imagined. The proper
    • religious and imaginative way, one might choose the following
  • Title: Child's Changing Consciousness: Lecture VII
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    • As you can probably imagine, it is not easy for one who
  • Title: Child's Changing Consciousness: Lecture VIII:
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    • then we shouldn't be surprised when this has a very damaging
    • Let's imagine someone who says, “I want to think only
    • have an effect, often in very unexpected places. Imagine you
  • Title: Child's Changing Consciousness: Introduction to a Eurythmy Performance
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    • being. What a poet tries to accomplish through imagination,
    • speech have to be seen in the imaginative formation of the
  • Title: Colour and the Human Races: Lecture I: The Nature of Color
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    • complete human being and has nerves and blood. Imagine that
    • when you imagine the half-lighted world in the morning and
    • Now I will say something different. Imagine
    • Do not imagine that that is not known! For
    • colors. Imagine that I take a sunflower: that is quite yellow,
    • explain that properly today, one could imagine this or
  • Title: Colour and the Human Races: Lecture II: Color and the Human Races
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    • of the Spirit and imagines it as cloud-phenomena, would prefer
  • Title: Development of the child up to puberty
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    • less outlined imaginations but these indistinct representations
    • sight attains the power of imagination, when each image
    • imagination we have clarified regarding observation of
    • a certain degree through imagination. Through simply
    • experiencing our imagination we can see what is forming in the
    • acquires simply through the imaginative experience that which
    • imaginative knowledge. Under these interesting conditions which
    • Imagination and developed Inspiration somewhat, we may evaluate
    • really penetrate these things with imaginative knowledge and
    • clearly with imaginative and inspired knowledge, but it does
    • merge, draws by necessity the imagination of the death of
    • Imagination, Inspiration and Intuition and brings sharply into
  • Title: Question/Economic Life: Lecture: The Central Question of Economic Life
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    • same words and that without a doubt both imagine that the
    • proletarian and he imagines in his fatalistic economic view
    • forces miserably fail and bring unimaginable disaster to
    • say how one imagines that these things should be handled. That
  • Title: Cosmic Prehistory: Lecture I: The Threefoldness of Space and the Unity of Time
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    • earth, the below is above and the above underneath. One can imagine
    • always passed on the impulse of creation to others. Time was so imagined
  • Title: Cosmic Prehistory: Lecture II: Lucifer and Ahriman
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    • we carry through the portal of death. And do not imagine that you don't
    • One can imagine that it
  • Title: Cosmic Prehistory: Lecture III: Romanism and Freemasonry
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    • therefore imagine the following. If you are completely immersed in concepts
    • receive spiritual knowledge. Please do not imagine that the initiates of
  • Title: Spiritual/Physical: Lecture I:
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    • selfish fear, the imaginations arising from these pictures in the soul
    • injurious forces to enter the human body. Imaginations of fear are
    • fearful imaginations but with the effects produced by loving help, this
    • imagine that some sort of climatic change were to corrupt the whole
    • imaginations, as it were lifting them up out of a sick body gradually
    • imaginations. That person then passed through the gates of death, and
    • his imaginations are beginning to shine out in wondrous beauty so that
    • this world of Cosmic imaginations which really consumed the body by the
    • imaginations which radiate toward the exploring spiritual investigator,
  • Title: Spiritual/Physical: Lecture II:
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    • their earliest years to imagine the sun with the earth revolving around
    • it, also the planets, just as one forms an imagination, if one has in
    • right conclusion and imagines: ‘The dead are helping me, by
  • Title: Christ/Human Soul: Lecture III:
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    • Karma in a certain way. But let us imagine that all guilt had remained
    • free.’ But where has Christ ever said that when people imagine
  • Title: Christ/Human Soul: Lecture IV:
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    • as such, on the contrary it imagines itself to be very enlightened; it
  • Title: How Can Mankind Find Christ Again?: Lecture 1: The Birth of Christ in the Human Soul
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    • And they gradually formed the powerful imagination of Christ dying on
    • The Christmas imagination
  • Title: How Can Mankind Find Christ Again?: Lecture 3: Brotherliness and Freedom ...
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    • Such imaginations, quite self-explanatory, were numerous and extensive
    • imagine the condition of the souls living in civilized Europe during
    • imaginative pictures describing a world of which, as I have said, people
    • only say, “Well, of course, the ancient Orientals had lively imaginations;
    • such a person has not the slightest idea how little imagination a primitive
    • that Plato too had imagined. In reality, Plato still knew with certainty
    • the Greek thinking was the result of pondering over imaginations that
    • had been experienced before birth. Of the imaginations themselves little
    • which imaginations had been formed. The waning of this thinking power
    • the ancients as imaginative wisdom and then was active in the Gnosis,
    • of Hellenism. The Greeks still had the ideas but no longer the imaginations.
  • Title: How Can Mankind Find Christ Again?: Lecture 4: Contrasting Principles of Ancient and Modern Initiation
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    • imagined the astral body as quite spatial — of course, very tenuous,
    • for anyone in our time to imagine that at a certain point on the path
    • that he reaches; it is imaginative insight into those forms. And then
  • Title: How Can Mankind Find Christ Again?: Lecture 5: The Change in the Human Soul Constitution
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    • themselves, to begin with, in imaginations that arose in man involuntarily.
    • That was their initial mode of revelation; then out of the imaginations
    • grew the conceptions of all the ancient religions. You know that imagination
    • in the ancient sense started from imaginations; they had to find their
    • For the Spirits of Personality do not give imaginations to whoever wants
    • the Spirits of Form gave him their imaginations in the form of visions.
    • in the nature of visions, everything that depends upon involuntary imaginations,
    • imaginations in full consciousness. For the Spirits of Personality will
    • not give him imaginations; he must bring the imaginations to them. And
    • imaginations, then you meet the Spirits of Personality on your supersensible
    • path of knowledge, and you find the power to verify your imaginations,
    • for the spiritual researcher today will usually be to seek imaginations
    • all sorts of stuff into arbitrary imaginations. The images one makes
    • for one unless one brings a language to them. They keep the imaginations
    • for themselves. Earlier, the Spirits of Form placed imaginations before
    • put it into concepts if one has first acquired the ability to form imaginations,
    • them we may reach not antiquated visions, but imaginations built up
  • Title: How Can Mankind Find Christ Again?: Lecture 6: Transformation of the Human Being in the Course of Evolution
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    • affected the whole composition and imaginative form of Dante's great
  • Title: How Can Mankind Find Christ Again?: Lecture 7: Experiences of the Old Year and Outlook over the New Year (part 1)
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    • as falsely as the man in the train who imagines the landscape is rushing
    • the notes. But imagine you were organized in such a way (this is of
    • — imagine that you could perceive each separate vibration in the
  • Title: How Can Mankind Find Christ Again?: Lecture 8: Experiences of the Old Year and Outlook over the New Year (part 2)
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    • hand by their love of an imagined world, and on the other hand by the
    • fact that this imagined world yields only pictures. Moreover, the souls
    • We should not simply imagine
    • They love to imagine this because sleeping is, after all, very comfortable.
    • ten beans; to imagine twenty at one glance is already difficult; but
  • Title: Community Life: Address 1: The Goesch-Sprengel Situation - Part 1
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    • will eventually fall prey to black magic as a result of the constant
    • any magical influence on the students' subconscious that the latter
    • human destinies is all too justified. I can also not imagine how an
    • that I am exerting an undue influence over you by means of black magic
    • in someone else's inner being by means of black magic.
  • Title: Community Life: Address 2: The Goesch-Sprengel Situation - Part 2
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    • instance, in this letter it is suggested that it is impossible to imagine
    • the public. Just imagine what could happen, and what a windfall it would
    • imagine, although I wouldn't go so far as to endorse the point of view
    • to another must necessarily make use of black magic. That is not what
    • and does not necessarily imply any talent for black magic.
    • as techniques of black magic, and on the other hand I am blamed for
    • are not usually taken to such an extreme that people imagine themselves
    • Let's imagine people coming
    • as you can imagine, if someone who has not put anywhere near that kind
    • too lightly to imagine that I can possibly do both.
    • Please do not imagine that
    • pronouncements we might have come up with, although we never imagined
    • same to those around them. It would be inconsistent to imagine that
  • Title: Community Life: Lecture 1: Requirements of Our Life together in the Anthroposophical Society
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    • any figments of the imagination in its organization, but is constructed
    • imagined that they have been chosen to give birth to the Christ and
    • selling the thing and imagining himself to be infinitely superior to
    • you're talking to, and imagine what it feels like!
    • imagine except a society of fools who all subordinate themselves to
    • even pretend that it does not occur. And just imagine what it means
  • Title: Community Life: Lecture 2: The Anthroposophical Society as a Living Being
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    • is because many people imagine that this kind of exaggerated seriousness
    • it is something that could be extremely damaging to the Society. We
    • was one more proof that magic is at work—when I shake hands with
  • Title: Community Life: Lecture 3: Swedenborg: An Example of Difficulties in Entering the Spiritual World
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    • are more than a few people who imagine that being at a gathering of
    • describes the world of Imagination very aptly, but he is in no position
    • the form of Imaginations derived from the physical world. In other words,
    • in Imaginations contaminated with habits retained from experience on
    • mortals. With this in mind, we might imagine that the gods' referring
  • Title: Community Life: Lecture 4: Methods and Rational of Freudian Psychoanalysis
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    • process. In other words, we are to imagine in the soul's subconscious
    • involved in fear of physical contact, you can well imagine how it would
    • father becomes their enemy and works on as such in their troubled imagination.
  • Title: Community Life: Lecture 5: Sexuality and Modern Clairvoyance, Freudian Psychoanalysis and Swedenborg as a Seer
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    • might come up with all kinds of profound ideas about magical influences
    • observe everything himself. He observed his Imaginations. He himself
    • perceives spiritual objects presented to him in the form of Imaginations
    • imagine, then, how many people are reading this work of pure thought
    • case, repressed sexuality filled his Imaginations that would otherwise
    • Imaginations. Swedenborg, then, is a good example of what to avoid in
  • Title: Community Life: Lecture 6: The Concept of Love as it Relates to Mysticism
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    • power of imitation or fashion and captured the imagination of readers
    • Cousin meant when he said that we love the infinite and imagine we
  • Title: Community Life: Lecture 7: The Philosophy of Psychoanalysis as Illuminated by an Anthroposophical Understanding of the Human Being
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    • We have to imagine a certain degree of complexity in this movement if
    • to take our physical nature as it is now and assume that if we imagine
    • As you might imagine, this
    • Just imagine someone believes
  • Title: Human History: Lecture I: The Relation of the Human Being to the Supersensible Worlds
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    • materially imagined ether which one regarded, so to speak, as a
    • kind of magic cure for all outer natural phenomena long time.
    • our senses perceive. While one imagined this ether materially,
    • ether became a kind of magician and explainer. What happens, if
    • natural forces, which allows us imagining that without the
    • and then imagine this sensation increased, you can feel
    • imagine this, one could give him only by logical reasons a view
    • inside which they imagine as divine that prevails in the
  • Title: Human History: Lecture II: Death and Immortality
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    • Spiritual science is also forced to imagine
  • Title: Human History: Lecture IV: From Paracelsus to Goethe
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    • imagine this boy in this nature talking intimately with the
    • Son; and by imagination, we learn to recognise the
    • of nature in the years in which we can imagine Faust saying the
  • Title: Human History: Lecture VII: The Prophet Elijah
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    • forces and impulses. In order to imagine this, we want only
    • faced his soul as he could imagine Him in a vision and spoke,
    • You do not need to think about any magic.
  • Title: Human History: Lecture VIII: The Origin of the Human Being
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    • difficult to imagine the single forms of the living beings in
    • one imagines that strange living being from which the human
    • the waking state, namely removes tiredness, we have to imagine
    • that he could appear as a bodily being. We have to imagine that
    • naturalists imagine from the facts as material-sensory
    • know him spiritual-mentally, and then we can imagine how the
  • Title: Human History: Lecture X: Christ and the Twentieth Century
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    • Christian movement in world history, the human imaginative
    • how did gnosis imagine this descent of a wholly spiritual being
    • Gnosis imagined that an especially
    • for many persons. If you imagine such an event as the
    • elementary beginning of that what gnosis imagined what has gone
    • as an impulse caused by social imagination.
    • spiritual-scientifically, we have to imagine that the outer
  • Title: Human History: Lecture XI: Human History, Present, and Future in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • they cannot imagine that at the starting point of humanity,
    • correspond to an old human form that we have to imagine more
    • that we have to imagine the human development in such a way
    • myths. That faces us as Imaginations what the human being takes
    • Imaginative worldview faces us.
    • Someone attains a kind of Imaginative
    • himself to this Imaginative knowledge which presents itself
    • compare this Imaginative knowledge to the miraculous
    • imaginations of the Greek and pre-Greek myths, something faces
    • Imagination, he keeps his logical thinking in his Imaginations
    • into it and an Imaginative knowledge would not be right which
    • Imaginative world. Just in this respect, I made a rather
    • human development on earth Imaginatively, but also the former
    • absolutely correspond to Imaginative knowledge.
    • kind of Imaginative knowledge that can lead us to the
    • usual imagination but Imagination formed the myths, as they
    • all peoples on earth. Only not that Imagination about which we
    • talk spiritual-scientifically but an Imagination that was still
    • clairvoyant, not yet completed Imagination, no mere
    • imagination. It did not resemble something animal even if it
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  • Title: Human History: Lecture XII: Copernicus and His Time in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • cosmic space. They had to imagine the sun as something that
    • the universe because he imagines the universe as spirit-filled,
    • Imagination. But this original knowledge had to get lost
    • death. It is interesting how Aristoteles imagined the destiny
    • Imagine a spirit who is put into the
    • imagine a human being who is just endowed with this tendency we
    • Newton, we still recognise that he imagines — although he believes
    • at a physical being like the human being, one has to imagine
    • again at his death and to concentrate later again. He imagines
    • imagined that it is born from the spiritual world. As to
    • his philosophy that imagines the world composed of monads, we
    • imagine that somebody of the quite clever people would answer,
  • Title: Human History: Lecture XIV: The Self-Education of the Human Being
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    • only to imagine one thing, and we will realise at once that
    • sanctum of the other human being. We need only to imagine,
    • that we can not only remember, think, imagine, but that we
    • of our imagination, of our fancy. While the intellectual
  • Title: Human History: Lecture XVI: Darwin and the Supersensible Research
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    • Hence, he imagined the human progress in
    • spiritual world by his Imaginative, Inspirative and Intuitive
    • imagine that the human being had to overcome with his mental
    • new figure. Gobineau cannot imagine that in the human being in
    • So Gobineau could properly imagine the
    • is to be imagined as I have just characterised it.
  • Title: Migrations ...: Lecture 1: The Social Homunculus
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    • a change in social conditions. One might well imagine the following taking
    • Imagine this colossal
    • a most important fact. Imagine that Karl Marx's works had appeared,
    • the Vandals, the Suevi, etc. Imagine that these tribes had not encountered
    • South-West. Imagine that this stream of Christianity had not come; think
  • Title: Migrations ...: Lecture 2: What Form Can the Requirements of Social Life Take
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    • being produces the goods which he consumes (at least people imagine that
    • these obsolete state-structures, as people of Kautsky's type imagined.
    • are the processes which take place within the human organism! Imagine
    • of innumerable details. Imagine that your digestion were to depend on
  • Title: Migrations ...: Lecture 3: Emancipation of the Economic Process
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    • imaginations, inspirations and intuitions In reality, everything connected
    • imaginations, it is contained in imaginations. In the case of most people,
    • these imaginations can only well up from unconscious depths, in the
    • Imagination: Economic
    • intuition and imagination must work together in order to shape the
  • Title: Spirit and Matter: Lecture I: Spirit and Matter, Life and Death
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    • imagine the spiritual world after analogies. The earth with its
    • target the usual thinking and imagining sharply. Where the
    • which I hardly dare to imagine and can hardly express, is
    • everyday life and the usual science that you can imagine like
    • Imaginative life. The visions during the dream life are
    • were his thinking, his imagination about the surface of the
    • his imagination. Being awake means arranging the image life by
  • Title: Spirit and Matter: Lecture II: Destiny and Soul
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    • reality or whether it is imagined only in the whole course of
    • imaginations, but realities which spiritual science shows. But
    • beings there? There we can be tempted to imagine this or that
    • every action which we can imagine, which is induced by this or
    • that desire or affect, but while we intend an action or imagine
    • life is changed into the intensive dream imagination that
    • Imaginative knowledge in my writings with which the human being
    • This Imaginative cognition presents itself in pictures that are
    • not mere pictures of imagination, but point to a reality.
    • imagine the spiritual life that runs beyond the life between
    • birth and death. Now the soul can imagine the independent
    • imagine the postmortal life. The human being experiences
    • as the imaginary connections of the dream of the physical
  • Title: Spirit and Matter: Lecture III: Immortality, the Forces of Destiny, and the Course of Life
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    • heart by high poetic beauty, by wonderful imagination, by a
    • intimate, often ingenious imagination and thinking which is
    • sensory life, only spiritualising, which their imagination can
    • developed his thinking, his imagining, his feeling with the
    • just easier to imagine the rest in space, than the rest in
    • able to imagine that resting in time is possible. One can say,
  • Title: Spirit and Matter: Lecture IV: Human Soul and Human Body Considered Scientifically and Spiritual-Scientifically
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    • are partly supported with hypotheses, how one has to imagine
    • imagining counter-images can be found as it were within the
    • one has to imagine this association of mental pictures, the
    • one surveys what he has to say about the life of imagination
    • know that the human soul life has not only imagination in
    • itself. One must distinguish except imagining other soul
    • and considers it only as an adjunct of imagining. One may also
    • rule, actually? Nothing but the image of movement. I imagine as
    • that he distinguishes “imagining” and
    • has one to imagine this process Eduard von Hartmann means if
    • pan-psychism is right, one has to imagine it in such a way that
    • whole Faust lived in his imagination. However, this soul
    • imagination. You do not get beyond the mechanism of the soul
    • imagination; then something always takes place when we form a
    • this and that is imagined. Spiritual science will have to get
    • While we imagine, remember or think and do not take something
    • the psychic, of imagination itself. Then spiritual science has
    • normally. If the spiritual researcher proceeds Imaginatively,
    • is in such a way that in the imagination the human being
    • to the outside world whether we imagine it or not; it proceeds
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  • Title: Spirit and Matter: Lecture V: The Riddles of Soul and World in the German Cultural Life
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    • the sense impression and the imagination stop it happens that
    • researcher needs a certain width and mobility of imagination to
    • divide the whole of the human soul into the imagining life, the
    • imagining life is bound to the nervous organism in such a way
    • emotional life not as far as it is imagined, but as far as it
    • originates relates to respiration as the imagining life relates
    • imagination to the processes in the human nervous system or in
    • respiratory organism in this area, as the mere imagination is
    • concept, that means to imagine the world filled not only with
    • powerful imagination and thinking. They could not invigorate
    • in the metabolic processes, actually. We can imagine the
    • sensorily and affiliate the imagination? What corresponds to
    • etheric-bodily has become reality. This becomes Imagination. If
    • Imaginations, then they live immediately in the etheric, while
    • you know, I distinguish except the Imaginative knowledge the
    • the Imaginative knowledge is such an strengthening of the soul
    • can give, actually. What takes place in the imagining human
    • if the human being ascends to the Imaginative knowledge. In
    • Imagination instead of hallucination. Imagination is a purely
    • psychic experience, the soul lives with Imagination in the
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  • Title: Spirit and Matter: Lecture VI: Life, Death, and Immortality in the Universe
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    • long since, but Dewar still uses the discussion to imagine the
    • you imagine to the objective course of the world. Whether this
    • living together that one has still to imagine as saturated with
    • imagine Sir Oliver Lodge admits this too some connections in
    • have often called the first level of beholding Imagination to
    • life. One has to advance to this Imagination, which is a life
    • “We become physicists if we take Imaginative materials
    • forces.” That is, if we can also recognise Imaginatively
  • Title: Spirit and Matter: Lecture VII: The Beyond of the Senses and the Beyond of the Soul
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    • Then, however, the human being attains the Imaginative
    • knowledge at first that is not called “Imaginative”
    • because it is something imagined, but because it lives in
    • aware of the outer sensory world. With the Imaginative
    • you have to imagine that which you feel connected as thoughts
    • imagine in the dream life only suspecting is particularly
    • only perceive with Imaginative knowledge. However, if you look
    • inner Imaginations. If one generally gets to the Imaginative
    • world, you realise the interplay of the Imaginations of the
    • Imaginative knowledge to that which I have called there
    • With the Imaginative knowledge, we submerge in a world of the
    • you are imagining, and the imagined remains in your soul, and
    • later this imagined is brought up again from the soul, you say,
    • in yourself with Imaginative knowledge, you are also able to
    • thinking, imagining, joy, and hatred and so on, but these
  • Title: Answers to Big Questions: Lecture I: The Nature of Spiritual Science and Its Significance for the Present
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    • Imagine the immense theoretical progress of science which one
    • reasonable!” Imagine which inner laughter such a sentence
    • tools of thinking, imagination, feeling, and will-impulses are
  • Title: Answers to Big Questions: Lecture V: The Nature of Sleep
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    • what we imagine what we want what we feel. Now the question
    • imagine that for our consciousness, for our knowledge of the
    • imagine the phenomenon of the awake life and sleep.
    • suitable forces are just worn out. We have to imagine if we
    • Thus, one has pictures, imaginations of an activity that has
    • that one has imagined in former times when one looked more at
    • such things best of all if we imagine certain phenomena that
    • we imagine that a part of the whole reality is given by our
    • we have to imagine the conscious day life in such a way —
    • state. We have to imagine it as independent from the bodily
    • bearer of imaginations that remain unnoticed for years, which
    • of such imaginations going unnoticed, but it also is generally
    • is rather mysterious, otherwise. Hence, we have to imagine the
    • difficult to imagine with the concepts that we have already
    • of imagination. In the sleep, we restore them, so that they can
  • Title: Answers to Big Questions: Lecture VII: How Does One Attain Knowledge of the Spiritual World?
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    • get to it by imagination. Indeed, imagination offers things,
    • are ways beyond imagination, ways into the spiritual world that
    • lead on firmer ground than imagination, it was possibly not the
    • History of German Imagination. He had in mind to
    • represent the workings of imagination as a goddess in the
    • what the human being creates in his imagination. Many a person
    • goes just with pleasure to this realm of imagination because it
    • imagination, in its workings. On the other side, he did not
    • another realm than only in that of imagination, namely in the
    • five fingers of the hand, he gives the imagination of the poet
    • Laplace-Kant imagination of the origin and future fall of the
    • cannot imagine any more futile perspective for the future than
    • It is the thirst for knowledge and a sign of ill imagination
    • or at least imagining the ascent to the spiritual world
    • to eradicate all that from the soul, try to imagine it as not
    • while imagining: I look, for example, at a plant; I say about
    • quite imaginary, of something fictional. However, a mental
    • human soul is given away to such a pictorial imagination if
    • pictures that are not got out of imagination arbitrarily, but
    • the spiritual world. — This is the level of Imaginative
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  • Title: Answers to Big Questions: Lecture VIII: Predisposition, Talent and Education of the Human Being
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    • concerned had an excellent imagination, he could have very well
    • mobility with which activity of imagination, pictorial
    • imagination, ingenuity are also connected as heritage from the
    • could tell stories with whom the imagination functioned most
    • outline. Since what the imagination takes up as a picture, as a
    • However where is so nicely declaimed that the imagination plays
    • imagination, but only the pictorial one.
    • say, if you want to imagine an object, you must move in such a
    • shows us how the pictorial, vivid imagination twitches in our
  • Title: Answers to Big Questions: Lecture XIV: Moses
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    • prevailed. We can imagine this consciousness if we start from
    • divine-spiritual beings. As we can imagine — however, we
    • forces imagined as separated before in a uniform soul life, in
    • imagine, because no other information could intermingle
    • the time passed over them. Thus, we have to imagine the
    • the animal organisation. We have to imagine that the entire
    • animal imagination and the animal soul life is dreamlike, vague
    • to imagine the old clairvoyance connected instinctively with
    • weather for hours. Imagine that because of their clairvoyance
  • Title: Answers to Big Questions: Lecture XV: What Has Astronomy to Say about the Origin of the World?
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    • imagining a growing, developing plant, apart from more complex
    • molecules. One imagined that every material consists of
    • Briefly, one imagined to be able to reduce all phenomena of
    • imagine — if it depends only on movement — a
    • space! If it is true and we imagine the human brain so
    • that signifies development as it were. Imagine how fatal it
    • edifice, and one tries to imagine the origin of the universe
    • terrestrial atmosphere — if we imagine the terrestrial
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture I: Haeckel, the Riddles of the World and Theosophy
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    • of childish imagination of former human epochs, if one supposed
    • Imagine that an art historian describes the big realm of
    • Imagine also that somebody comes and says with regard to this
    • against it as an imagination, because this is almost in such a
    • pain etcetera? — Imagine the whirling atoms and you will
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture III: Basic Concepts of Theosophy. Soul and Spirit of the Human Being
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    • understand how much of that which you imagine would also apply
    • soul at first. Imagine, you have an object before yourselves.
    • Imagine that you have made a point of bringing in sense and
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture IV: Spiritual Science and the Social Question
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    • also spoke about the incapability of some people to imagine the
    • imagine the ego.
    • Imagine — this is a paradoxical comparison — a man
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture V: The Question of Women's Rights
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    • point of view. Of course, nobody should imagine that spiritual
    • completely differently than some people theoretically imagined
    • eternally-female draws us upwards.” Thus, one imagined
    • to see something female, the imagination, which the male
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture VI: The Basic Concepts of Theosophy. Human Races
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    • with sound waves. Imagine that these sound waves could be
    • growth of plants out of his nature using the special magic
    • to carry out certain magic effects. All that also was connected
    • like with magic, briefly, what the Lemurian was able to do
    • normally does not imagine at all how infinitely big the changes
    • longer use the magic forces but has to rely on the mechanical.
    • behind descendants, and thus we can imagine that the train, of
    • Arabian-Chaldean race. Then, however, we must imagine another
    • imagine them also in such a way that it originated from the
    • the ancient Celtic population. We can imagine that we had an
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture VII: The Core of Wisdom in the Religions
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    • imagine that the human being advances further, that abilities
    • imaginative strength was undeveloped. There we can have an
    • imagine that for anybody who has no ear no sounding world, but
    • imagination and their life of thought was in such a way that
    • they were almost innumerate. Imagine the dream life, but
    • imagine a humanity from whose souls such pictures arise that
    • everything that is external round us. One has to imagine the
    • India. Development was the magic word by which the human being
    • it. Buddha did not speak out of his imagination but out of his
    • being of the entire internal imagination. Persona
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture VIII: Fraternity and the Struggle for Existence
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    • human beings who co-operate in a brotherhood are magicians
    • may imagine how remote humanity is from such a principle of
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture IX: Inner Development
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    • to the outer one. Imagine once — to give you an example
    • rule his lower self speaks, even if he imagines ever so much
    • magic — that school of esoteric development which leads
    • because you do not feel. You cannot imagine, you cannot think
    • which we can call imagination which is somewhat related to the
    • The other stage is the imaginative knowledge. One develops this
    • higher world. Imagine once that you would be a human being with
    • However, one can give some help. Imagine that a human being
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture X: Christmas as Symbol of the Sun's Victory
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    • sciences imagine, the human body was fertilised by the
    • us imagine the life of the spirit. The darkness precedes the
    • itself. If you imagine that a master builder builds a house,
    • all times one imagined the way of the human being on earth in
    • Imagine the sun deviating for a moment, for a fraction of a
    • second only, and imagine the unbelievable, indescribable mess,
    • the sun are connected with this harmony. Imagine the sun in the
    • spring, imagine how little you are able to think that the
    • used. Imagine that the seeds are sown at another time and the
    • the other hand, imagine how wisely the life powers are arranged
    • What did one imagine what happened in the soul of such a hero
    • who had found such an inner harmony? — One imagined that
    • today, one can imagine only that certain matters are decided by
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XI: The Christian Teachings of Wisdom
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    • un-anthroposophic that one can imagine. If we mean it sincerely
    • depend on the fact that we imagine that we find the way to
    • regard as the right way. It depends not on our imaginations,
    • not enough that we have the subjective conviction and imagine
    • we want to imagine the whole significance of this new, we have
    • to blood on huge stone giants. The modern worker cannot imagine
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XII: Reincarnation and Karma
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    • you imagine the usual productive strength in the usual sensuous
    • for the new life. Now imagine this transferred to the
    • spiritual, imagine an individuality who produces the big,
    • centuries? Imagine this element in the human nature, and then
    • what one calls karma. Imagine, you work on anything from
    • putting himself in danger and damaging himself, if this faces
    • there are accounts and balances in the accounting. Imagine now
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XIII: Lucifer
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    • remind of something completely known and you imagine how a
    • a magic word and wants to make the human existence
    • so to speak, to further its existence. Imagine only once that
    • sensuous love, the principle of the natural force only imagined
    • unity, as well as all reluctant forces of nature are imagined
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XIV: The Children of Lucifer
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    • imagine an animal eating the plants instinctively, which are
    • Greeks imagined that he developed the human being up to his
    • Greek imagined that the god Dionysus led the human beings up to
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XV: Germanic and Indian Secret Doctrines
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    • outranking the human being. How we have to imagine the beings,
    • which are lower than the human being is? We have to imagine
    • how the imagination of the people works, who do not know that
    • it is far from the imagination of the people to make up gods
    • consciousness; this is the astral or imaginative consciousness.
    • imaginative consciousness, which leads him into the astral
    • However, others have a more developed imaginative
    • in the astral. One must read the number 341 in the imaginative
    • member was still lower. The imaginative consciousness meets
    • Imagine a person standing beside a machine and studying it. He
    • has a receptive knowledge. Imagine, however, the inventor who
    • finally, to the solid. Thus, the Indian doctrine imagines the
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XVI: German Theosophists at the Beginning of the Nineteenth Century
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    • human covers basically that are not to be imagined, however,
    • This comes out in his imagination. The former incarnations
    • completely became imagination in Novalis because they cast
    • way: imagine somebody retained at the moment of death, so that
    • more about magic spiritual life there than in that which was
    • wise man comes and tells about the magic life, about spiritual
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XVII: Siegfried and the Twilight of the Gods
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    • legend, we find Siegfried in the possession of the magic hood
    • processes it with reason and imagination. If, however, the soul
    • basis, one imagined the soul as something female, thus, for
    • human being; they always wore a magic hood. It is evident to
    • calls this living in imagination and creating
    • the myth, and we have something similar if we imagine how an
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XVIII: Parzival and Lohengrin
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    • Lohengrin legends. We want to imagine how the being of
    • highest that the human being can imagine as the jewel, as the
    • What are these? In the Middle Ages one imagined the Round Table
    • as the scholars imagine. This folk consciousness recorded an
    • on one side, the magic castle of Klingsor and the enchantress
    • Holy Grail and on the other side in the magic castle. On one
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XX: Inner Development
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    • now and again how one has to imagine this development. You all
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XXI: Paracelsus
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    • imagine how he approaches an ill human being. With an intuitive
    • imagines this, and how he tries to make clear with his own
    • later ones. He calls Moses, Daniel, and Enoch not magicians,
  • Title: Riddles of the World: Lecture XXII: Jacob Boehme
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    • from a deep spring, with immense deepness and magic power.
    • Jacob Boehme was one of the greatest magicians of all times, of
    • touched that all, it would lose its magic, which one can only
    • have to imagine that the tinctura lives in the world like the
    • in the world. One must not imagine that the original acerbic
    • Boehme imagines the great master builder of the world as an
    • imagination. Imagination is a soul force that is in the middle
    • from within. Someone who is able to do this has imagination. It
    • sensuous things. Thus, the imaginative human being is able to
    • become a magician. Because Jacob Boehme understood this, we are
    • allowed to call him the greatest magician of the new time.
    • Jacob Boehme calls imagination the great virgin of nature, the
    • further on to the original divine imagination. He says, the
    • divine imagination imprinted the original spiritual human being
    • sensuous human being from within due to his own imagination of
  • Title: Spiritual-Scientific Consideration: Lecture 2: Esoteric Prelude to an Exoteric Consideration of the Social Question I
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    • Attainment. must rise to this new Imagination, to a
    • mystic dreams a wide-awake Imagination; in the place of
  • Title: Spiritual-Scientific Consideration: Lecture 3: Esoteric Prelude to an Exoteric Consideration of the Social Question II
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    • which may be pleasing because he imagines it is connected
    • intuitive, or, better, an imaginative grasp of various
    • immediately arises of contemplating him in imaginative
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture I: The Mission of Occult Science in Our Time
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    • imagination.
    • relation to his own life! Imagine only, when does the point of
    • Imagination or clairvoyance, Inspiration and Intuition
    • Imagine that there are human beings who live in a distant area
    • I mean this. Imagine two persons, a much-learnt man who knows
    • between an adept and an initiate if you imagine the following:
    • imagine a region where are railways and you have seen them. Now
    • civilisation even if they imagine to have nerves like ropes —
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture II: Natural Science Facing a Crucial Decision
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    • exerts an ineffable magic power on our
    • world with all imaginable instruments and skilfully developed
    • prove that feeling and imagining are a real world, and that not
    • Imagine the picture of
    • of thermodynamics had assumed such a shape that one imagined
    • on the human organism or on the brain which one also imagined
    • imagined as such a movement of the atoms! One must retain this.
    • himself radically could have said the following: imagine all
    • Wilhelm L., 1646–1716) in those days. — Imagine once — Du
    • imagine it enlarged, so that you can go for a walk in it like
    • if we imagine atoms, we can only say, something like a fluid
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture III: The Knowledge of Soul and Spirit
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    • to imagine the contrast of the transformation of the astral
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture IV: Initiation
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    • Someone who does not know the matters imagines that the human
    • Imagine once how the
    • imagining, you can get the idea that today it looks different
    • human being can imagine who knows the physical world only. Even
    • feeling happens with the help of Imagination at the school of
    • feeling by Imagination
    • them into these worlds. You need Imagination. This is not
    • anything that one imagines.
    • following to the pupil: imagine the plant and its pure, chaste
    • puts a great Imagination before him. This spiritual science
    • Imagine the difference
    • accompany this Imagination with our sensations and feelings if
    • life that was around the pupil, it became Imagination. Where he
    • Imaginative of the world, he was guided not only to the
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture VI: The So-Called Dangers of Initiation
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    • more sophisticatedly — monistic literature. Imagine a person
    • of all by a comparison. Imagine, in any corner of a room one
    • extent a danger exists. Imagine a human being who is near a
    • is something very healthy from a higher viewpoint. Imagine once
    • because they know for selfish reasons what may result. Imagine
    • something is elated once and rhetorical another time. Imagine,
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture VIII: The Soul of the Animal in the Light of Spiritual Science
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    • following way. Imagine, you commit something naughty towards
    • clear by a comparison, imagine that I stand before you, before
    • memory “has” the animal, imagination
    • imagination, is possessed by memory. The animal is a limb of a
    • higher being that has memory and imagination. The wise
    • only imagines this descent, but it knows how to investigate it
    • abilities like supersensible memory, supersensible imagination,
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture XI: Occupation and Earnings
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    • technology and industry? Imagine once hypothetically what would
    • However, we can imagine
    • the product they created. Try to imagine the medieval cities.
    • look in the workshops where these things were created. Imagine
    • imagine the industrial worker, the worker in the factories who
    • everything that concerns occupation and acquisition. Imagine a
    • and then imagine the mood of a human being who stands as sooted
    • Imagine what it makes up if the workers can accomplish their
    • think socially soon becomes aware of that. Imagine, you sit
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture XII: Sun, Moon and Stars
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    • spiritual only with artistic imagination, can experience it in
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture XIII: Outset and End of the Earth
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    • earth, and imagine anyone could observe the evolution from a
    • then we have to imagine the true nature of the human being
    • imagine in your fantastic spiritual science that this
    • immediately at the earth's beginning. — Can you imagine that
    • thinks about spirit and matter. Imagine once, somebody has
    • so that a part freezes in the middle. Imagine, you have many
    • Imagine the human being as a spiritual being at the beginning
    • imagine a plant realm without mineral basis. Such a researcher
    • cannot imagine that the denser, coarser processes arise from
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture XIV: The Hell
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    • different times. One must not imagine at all that these words
    • ourselves in which human imagination dresses our problem. From
    • and it is the bearer of the whole life of thought and imaging,
    • imagine the moment of death now. We can do this, using what
    • life. Imagine this extract, this life essence in such a way, as
  • Title: Knowledge of Soul and Spirit: Lecture XV: The Heaven
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    • originates from its imagination. The natural sciences have
    • — imagine the human auditory organ on an imperfect stage — what
    • allowed to imagine that this development is something similar
    • human beings possibly imagine that it must grow out like an eye
    • world. Imagine a human being who listens to a symphony. He lets
    • Imagine now, it would be possible that a human being creates
    • intense than in the physical world. Hence, we have to imagine
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 1
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    • have composed a sort of Manifesto, and imagine it may be listened to
    • August 1914, they saw this structure firmly established and imagined
    • cease the pride and presumption of those who imagine themselves to be
    • Utopian. Utopians who set up their programmes imagine everything to
    • for life everywhere. I can quite well imagine that nothing may remain
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 2
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    • concepts. Many in leading circles as well as among the proletariat imagine
    • and is not in accordance with reality. But imagine that one of you were
    • account if at first the affair does not go as one had imagined, it need
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 3
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    • imagine that when the economic life, in their sense, will have been
    • will not imagine that we can hope for success in the Appeal and all
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 4
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    • unconscious though living imagination.
    • Graeco-Latin life of spirit. In this the ancient imaginations remained,
    • ideas and concepts there were weaving the figurative, the imaginative.
    • of our fifth post-Atlantian epoch that imaginations have vanished from
    • after renewed imagination. (This is true of the present and will continue
    • striving for imaginations.
    • Unconscious imaginations as the source of the life of spirit.
    • Unconscious imaginations with concepts.
    • Concepts striving for imaginations.
    • to meet this striving for imaginations. The overwhelmingly greater part
    • arisen in regard to the spiritual life the greatest imaginable egoism,
    • sense it aids man in his striving. Just imagine a building the inside
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 5
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    • I can imagine that many people today, concerned about the injustices
    • secret Imaginations are experienced. And only when these are actually
    • thing of the imagination that the manual worker should give his work,
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 6
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    • the most vivid imagination he could never have a thought-out a world
    • a suit of clothes. Imagine what all that would mean! In reality, however,
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 7
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    • man must rise consciously to Imagination and grasp the spiritual life
  • Title: The Social Question as a Question of Consciousness: Lecture 8
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    • imagine the existence of a pure tissue of ideas. In this pure tissue
    • for once to imagine the reason and the soul-life of a God who would
    • by his own powers of perception and imagination. But this perception
    • and imagination of Hegel's sometimes endanger the understanding of what
    • be imagined than these thoughts about human abstraction, if one bears
    • Now imagine that a man —
    • which at the time I called moral imagination, that is, upon what, expressed
  • Title: The Karma of the Individual and the Collective Life of Our Time, Goethe
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    • can you imagine that the evolution of modern humanity would
    • must indeed have some such thoughts. Just imagine: Goethe was
  • Title: The Cyclic Movement of Sleeping and Waking
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    • now imagine, happening- with any human being, what I described
    • that they can only be explained if we imagine objective Wisdom,
    • imagine the animal included in the whole 'circuit' of objective
    • with. Far more than we imagine, we burrow in mere words. This
    • dream— imagine that they dream, and go about parroting
    • Imagine that it happened so with every would-be Professor or
    • must imagine Dr. Steiner drawing on the blackboard as he
  • Title: Insertion of Early Human Destiny into Extraterrestial Relationships
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    • short-sighted way. People often imagine that it was in olden
    • might imagine: Men would increasingly lose interest in that
    • often no more than the fantastic imaginings of men who think
    • ‘calling’; we imagine: ‘That to which the man
    • sects imagine. It cannot remain as it now is, for it is
    • with his imagination future technical developments, is well
    • definite result will be made possible. Imagine at some future
    • imagine that the world can manage with a one-sided
    • would be a queer crank, would she not, who imagined this,
    • anyone imagines that external evolution can go forward by
  • Title: Concerning the Nature of Pain, Suffering, Joy, and Bliss
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    • Let us now imagine that
    • Let us imagine a man who
    • of knowledge, not only, as blissfulness, and the imaginative pictures
    • of bodily pain may become a kind of training, a path of knowledge. Imagine
    • fact that I have a brain, for I have never felt it. Let us now imagine
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 1
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    • Just imagine the situation:
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 2
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    • to be philosophical and so imagine materialism to be transcended. This
    • imagine that someone like Verworn could begin to understand even the
    • whose speculations are mainly concerned with matter; they imagine that
    • At the stage of imaginative perception atoms reveal what they truly
    • not the case, the whole issue is based on illusion. To imaginative cognition
    • A wrong interpretation might imagine the empty space in the bulb of
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 3
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    • is well known and is imaginatively expressed in various religions in
    • though in decreasing strength, atavistic, imaginative clairvoyance.
    • the pain first came about. Let us now imagine that it is not a question
    • would result. And now imagine that two particularly sensitive places
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 4
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    • Century. He begins by saying that: “Before the war the West imagined
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 5
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    • Let us for a moment imagine
    • of the social structure. One cannot imagine a more powerful example
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 6
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    • emerges which is very different from what is imagined by those who feel
    • than is imagined takes place under the influence of spiritual powers
    • Imagine a person occupying
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 7
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    • a far greater extent than is imagined today. At the present time it
    • is inspired into us or vouchsafed through Imagination can we come to
    • ought not to imagine that Luther believed the devil walked about the
    • in Imaginations. However, Imagination does express the reality of what
    • one's imagination Luther, standing there in the 17th Century, must be
    • phenomenon. It would be a mistake to imagine that anyone could repeat
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 8
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    • more abrupt than imagined. Natural science, in itself fully justified,
    • behind the physical world. I can well imagine that a modern student
    • received from that world? If you imagine this feeling intensified to
    • his connection with spiritual reality. What we designate as Imagination
  • Title: Karma of Materialism: Lecture 9
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    • further one's salvation. However as he was climbing he had an Imagination
    • man to deepen and strengthen his inner life. Just imagine what would
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture I
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    • the new dough. Try to imagine how ancient materials which had
    • magical words awaken within him began to be present in these
    • intonation of magical cultic words in sacred places enabled
    • mysteries — man learns a magical language and begins
    • intonation of magical words.
    • urns were ignited, and smoke ascended. The magical language
    • created an Imagination of the intoned words in the rising
    • such a way that a sacred Imagination emerged from the
    • shaped, magical words and prayers flamed up in the sacrificial
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture II
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    • magical words in cultic ceremonies. These words either worked
    • else magical words were spoken into the smoke in the way which
    • was indicated yesterday, and the smoke drew Imaginations out of
    • People intoned magical words into their breath in Europe, and
    • air streaming in and out of them was taken hold of by magical,
    • cultic words. The striving up of magical forces towards divine
    • intonation of the magical, cultic words. Whenever someone
    • intoned magical, cultic or prayerful words they were ascending
    • still say: when I speak magical cultic words, a god is speaking
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture III
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    • its images or Imaginations becomes united with my own ego. And
    • this. When a human being moves upwards through Imagination,
    • black magic is not entirely unfounded. This idea of the people
    • want to report about the appearance or the Imagination of Jesus
    • things are really being said here. An Imaginative element in
    • you imagine John the priest in this way, with the vision of
    • mankind — you have the picture or Imagination which
    • such a way that it is like the Imagination I described. This is
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture IV
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    • placed the image or Imagination of the author of the Apocalypse
    • an explanation of the Imagination or as something which will
    • grand Imagination stands before us here. The transfigured son
    • Imagination in very ancient times, and the Apocalypticer placed
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture VI
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    • connected with it in the external way that one usually imagines
    • sound elements before your souls. Now try to imagine what
    • Apocalyptic Imagination of an Alpha and Omega surrounded by
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture VII
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    • esoteric Hebraic teachings conceive of this. One imagined how
    • Imagine some human action. It can be looked at from two sides;
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture VIII
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    • can imagine the spiritual idea someone would have to get of the
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture IX
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    • advance. He looked for an image or the right Imagination in
    • imaginative pictures. And so he renewed and summarized an idea
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture X
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    • magnificent Imagination is none other than the unified God. And
    • let's imagine the things which describe the self in various
    • Imagine it quite vividly: He has a name which only He
    • with the magnificent Imagination that appears here. Just
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XI
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    • Let's imagine that we are in the world into which the
    • Imagination even clearer. All those who will participate in the
    • imaginable prospects of meeting John and then the Christ
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XII
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    • wonderful Imaginations which will arise from the inner warmth
    • Imagination during the course of this century. Much
    • Imagination, until the fourth post Atlantean age, when the ego
    • Imaginationvall appear in the age which will be followed by the
    • Let's imagine what happens here in a vivid way. One will look
    • humanity. And the content of this Imagination is connected with
    • men through visions and Imaginations. The Christ is present in
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XIII
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    • Imaginations before one and Inspiration speaks into them. Then
    • one sees the Imaginations spread out before one in a pictorial
    • these ideas in the Apocalypse that are given as Imaginations,
    • Livius, you can imagine what a storm the Italian state will
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XIV
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    • Apocalypse which is an Imagination of the Apocalypticer and
    • appears which is the cosmic Imagination of what mankind is
    • to imagine what the combined thoughts of Lenin, Trotsky,
    • Lunacharski, etc., looks like, if one imagines what is growling
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XV
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    • will now try to imagine how what is said about the woes, etc.,
    • Imaginations which the spiritual investigator gives — if
    • — we can well imagine that divine love which unfolds in
    • can imagine that when divine love that appears in light is
    • magic on a large scale near the end of the Atlantean period of
    • through their dealings with black magic was the events in
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XVI
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    • collision was inevitable. Just imagine the atmosphere at the
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XVII
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    • enabled him to find the things in his imaginative visions as
    • However, one could also imagine — and the idea is a
    • Imaginative way.
    • the astral, Imaginative world or to what one can call the soul
    • one should consider that while man treads this Imaginative
    • like the Apocalypticer if one wants to try to imagine what his
    • of the spirit in world space, and he imagines that when this
    • you imagine that this blackboard is a tapestry that is spread
    • these processes and one didn't imagine these things in a very
    • The Apocalypticer imagines all of this in accordance with the
  • Title: The Apocalypse: Lecture XVIII
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    • Devil a Figment of the Imagination? You should also study his
    • one would like to say: If we imagine that we have a chalice, in
    • standing there for the transubstantiation. And as you imagine
    • the end of these reflections. You can imagine that the most
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture 10: Disputa and The School of Athens of Raphael
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    • The artistic description of the imaginative spiritual
    • has grown. And more difficult yet it is for the person of today to imagine
    • used to think of imagination as the first step of vision into the higher
    • earthly world which entered into imagination, then we say something
    • correct. Imagination at that time was something alive, and Raphael painted
    • the living imaginations which existed in the souls. Envisioning the
    • of imagination.
    • These imaginations were
    • place instead of that which was called imagination — and is again
    • called imaginative vision — the externally substantive conception
    • about such matters, spoke about imaginations. And this picture is an
    • image of such an imagination.
    • I might say “the imaginative looking of humanity” did gradually
    • imagine the christian ideas to be much more spiritual than one is prone
    • Who knows what reasons one or the other person imagines might have been,
    • in a much more living way than we tend to imagine this nowadays. Those
    • a world which at this time we must imagine as penetrating the clouds,
    • from the trinity. Such imaginations, as they live in the heads of the
    • with the imaginations which present themselves out of the old, clairvoyant,
    • into the fifth the whole imaginative, spiritual picturing of the fourth,
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  • Title: History of Art: Lecture 11: Fourth and Fifth Post-Atlantean Epochs, Medieval Art in the Middle, West, and South of Europe
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    • space behind it. One is forced to imagine that behind this picture,
    • imagine nothing but the spiritual world, naturally spoken radically,
    • it is no longer possible to imagine the heavens immediately behind it.
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture 12: Greek and Early Christian Art, Symbolic Signs, the Mystery of Gold
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    • the sign, the sign which brings “magic”. Take this well
    • in mind! The sign which works magic! This really is the sign out of
    • magic. And that Priest who didn't cast the runes, he had the task of
    • sign” to enter? Because in the sign, the Magic was seen, the working
    • of Magic which happens not merely through what moves through whatever
    • into each other. You see the "sign" used as magic, as the
    • You can imagine very well, as a simplified and yet higher forming, the
    • spoken much about “the Magic of the Signs”. What Egyptian
    • in the mysteries concerning the “Magic of the Signs”. That
    • was the magic which came from the one side, from the spiritual side,
    • that magic, which one attempted to bring about by forming signs, purely
    • where magic was sought. And this is very significant that on one side the
    • magic was sought, I would like to say, in the supernatural. The natural,
    • art of the Greek. In supernatural signs, that magic was sought, which
    • simply was contained in the sign. But the magic was sought also
    • sub-natural magic, of that magic which one discovers if one looks mostly
    • the sense of the heights, in whom the supersensible works as magic, so
    • inner part of the earth, then what one finds what contains the magic
    • Magics”, one attempted particularly to recognize two riddles.
    • the true, historic facts. The “Magic of the Sign” was taken on
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  • Title: History of Art: Lecture 13: The Changes in the Conception of Christ During a Certain Period of Time
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    • conception of art. Let us imagine that a Spirit has asked the question:
    • this unimaginative Rome. The duality in which Rome was always great was
    • is, in its essence, devoid of imagination.
    • the positive stimulus for imagination from the East. (Unfortunately
    • principle, originated through the fertilization of the unimaginative
    • so to speak, on an inartistic, unimaginative ground which is only fitted
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 1
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    • pervades the soul like a magic breath, whereas in the
    • Magi are guided to the birthplace of Jesus by a star. But
    • eyes to these heights. It shows us three men, three Magi,
    • were often magicians and sorcerers of an inferior type,
    • to engage in very questionable magical practices, indeed
    • not infrequently in actual black magic. To the South lay
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 2
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    • external Imaginations of the wisdom of successive epochs.
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 3
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    • physical and etheric bodies. But it must not be imagined
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 4
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    • readily imagine that one thing was essential for Abraham.
    • be imagined that everything brought to light here from
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 6
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    • the three wise Magi, set out from the East; they knew
    • himself who as the ‘Star’ led the three Magi
    • than anything else that the three Magi at that time were
    • hundred years before the Christian era the Magi of the
    • Zarathustra moving towards Palestine that guided the Magi
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 8
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    • magic that which as an ordinary human being I need in
    • magic. It seems strange to say this, but although wishes
    • into claiming the power to create food by magic, to
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 9
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    • that he cannot create his means of nourishment by magic
    • can therefore imagine how in many centres of the ancient
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 10
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    • develops a kind of Imaginative vision, a vision
    • consisting of true Imaginations. Those who were around
    • Himself chosen and guided, was different. Imaginations
    • Imaginations were awakened in their souls and insight
    • compared with those of waking life and sleep. The magical
    • Imaginative clairvoyance the disciples could feel: In our
    • deeply significant, namely the magical intercourse of
    • mystery of the down-streaming, magical power of the
    • of Imaginative, astral vision streamed from Christ to His
    • Imaginative vision, as it were in astral pictures, but
    • Do not ever imagine that the movement connected with him
  • Title: Gospel/Matthew (1965): Lecture 11
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    • more pictorial, imaginative character, and another rather
    • words alone but is presenting to them the Imagination,
    • into humanity as if by magic, as an outcome of the
  • Title: Real Being of Man
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    • pre-Christian Judaism imagined as standing under the guidance
    • fluidic elements of the more fantastic or imaginative side,
  • Title: Man and Cosmos
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    • so we must now say: "If we imagine a man diagrammatically we
    • objective perceptions, but spiritual imaginations. And these
    • imaginations are all the time coming from inside the earth into
    • imaginations. Man does not perceive these pictures with his
    • a nature as to be unable to perceive imaginations. And so man
    • weakens down these imaginations and they become his
    • imagination and therefore is not perceived by your ordinary
    • earthly man had the power for these imaginations, then he would
    • out of your ordinary consciousness to imaginations, so that you
    • really have the occult imaginative consciousness before you,
    • this imaginative consciousness. Not merely, for example, the
    • with imagination — the ego and the astral body are free
    • perceives, it is the astral body. If now the imaginative
    • utilitarian life, at once his imaginative cognition would be
    • them in a healthy way through Imagination and Inspiration. Now
    • knowledge. One who possesses Imagination dare not apply the
    • imaginative power of his astral body which is rooted in the
    • art when through imagination you perceive the gold content of
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 1, Lecture 1
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    • In the ascent to Imagination, in the
    • entire process of climbing, ascending to imaginative knowledge, we
    • help us to penetrate up into imaginative knowledge. The sense
    • perception, though only of dreamlike imaginations.
    • Now imagine the Roman world in its
    • decline; and then imagine, within that world, what still
    • imagination. They knew that the angel, the guardian, was working in
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 1, Lecture 2
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    • doubtless the initial impulse toward an imaginative way of observing.
    • imaginative means of observation.
    • etheric form of a plant is an example of an Imagination, but of an
    • Imagination that is not directly visible in the spiritual world but
    • If you were to ask, what is an Imagination?
    • — We could answer that the plants are all Imaginations, but as
    • Imaginations they are visible only to imaginative consciousness. That
    • genuine Imaginations. We have Imaginations all around us in the forms
    • allowed to hold onto the etheric; we must imagine the animal form
    • a merely imagined concept into an inspired concept. When it is a
    • say that the plant world is a sum total of concepts, of Imaginations.
    • In the case of a plant the Imagination is not itself actually living.
    • body becomes visible outwardly. But you see, Imagination is required
    • understood imaginatively. When Paracelsus spoke about the sweat
    • imaginative, what is inspired, and what is intuitive, and thereby to
    • through inspired Imagination.
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 1, Lecture 3
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    • up to certain imaginative pictures, I wanted to draw attention
    • to certain things. I wanted to show how in such an imaginative
    • picture as that of Christ as the Lamb of God, inspired Imaginations
    • devotion at those imaginations from earlier times in which Christian
    • reason, came near to being Imaginations. But I also drew your
    • could reach Imagination but not Inspiration. He saw the
    • Imagination; with plant life he did, but got no further because
    • able to express in Imaginations up to the truly spiritual. Hence, he
    • actually on the way from his Imaginations to Inspirations and
    • pictorial method, the symbolism, the imaginative contemplation which
    • imaginative presentation of the world.
    • with Imaginations such as those developed by Goethe for the world of
    • everything expressed in the style of Imaginations of the plant world
    • What they would have needed was the ascent from Imagination to
    • the imaginative world in Schiller. Only then could they have
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 1, Lecture 4
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    • allowed him to say to himself (if we were to imagine such an initiate
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 2, Lecture I
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    • If you can imagine the human being this
    • I have called these pictures Imaginations. These Imaginations, which
    • with the pain involved in imaginative knowledge, the pain that
    • rise through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition and how,
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 2, Lecture II
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    • For the most part in that book Imaginations
    • describe these things not so much from an Imaginative point of view,
    • more and more the case. But you must not imagine that the human lung,
    • the word “table,” but if you manage to imagine vividly
    • imagine. This physical imagination of theirs lacks even a
    • space itself has been taken away. If you begin by imagining space as
    • imagine that the forces causing it to point are only within the
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 2, Lecture III
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    • imagine human history as being more similar to the events and
    • Imaginations. They saw the whole world filled with dreamlike
    • Imaginations. They could say: That is the last glimmer of the
    • way as animal-like as natural science today imagines. These primitive
    • of the wise men from the Orient, the three kings or magi, we see
  • Title: Mystery Trinity: Part 2, Lecture IV
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    • That is not to say that we should imagine a
    • blossom with our soul forces we express, in the Imagination of the
    • immense opposition, perhaps of a kind you cannot even imagine today,
  • Title: Illusory Illness: Lecture I: Illusory Illness
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    • Thus one can see what power fantasy and perverted imagination
    • have the least imaginable effect on the organism. What we learn
    • in our abstract sciences has the least imaginable effect on our
    • century. Here you have a picture, an imagination that is set
    • but in a picture, in an imagination.
    • imagination of the Holy Grail, then one has food and
    • world in truth, and receive it in such imaginations. Then these
    • imaginations work lawfully upon the organism, harmonizing it.
    • These imaginations, however, work as health-bringing, inner
    • impulses. Imaginations bring about effects, and if these be
    • true world-pictures, imaginations, they work in a
    • of forming these inner imaginations, then all his forces stream
    • imaginations to let himself be deceived by false images. He
  • Title: Illusory Illness: Lecture II: The Feverish Pursuit of Health
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    • This is most important. Imagine as vividly as you can a
  • Title: Esoteric Studies: Lecture I: Cosmic Aspect of Life Between Death and New Birth
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    • the children's souls, on their imagination! People do say: The
  • Title: Esoteric Studies: Lecture II: Establishment of Mutual Relations Between the Living and the So-called Dead
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    • Just imagine the great upheaval, one might also say of the
    • with a certain impure imagination about the facts of the
  • Title: Olaf Oesteson: The Awakening of the Earth Spirit
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    • “imagination.” Olaf Oesteson is a type of
  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture I: The Human Soul in the Supersensible Realm and Its Relationship to the Body
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    • arisen from the imagination of single ones.
    • one did not want to recourse to images of imagination or dream
    • be, nothing is said; the asperity of the imaginary partition is
    • usual imagining, feeling and willing intervenes already in such
    • of the soul who imagine that in the nerves an inner activity
    • produce the tracks that originate from imagining, feeling, and
    • something living. If one clusters imagining, feeling, willing
    • metamorphosis, as Goethe imagined the green leaves of the stalk
    • externally beside the feeling and the imagining, but the
    • imagining develops from feeling. At the end the anthroposophist
    • imagining the same is always mysteriously contained which is
    • Imaginations. They would like to experience it with the senses.
    • material. Knowledge has to become Imagination, so that in the
    • Imaginative experience which is as subtle as imagination, but
    • the feeling changes into imagining, the willing does it too. As
    • from imagining into the supersensible world.
    • soul being of imagining, one discovers in this willing which is
    • after such thought forms after which one imagines natural
  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture II: Anthroposophy Does not Disturb Any Religious Confession
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    • imagine, it is so cold that, actually, no human being can live
    • thunderstorms and the like; there they imagined that hostile
    • powers are there. Out of their fear, they imagined demoniacal
  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture III: What Spiritual Science Has to Say About the Eternal Aspect of the Human Soul and the Nature of Freedom
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    • assigned to it. This scientific imagination has the peculiarity
    • memory. This is a peculiarity of our usual imagining, which
    • usual human imagination — not in the supersensible
    • power of imagination if you do not want to get to fantastic
    • developed a ripe and versatile power of imagination, so that
    • the nervous system, namely only the imagining activity. So that
    • we can say, the whole imagining activity finds — we use
    • nervous system is the physical basis of the imagining activity,
    • these the emotional life is as real as the imagining activity.
    • pictures, but the emotional life develops beside the imagining
    • nervous life as the imagining activity refers to it, one
    • commits an error. Since as the imagining activity is directly
    • imagining activity seizes the nervous life. Does he not know
    • result of the imagining activity?
    • Thirdly, we have the will in our soul. As well as the imagining
    • example, in the nerves has nothing to do with imagining but
    • with the will process, which extends also into the imagining.
    • Of course, if I want to imagine anything, I will imagine it;
    • directing my attention upon the imagining is already a will
    • essentials of imagining are connected with processes which have
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  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture IV: The Science of the Supersensible and the Moral-Social Ideas
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    • drowns them only. This wake day life, the imagining, is as it
    • the imagining. Nevertheless, it lives in it in such a way as
    • Imaginative and Inspired knowledge, it penetrates into that
    • sense-perceptible. With the Imaginative knowledge, with the
    • today: to the Imaginative cognition of the beholding
    • just disintegrates into the Imaginative consciousness that is
    • consciously recognised with the Imaginative, Inspired, and
    • Imaginative consciousness. It must become catastrophic if one
    • to the Imaginative cognition must be direct.
    • understand history with the creative imagination of the people.
    • He said this because he still had no concepts of Imaginative
    • immerse them into the Imaginative cognition.
    • aesthetic-academically who cannot create out of Imagination.
    • Imaginative knowledge. That life which penetrates the social
    • that Imagination, that Inspiration can originate which can
    • imaginative-warlike; so that the peoples who have future are
    • gifted with Imaginative fantasy life and with warlike impulses.
    • being with the supersensible human by Imagination, by
  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture V: The Activities of the Human Soul Forces and Their Connection with Man's Eternal Being
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    • death, he does not describe it out of imagination, but while he
    • colours, you need a mature imaginative power to be able to
  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture VI: Spiritual-Scientific Results about the Ideas of Immortality and the Social Life
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    • always awake between birth and death. Imagine hypothetically
    • interesting book about dream imagination by Johannes Volkelt
    • sensory observation and imagining.
    • Only concerning the sense perception and imagining, we are
    • reaches from the sense perception to imagining. You can
    • imagining again. What is between the ready action and the
    • essential just for this consideration: the way of imagining
    • faced it like his imagining life, on him like a second person
    • cannot only enliven the sensory life and the imagining life,
    • only by our sensory life and by our imagining life. When we
    • to imagine and ourselves. This distinction exists if the
    • — that one cannot look at it with scientific imagination;
    • work in it, then one can do this only with imagination. Herman
    • with imagination. However, with imagination one cannot grasp
    • the Imaginative consciousness, the Inspired consciousness, and
    • Imaginative knowledge. That is why the social attempts have
    • concepts like the scientific ones. From Imagination, from
    • have to be superseded by that which arises from Imagination for
    • in living Imaginations and is related to, but not the same
    • imagination and sensory percipience, but speaks to that which
  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture VII: The Nature of the Human Soul and the Nature of the Human Body
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    • solely considered imagining, feeling, willing, memory,
    • thinking, of imagining. One forms a quite wrong idea of
    • strengthening the imagining, the thinking. It concerns that we
    • projecting yourself in the imagining life in such a way that
    • you imagine solely, so that you find out internally how it is,
    • actually, if you only think, only imagine. It is completely
    • irrelevant what you imagine. It concerns only that —
    • imagining and this thinking in such a way that you dedicate
    • thought, if it is an imagination thought, if it is a thought
    • imagining. This is the first step that one knows that imagining
    • answer that question who has investigated the imagining and
    • tries to familiarise himself with the imagining life. One asks
    • himself, what imagines in the human being so that he imagines
    • from the so-called observation of imagining, but will feel
    • usual imagining. He can understand it only if he soars such an
    • imagining. On the other hand, this imagining is refined and
    • awakening appears to the strengthened or transformed imagining
    • imagining and thinking.
    • outside world. Thinking and imagining is nothing but a
    • that we could not have these pictures of imagining unless in
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  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture VIII: How Natural Sciences Justify the Supersensible Knowledge
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    • laws that, however, even if one imagined the ideal of this
    • imagining?
    • character is just that it suppresses the active imagining, at
    • the imagining activity at those cornerstones as it were.
    • it possible to develop such an inner soul activity of imagining
    • contemplative meditation to remaining in the imagining.
    • However, this imagining work must be in such a way that if the
    • an imagining activity gradually which is now really not only a
    • get to a mere imagining which is as powerful, as usually only
    • imagining, you can only compare this imagining to the usual
    • imagining.
    • With the new developed imagining life, you penetrate down, and
    • if you not only try to develop such imagining in yourself which
    • submerges with the developed imagining which does not appeal to
    • gets to the first force while he develops an imagining which is
    • side the imagining has to discharge into a region where it
    • that I have meant, while I showed that to the imagining which
  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture IX: How Does One Justify the Anthroposophical Psychology?
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    • which a big part of our contemporaries imagines. On the
    • one envigours the imagining with meditation as usually the
    • imagining with the outer percepts — so that it comes to
    • advances to such imagining which does not appeal to memory that
    • no longer useful due to the scientific imagining, without this
    • being attains the Imaginative consciousness in meditative way.
    • his imagining only, that he deals with pictures. You realise
    • that a development of imagining is necessary if the human being
    • realities and beings, he has to develop not only the imagining
    • but also the will. As we imagine in the usual consciousness,
    • is about the following: as the imagining is developed to the
    • Imaginative knowledge while one produces a certain relation to
    • observation, the imagining in. However, this is connected
    • cannot incorporate the same development impulses by imagining.
    • to change by inner imagining is because you can change
    • this way, to imagining. However, you can explain the imagining
    • thinking and imagining. These rhythms take place in the ongoing
    • you go over from non-imagining to imagining. This is
    • you get to know the nature of imagining this way, you can build
    • the bridge between imagining and awakening, you know that the
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  • Title: Freedom/Immortality/Social: Lecture X: Moral, Social Life and Religion from the Viewpoint of Anthroposophy
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    • in the area of physical laws, but this way of imagining leads
    • ascends from the Imaginative to the Inspired, to the Intuitive
    • imaginations arising from the force of love arouse the
    • regarded slavery as necessary, one has to imagine as
  • Title: Course for Priests: Lecture II
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    • feeling! One can hardly imagine that people who truthfully work
    • to imagine this ideal (not reading the Mass but meditating) but
    • congregation. I can easily imagine a congregation who relate
    • I can imagine that another way can be used, other than
  • Title: Course for Priests: Lecture III
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    • parts of the smallest organs in us. Just imagine the earth as a
    • imagination is in contrast to scientific knowledge much wiser,
    • imaginations of the heights and become more and more empathic,
    • regions and take the imagination of ancient times, where
    • lightening was the arrow of the Gods, as an imagination far
    • imaginations in the depths of our minds, enabling us to be the
  • Title: Course for Priests: Lecture IV
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    • of the Father God. As long as we stand in the imagination of
    • the Father God, the imagination is fulfilled so that we can
  • Title: The Experiences of Sleep and their Spiritual Background
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    • Understanding Sleep through Imagination, Inspiration, and Intuition.
    • Imaginative, Inspired, Intuitive Knowledge. By means of these special
    • seen by Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive Knowledge. For ordinary
    • at all in sleep. But now, with the advent of Imaginative Knowledge,
    • peepshow; but through Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive Knowledge
    • before you arising from Imaginative, Inspired and Intuitive
    • Imaginative Knowledge does nothing else than lift this reality into
    • accessible to Imaginative Knowledge, but require Inspired Knowledge
  • Title: Redemption of Thinking: Lecture I:
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    • Manichaeism, it did not imagine that as something that one can
    • I had to imagine bodily masses if I wanted to meditate on God
    • image: we imagine once, we would be immersed in the sea, and we
    • inside, and which one calls Imagination
    • What I called Imagination there delves into that which is above
    • Plotinism. Imagine that, actually, the human being is an
    • human being can gain to himself? Imagine that Augustine took
  • Title: Redemption of Thinking: Lecture II:
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    • the church with the most astute thinking. Imagine only what it
    • them if one imagines the following. The human being can
    • beings into the tenth sphere. While he imagines the earth
    • the Empyrean, to the tenth sphere. He imagines all that
    • universal intellect. Thomas imagines that the human being
  • Title: Redemption of Thinking: Lecture III:
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    • Thomas Aquinas still imagined that the soul worked on the
    • Duns Scotus cannot imagine that the active
    • only imagine that the human corporeality is something finished
    • Scotus cannot imagine like Thomas Aquinas that the whole body
    • perception. He could no longer imagine that only in the
    • others, while he still has the courage to imagine the world as
    • imagined, however, to be rooted in the being of the world.
    • one has to imagine Goethe's idea of art, and this Cistercian,
    • has to imagine the whole human body as the result of the
    • imagination. The ethical individualism originates this way as I
    • imagination, they become the force of spiritual
    • Now, you yourselves can imagine all that.
    • could also imagine that now again one says, yes, he has often
    • the world of ideas without imagining this world in unsubtle
  • Title: Reincarnation and Karma: Lecture I
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    • willed. We must imagine to ourselves: What should I actually have
    • is almost impossible to imagine a greater difference between two
  • Title: Reincarnation and Karma: Lecture II
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    • “I will imagine that the position from which I extricated
    • And let us imagine
    • hurt us badly. Then let us imagine that we had climbed on to the roof
    • question of what we imagine, for this changes and becomes
    • 1866, and imagine what may have taken place in his soul at that
    • lived in his soul at that time, but imagine that all he then
    • into the depths of his soul; then imagine how faded the feelings and
    • — but full of renunciation. It is easier to imagine on all
    • someone says: “But we may be simply imagining it all,”
    • imagine something in relation to our memories that never
    • can provide a criterion for distinguishing real imagination from
    • could be so vivid that one could even imagine lemonade so strongly
    • to try not only to imagine lemonade, but to quench his thirst with
    • purely imaginary lemonade! Then he would see that it cannot be done.
    • who says: “That may be imagination,” any more than we can
    • disprove theoretically what numerous people imagine they have
  • Title: Reincarnation and Karma: Lecture III
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    • we were to build up in thought a kind of imaginary human being,
    • connection by means of our own faculties; we endow this imaginary man
    • these incomprehensible happenings. We there imagine a man possessing
    • shortcomings or faculties. We imagine him as one who has quite
    • build up in thought an imaginary man who acts in the following
    • imaginary man who is guilty of or brings about all those things of
    • imagined such a man with the qualities referred to, he makes a very
    • of this imaginary thought-man accounts for this. If we steep
    • a way that the imaginary man whispers to us: This is something that
    • imaginary man described. But this imaginary man does not remain a
    • memory arises from the imaginary man we have created in thought, is
    • imaginary man in thought is simply a means of proving to us that this
    • transformation of the imaginary thought-man. This bitter-sweet or
  • Title: Reincarnation and Karma: Lecture IV
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    • clairvoyance and magical forces of will. And it continued to be so on
  • Title: Reincarnation and Karma: Lecture V
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    • believe?” It is senseless to imagine that an
    • passes through the Gate of Death, it is imagined — because no
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture II: The Ninefold Constitution of Man
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    • imagined, however, that what it is possible to say in a single lecture
    • world the Imaginative World — but “Imaginative” here
    • Imaginative world, Astral world, Elemental world, are interchangeable.
    • Imaginative world or the “Elemental” world in Rosicrucian
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture III: The Elemental World and the Heaven World. Waking Life, Sleep and Death.
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    • has deep significance for his whole make-up. Do not imagine that the
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture IV: The Descent to a New Birth
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    • can also be seen. But we must not imagine that these pictures are
    • But let it not be imagined that the human being has nothing to do
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture V: Mans Communal Life Between Death and a New Birth. Birth into the Physical World.
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    • the qualities of phantasy or imagination, of thinking. The latter
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture VI: The Law of Destiny
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    • different way from what people like to imagine. Many people deplore
    • produce quite different effects. Imagine a people which was composed
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture VII: The Technique of Karma
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    • It is often imagined that the human being is subject to the
    • make new entries in the karmic book of life. It must never be imagined
    • wisdom. Do not imagine that the astral body of man today is as far
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture VIII: Human Consciousness in the Seven Planetary Conditions
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    • Steiner Imagination.] a consciousness in which one has both
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture IX: Planetary Evolution I
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    • now imagine that the human being has died, that even his etheric body
    • Imagine yourself standing before a mirror from which your own figure
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture X: Planetary Evolution II
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    • Now we must imagine that this Sun-existence passed through a kind of
    • We will now imagine that the Sun has passed through such a condition
    • less this substance if you imagine the white of a hen's egg, somewhat
    • the truth. Only through pictures, through imagination do we find the
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture XI: Evolution of Mankind on the Earth I
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    • never imagine that the human being was ever such an animal as those
    • longer the case, but there still continued a magical connection
    • will magically in such a way that the fire-masses became fierce and
    • That magical influence which the human beings had upon the Fire-ocean,
    • possessed a certain magical power over the growth of plants. If he
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture XII: Evolution of Mankind on the Earth II
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    • condition. Thus without being a magician one learns to grasp the world
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture XIII: The Future of Man
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    • heavily in people's minds. It is so easy to imagine that it is a
    • brotherhood, the expression of universal human love. One might imagine
    • age this moulding is unimaginably slow, but a time will come again
    • transform it. Many people cannot imagine that there will ever be a
    • imagine the man who is able to create his own likeness through the
  • Title: Theosophy/Rosicrucian: Lecture XIV: The Nature of Initiation
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    • develop quite definite feelings. Imagine the following: the plant
    • 2. Imaginative knowledge.
    • The second stage is Imaginative Knowledge, the knowledge which
    • is the basis, it must be perfected through individual imaginative
    • to exercise any deep influence on your organism. Imaginative knowledge
    • body. All imaginative knowledge based on truth is at the same time
    • circulation. The best educator is imaginative knowledge, if man is
    • through the imagination. One learns to discover an inner connection
    • leads to genuine brotherliness, this is the magician which can best
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement (1938): Lecture III: Critical Judgment and Colour of the Times
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    • room where they then turned up as magic documents; and other
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement (1938): Lecture IV: Blavatsky's Orientation: Spiritual, but Anti-Christian
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    • the ‘Magian Society’? And then they hunted up what other words
    • would begin. Pictorial, — speaking to the imagination,
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement (1938): Lecture VI: The Two First Periods of the Anthroposophic Movement
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    • upon one out of the air; they take shape magically, and flutter
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement (1938): Lecture VII: The Third Stage: The Present Day. - Life-Conditions of the Anthroposophical Society
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    • effect that — as I said — one must never imagine
    • imagine that it will do to pass over such things lightly and
    • make Anthroposophy spiritualistic, and they imagined that they
    • course, imagine that one is required to do anything so
  • Title: Anthroposophic Movement (1938): Lecture VIII: Conclusions: The Anthroposophical Society and its Future Conduct.
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    • imagine quite different conditions, to one perhaps in the
  • Title: Turning Points: Lecture 2: Hermes
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    • forth, as if by magic, that life brought thereto by the deposits
    • We can well imagine that the feelings of the old
  • Title: Turning Points: Lecture 4: Moses
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    • resembles that of the animal kingdom. We must first imagine that
  • Title: Turning Points: Lecture 5: Elijah
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    • him. In this case, you must not, however, imagine to yourselves
    • the exercise of any kind of magic.
    • such an example before us, we need no longer imagine that the
  • Title: Turning Points: Lecture 6: Christ and the Twentieth Century
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    • If we imagine an experience of the above kind as
    • is to be regarded not as a reality, but as a kind of imaginary
  • Title: On the Fifth Gospel: Lecture IX
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    • you have abased the others that you imagine yourselves to
  • Title: First Class, Vol. I: Lesson 2
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    • pre-earthly existence. Just as you imagine, dear friends, that
    • human figure. You must imagine this related to thinking. A
  • Title: First Class, Vol. I: Lesson 3
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    • Just imagine, my dear friends, that you were to go through life
    • being real or merely a dream. Just imagine what insecurity,
    • merely an imagined chair. The chair itself provides proof of
  • Title: First Class, Vol. I: Lesson 5
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    • magical being. What does it mean, that nature must be able to
    • beings are in the light. One must imagine that in this
  • Title: First Class, Vol. I: Lesson 6
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    • Imagine, my dear friends, a very vivid nightmare and consider
    • advances to Imaginative life, he feels exactly this
    • Then, when we have advanced to Imaginative life, we are able to
    • foreign to us. But if, through Imaginative knowledge, one
    • soon as we enter the elemental world with Imagination, we feel
    • individual who has advanced to Imagination no longer believes
    • Whoever does not know “Imagination” does not
    • those who have advanced to Imagination, thinking is a hushed
    • Imagination, and his thoughts are no longer abstractions, but
    • Imagination, really integrates with this cosmic chemistry, it
    • explained. If it is awakened through Imaginative knowledge, we
  • Title: First Class, Vol. I: Lesson 7
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    • Just imagine, my sisters and brothers, that you say to
    • Imagine, my dear sisters and brothers, you say the second time:
    • imagine you say the third time: I recognize that I need three
  • Title: First Class, Vol. I: Lesson 8
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    • This imagination must gradually stand before you, my dear
    • friends, this imagination of dead thinking directed toward the
    • imaginative consciousness.
    • at the human heart as the physical imaginative representative
    • thinking appears as a magical being of will that transplants
    • as the magical essence of will.
    • conjures, that is, it acts magically on the invisible thinking
    • we are sleeping in the will - acts magically in the limbs as
    • will. And only by seeing as magical the thoughts which pass
    • through the arms and hands, through legs and toes is true magic
    • magical being of will” underlined.]
    • as the magical essence of will.
    • magically from out of the universe into man.
    • as magical being of will.
  • Title: First Class, Vol. I: Lesson 9
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    • your souls. Imagine that you have achieved it, that in thought
  • Title: First Class, Vol. II: Lesson 10
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    • it becomes a plenitude of imaginations. You know the old
    • imaginations which fill universal space — albeit somewhat
    • far greater thoughtfulness we can imagine ourselves into the
    • becomes an Imagination for us. But only then, when the
    • star-filled sky becomes an Imagination for us, do we feel
    • universe on which the imaginative secrets of cosmic being are
    • the end of which we can feel the cosmic Imaginations by means
    • within the imaginative cosmic web. If we can accomplish this,
    • Imaginations.
    • imaginations for us in the cosmos — when we arrive we see
    • the imaginations from the other side [arrows]. At first we live
    • the cosmic imaginations [outer wave-circle].
    • imaginations, read them from the other side, the spiritual
    • to imagine that someone is speaking to you from a spiritual
    • imagine that another being is speaking to you from an unknown
    • use it correctly. Imagine yourself vividly in this meditating
    • Now imagine
    • vividly imagine what from the spirit resounds:
    • with that inner magical feeling, which is necessary for the
    • prevail. We may call it a magical feeling for it cannot be
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  • Title: First Class, Vol. II: Lesson 11
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    • activity on earth: our thinking. And so we must imagine:
    • periphery. Thus we imagine that we hear it from cosmic
    • Therefore we must imagine that just as the sublimity of
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    • spiritual world is mostly mistakenly imagined, because one
    • seen through the senses. This imaginative-super-sensible
    • partly must be imagined as resounding to us from out of the
    • speaking, but where we inwardly meditate hearing. We imagine
    • mind, the soul should imagine itself as being perfectly silent.
    • But the soul should also imagine itself to already be on the
    • [mind] can be achieved by imagining a definite image, this
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    • By means of this verse we imagine how at
    • ranks of the Archai. So we should imagine this mantric verse
    • hierarchies speaking to us, if we can vividly imagine it as
    • Imagine yourself walking, and perhaps moving your
    • Imagine the following [drawing]: these are human legs
    • if we imagine the situation thus:
    • Then we imagine [drawing] interweaving clouds
    • symbolizing the Thrones. And in that we imagine these
    • Now we imagine lightning [red] flashing through the
    • Now we imagine the entire sky above the lightning
    • So imagine, my dear sisters and brothers, that you
  • Title: First Class, Vol. II: Lesson 14
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    • Imagine that we have already flown over the abyss. We
    • Imagine it vividly, my dear sisters and brothers. The
    • So let us imagine, my dear sisters and brothers, that you are
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    • Therefore, let us imagine that we are already in the
    • Ahriman. In meditation we must imagine ourselves in this
    • the magical force of the Guardian's voice, must resound
    • Therefore, we are to imagine the mantras which the
    • the Archangeloi and the Archai with magical force.
    • our dedication to the cosmos, through the magical words of
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    • in meditation we imagine the being standing at the abyss of
    • Let us imagine it once more, for we cannot
    • in imaginative thoughts.  At first these imaginative
    • meditation with which we were to imagine how the Guardian
    • Therefore, we are to imagine that when we hear
    • imagine it in meditation:
  • Title: First Class, Vol. II: Lesson 17
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    • imagination, something tremendously majestic which the person,
    • becomes magically illuminated by the cloud formations and the
    • within the universe like a mighty imagination.
    • If we can imagine
    • our imagination more profound through meditation, if we wish
    • When we look back from out there, if you imagine that you go
    • This is the imagination which the Guardian first
    • What so magically appears
    • spiritual-inner meaning. And the magical ether-rainbow cannot be
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    • from the spiritual world. Let us imagine a
  • Title: First Class, Vol. II: Lesson 19
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    • pictures of the imaginative ritual at the beginning of the
    • the imaginative ritual revelations of the beginning of the
    • imaginative ritual brought down at the beginning of the
  • Title: First Class Lessons: Lesson XX (recapitulation)
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    • in imaginations. We direct our gaze to the distance. Something
    • his astral body is in that world that with imaginative gaze now
  • Title: First Class Lessons: Lesson XXI (recapitulation)
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    • as imaginations. There this willing, this feeling, this
    • pictures. We imagine ourselves in front of a corpse which has
  • Title: First Class Lessons: Lesson XXIV (recapitulation)
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    • earth and the air in thought and imagine ourselves wanting to
  • Title: First Class Lessons: Lesson XXV (recapitulation)
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    • experience in imaginative pictures.
  • Title: First Class Lessons: Lesson XXVI (recapitulation)
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    • tells us, and imagine dead thinking being cast out into the
    • to hear him: Now imagine that you are observing that figure on
    • look into the darkness and try with all your inner imaginative
    • enchanting, magical way. That is the truly magical effect of
    • thinking on the will. It is magic. Now we become aware of it.
    • As the magical essence of will.
    • As the magical essence of will.
    • we imagine that the Guardian of the Threshold again points to
    • imagine this picture: the earth [A white arc is drawn.]
    • are given the number III.] We imagine: how the earth's
    • As the magical essence of will.
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    • the so-called, imaginative knowledge, inspirative knowledge and
    • imaginative, inspirative and intuitive perceptions, should not
    • nature in general which are accessible to the imaginative
    • imaginative-knowledge is that everything which we are
    • I may express myself in detail I must say: To the imaginative
    • in the imagination are forces) that by passing over into the
    • above-mentioned imaginations.
    • above mentioned imaginations.
    • how do we experience through imaginative knowledge the moment
    • again compare this Imagination with external Nature) in which
    • be imagined. For Constantine had a far, far stronger army than
    • not imagine that there must be a difference between an etheric
    • different from what people imagined it to be. Thus, we see how
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture I
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    • materialistically-minded imagine that the whole of Nature works
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture II
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    • reinforced by that of Mercury and Venus. Thus, if we imagine
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture III
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    • cosmic prototypes, the great world-imaginations from which
    • ghost imaginable, for it copies in exact detail the solid shape
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture IV
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    • bark. Now imagine (although, of course, this does not happen in
    • imagine an organic entity possessing these two sets of forces,
    • as dung is permeated with these forces. Imagine now: we take
    • work is entailed in this. Besides I can very well imagine that
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture V
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    • Moreover, I pointed out yesterday how we can imagine the
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture VI
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    • I want you to imagine that
    • let us imagine the following. We catch a fairly young
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture VII
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    • matted mass or pap of roots. You can well imagine that this pap
  • Title: Agriculture Course (1938): Lecture VIII
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    • Imagine an animal standing in a dark and stuffy stable before
    • imagine someone saying to himself: “I must give roots to
  • Title: Anthroposophical Ethics (1928): Anthroposophical Ethics II
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    • You must not, however, imagine that the whole population of
    • human soul — with the exception of black magicians, with whom
  • Title: Anthroposophical Ethics (1928): Anthroposophical Ethics III
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    • than by our imagining this individual active among us, and by thinking
  • Title: Cosmogony/Freedom/Altruism: Lecture I: Social Impulses for the Healing of Modern Civilization
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    • lives and works for the rest. But just imagine in our present
    • forces of decline and fall, and one must not imagine that one
    • consists in the conversion of an imaginary world into a real
    • essence a fictitious reality, something imaginary, — not
    • something one imagines, but something that is imaginary. It is
  • Title: Cosmogony/Freedom/Altruism: Lecture III: Fundamental Impulses in History
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    • concepts, and bringing them back to the moral imagination, to
  • Title: Impulses of Utility: Lecture I: Western and Eastern Culture, H. P. Blavatsky
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    • flowed the relics of an ancient Atlantean Mystery magic. We
    • magic which sent its rays and streams from Asia throughout
  • Title: Impulses of Utility: Lecture II: Utilitarianism and Sacramentalism
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    • become possible for free spiritual Imaginations to arise in the
    • Imaginations.
  • Title: Toward Imagination: Lecture 1: The Immortality of the I
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    • Toward Imagination
    • it and was the most ardent social democrat you can imagine. One of the
    • impression of it, without having mentally digested it. As you can imagine,
    • interesting phenomenon! But just imagine: Bahr has now reached the age
    • eyes, and with bowed head imagined a flower in the center of my
    • out of it. They were not natural flowers, but imaginary ones, yet
    • faded nor grew stronger. I could produce the same thing by imagining
    • imagination, concept and idea are all at work at once, manifesting
    • clergyman who was able to call forth an image in his imagination that
    • of a sick imagination, a historical phenomenon it will take future
  • Title: Toward Imagination: Lecture 2: Blood and Nerves
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    • Toward Imagination
    • feature is my attempt to give at least a preliminary sketch of the imaginative
  • Title: Toward Imagination: Lecture 3: The Twelve Human Senses
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    • Toward Imagination
    • of speech, thinking, and the I. He knows nothing about them. Imagine,
    • not imagine either the one pillar or the other to be a basic force for
    • there these days. It is one of the most awful contrasts you can imagine.
    • when we speak. Just imagine that! A motor that runs on the waves we
    • quietly with an almost magical power in a region beyond nationalities
    • to take part in their magic.
    • and Franz with him, imagined this circle to be a community of Rabbis
    • man; imagine, he is a Catholic canon, and yet he has invited a Jewish
    • even the dash of superstition, magic, or whatever you want to call
    • Imagine, a Catholic canon writing the resolutions
    • behaves in such a way that he gets another thrashing; and imagine, when
    • can imagine what this means in poor old Salzburg! The people believed
  • Title: Toward Imagination: Lecture 4: The Human Organism Through the Incarnations
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    • Toward Imagination
    • animal form, is actually an imaginative representation of our physical
    • they became upright. Such figures or imaginations, which are preserved
    • of the profound wisdom in such imaginations. Let us recapitulate briefly:
    • could still be changed and undergo transformations and imagine you exposed
    • like that. Nothing is as damaging to our cause as being mistaken for
  • Title: Toward Imagination: Lecture 5: Balance in Life
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    • Toward Imagination
    • And thou?” Just imagine, these are profound and powerful questions
    • and so on. Imagine the hiker wandered for an hour, maybe, or an hour
  • Title: Toward Imagination: Lecture 6: The Feeling For Truth
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    • Toward Imagination
    • are representations of what belongs to imaginative knowledge, we can
    • They imagine this compensates for the superficiality and dishonesty
    • of the very worst kind imaginable, quite apart from its point of view.
    • by what we imagine. Obviously, everybody thinks his or her own method
  • Title: Toward Imagination: Lecture 7: Toward Imagination
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    • Toward Imagination
    • Toward Imagination
    • this today. Let's imagine we are looking at a house built out of bricks.
    • imagine we had not just rolls of plain paper, but inside each roll a
    • by themselves. Of course, you can't imagine they could do this by themselves;
    • nobody can imagine it. But let's suppose because the pictures are painted
    • we possess as Imaginations of spiritual reality; otherwise we will never
    • fiction, products of the fertile, unbridled Oriental imagination.
    • Imagine a person living in Rome at the time
    • to imagine that a person who takes in spiritual science in a living
  • Title: Social Life: Lecture I
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    • natural world and the moral sphere, cannot imagine how what we
    • That is Imagination. Imagination must enter. (See Diagram)
    • Imaginations as we call them in Spiritual Science, can alone
    • have called Imagination. Imaginations must permeate the social
  • Title: Social Life: Lecture II
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    • imagine to-day, any external activity is the result of a
    • theory, of a programme; one must not imagine that what we
    • usually imagined to-day.
    • People imagine they are free, but all the time, because freedom
  • Title: Social Life: Lecture III
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    • must not imagine that the reflection of the Universe which we
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture I: Concerning the World Situation
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    • consciously; people imagine they are talking about the issues,
    • so, but one can imagine his having pounded the table every so
    • amounts to giving them the most abstract arithmetic imaginable.
    • Imagine, the man stands before his audience and speaks to them
    • imagine, had been building up for several days. The conditions
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture II: Illnesses Occurring in the Different Periods of Life
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    • affect adults. It is extremely damaging; the children cannot
    • imagine this case. (See drawing.) Here is the child's heart,
    • second teeth. Imagine having to do that yourself! You would
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture III: The Formation of the Human Ear
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    • foot. What is the purpose of all this? Well, imagine that a
    • things are really like this. Imagine that nothing but what I
    • Imagine that you have heard someone say, “Five
    • themselves, not just one, but we may still imagine there
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture IV: The Thyroid Gland and Hormones
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    • nourish the minute hormonal glands, which, as you can imagine,
    • it becomes difficult to check for any damaging after
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture V: The Eye; Colour of the Hair
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    • physical apparatus. What is it for? Well, imagine that a man is
    • Imagine that a man shows you a small photograph of
    • imagine that the larynx is not like it is in humans but that it
    • at all. We can see because it does not do so. Just imagine,
    • illumines its interior. What does this mean? Well, imagine that
    • outside. This is how the eye works. Just imagine that it is a
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture VI: The Nose, Smell, and Taste
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    • Imagine now that you had to point out the difference between
    • nose. Imagine how delicate one's sense of discernment in the
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture VII: Spiritual-Scientific Foundations for a True Physiology
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    • peels, so you can imagine how small they are.
    • blossoms within our skull. You may imagine, then, that in
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture VIII: Concerning the Soul Life in the Breathing Process
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    • delicate process. Just imagine that today you have a tiny bit
    • examine something else connected with this. Imagine that
    • imagine how hard it would be if you had to live with the earth!
    • imagine that you had to grab yourself by the hair and
    • process. The earth is not damaging for us only because we
  • Title: Health and Illness I: Lecture IX: Why do We Become Sick?
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    • imagine that you are near a person who is sick with flu, and
    • Imagine that you have a piece of ground where you plant various
    • Something that should not evaporate does, and this is damaging
  • Title: East and West, and the Roman Church: Lecture I
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    • world which had its starting-point in an Imagination, Inspiration
  • Title: Fundamental Impulses in the Mysteries of Ancient and Modern Times
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    • is quite possible of course to imagine elderly people going
    • us imagine the centre of destruction in man. It spreads over
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture I: Fever Versus Shock; Pregnancy
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    • one's own opinion, is only a figment of their imagination. In
    • just your imagination, it is a real emotional slap to her. What
    • results of such experiments can reach much further. Imagine a
    • she imagines, feels, and wills.
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture II: The Brain and Thinking
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    • science for one to work with indications. Now, imagine that
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture III: The Effects of Alcohol on Man
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    • thousands of mice that he merely imagined all around
    • imagination, however, and so he thinks, “If this egg had
    • imagines, “Why, I, who have a whole hen to eat, am really
    • a rich fellow!” But his imagination is not satisfied
    • imagines snakes emerging everywhere from his body. First, such
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture IV: The Power of Intelligence as the Effect of the Sun; Beaver Lodges and Wasps Nests
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    • Imagine how ingenious this is! As you know, water only freezes
    • This is the story, then, with wasps. You can imagine that wasps
    • male dies. Such is the case with some spiders. Just imagine,
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture V: The Effect of Nicotine; Vegetarian and Meat Diets; On Taking Absinthe; Twin Births
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    • brought forth green leaves, berries, and so forth. Imagine a
    • imagine that an ox suddenly decided that it was too tiresome to
    • matters out. For this reason, absinthe is more damaging than
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture VI: Diphtheria and Influenza; Crossed Eyes
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    • Imagine, if conception occurs during the period when such a
    • imagine what a tremendous influence the air has on the living
    • covered with skin. Now imagine that this creature does not live
    • an operation, those who imagine themselves to be real medical
    • called an idiot. As you can imagine, I naturally tried in some
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture VII: The Relationship Between the Breathing and the Circulation of the Blood; Jaundice; Smallpox; Rabies
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    • imagine that the liver malfunctions. When this happens, all the
    • smallpox. Imagine that a person is bitten by a rabid dog or
    • Now, imagine for a moment that I were to breathe nitrogen
    • faster rhythms of breathing and blood circulation. Just imagine
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture VIII: The Effect of Absinthe; Hemophilia;The Ice Age; The Declining Oriental and the Rising European Cultures; On Bees
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    • Imagine, for example, a person who is employed in an office and
    • imagine another person who also works in the office, but this
    • Imagine that I observe a human heart today. This human heart
    • and you can imagine how wise that must be. I have described
  • Title: Health and Illness II: Lecture IX: The Relationship of the Planets to the Metals and their Healing Effects
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    • influences. Otherwise one imagines the great universal
    • form. But imagine that I were to draw this plant in detail,
  • Title: Jacob Boehme
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    • the greatest imaginable dissemination — the
    • greatest imaginable dissemination we may say, considering the
    • imaginative cognition. We have emphasized the fact that he who
    • perceives a new world of pictures, of imaginations. And we have
    • imaginations, but that pictures, imaginative conceptions,
    • completely this first flashing up of an imaginative world in
    • luminous, imaginative world resulted from this unceasing
    • imaginatively cognizant person, but we must say that he
    • height of imaginative cognition. It is to be assumed,
    • naturally, that such an imaginative force was in his soul. In
    • other words, he arrived at imaginative cognition by just the
    • imaginatively cognizant human being. But this imaginative
    • that only when that which appears as imaginations and an
    • imaginative world has been suppressed, extinguished, and then
    • this second imaginative world have value. (As I said, I beg you
  • Title: The Subconscious Forces
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    • should therefore imagine that the Folk Soul soars above that
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, VIII: Lecture II
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    • civilisation to a greater extent than is imagined. It is true, of
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, VIII: Lecture IV
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    • prejudices that make him imagine he cannot with healthy human
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture I
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    • to Imaginative Cognition — i.e. when we possess quite a new
    • imagination into the human being — we perceive that with man's
    • explained what nonsense it is to imagine that the light goes on and
    • point, and if you then imagine the diameter infinitely long the
    • imagine that one cannot understand what is revealed out of the
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture II
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    • have a balance. Imagine this vessel of water removed, to begin with.
    • once, as I have told you, the moment you rise to Imaginative
    • can very well imagine many a quality of animals, both large and
    • we can readily imagine: In a former life on earth we were with
    • a decisive meeting with another human being; if we imagine that we
    • imagine that the allotted time has run its course. You will not feel
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture III
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    • connection. He imagines that what wells forth in human Thinking is
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture IV
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    • imagine how man gathers his whole organisation together when he
    • another, out of hatred or antipathy. We can imagine every conceivable
    • preceding life? “I cannot possibly imagine,” man will be
    • caused me the greatest imaginable pain. For it is necessary to bring
    • unconscious; but you can well imagine a man who has an intimate
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture V
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    • in every imaginable way to convince the good lady that the idea was
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture VI
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    • We only imagine that we have a clear consciousness of our feelings;
    • imagine that it is so — that you go farther and farther
    • is indeed a naïve conception to imagine that memory works in
    • kind of symbolic diagram. Imagine the human being in the act of
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture VIII
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    • being, we imagine that it is justifiable to argue intellectually that
    • matter of apprehending the Imaginations which correspond to the
    • vision, that one lights upon the Imaginations which lead behind the
    • described. The Imagination of him, however, did not tally with the
    • imagine, it was very easy to be carried away by people one greatly
    • dark space. It is a fallacy to imagine that this was the work of a
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture IX
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    • like the breaking of a storm! You must imagine it shouted as it were
    • Imagination and Intuition, Eduard von Hartmann knew nothing; he did
    • live is the worst world imaginable. He carried his pessimism even
    • imaginative, writing in a graphic, vividly descriptive style. For
    • graphic and imaginative — are also to be found in The
    • we ponder this inwardly, with Imagination, then we are led back to an
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture X
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    • there been elaborated by oriental insight, oriental imagination,
    • over because we are too prone to imagine that a later earthly life
    • of the Fourteen Points. — With no great stretch of imagination
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture XI
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    • finds in teaching posts, a man at whose geometrical imagination and
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume I: Lecture XII
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    • from a plant and imagine that it can exist by itself. A single life
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture I
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    • him in the form of Imaginations, all that he bore within him from his
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture II
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    • are irritated, nay dreadfully so. It is a barren prospect to imagine
    • superficiality is needed to imagine that one understands all this.
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture III
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    • reveal the whole plant. Imagine a creature that is always born at a
    • the play of human imagination. In a man's ordinary imagination
    • imagination weaves in freedom; in the course of many earthly lives it
    • Thirty Years' War are imaginatively transformed in Conrad
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture IV
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    • For as you can well imagine, circumstances are not as they are on
    • personality, having steeped himself in Imaginations of the gods, had
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture V
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    • in imaginations, in pictures — as he must do before he can make
    • given definition by pictures and imaginations. But there is this
    • you go about with inner self-knowledge deepened through imagination,
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture VI
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    • live not merely within ourselves but within the other. Now imagine,
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture VII
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    • picture with its own substance. You can imagine that the picture
    • there is no spiritual exertion. We should not imagine, when something
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture VIII
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    • certainly seemed strange to those who imagine that they are standing
    • head of man is observed in the proper way only when Imaginative
    • the pattern of Imagination. It consists of outwardly visible
    • Imaginations.
    • we learn to know all there is to be learnt about Imaginative
    • we can apply, in the sense-world, Imaginative ideation, which is
    • with Imagination if we wish to look into the spiritual world. Then,
    • human head, there is nothing that is reminiscent of Imagination. But
    • mirror-image of the Imaginative.
    • of the head we have a sense-picture of Imagination, so we have
    • friends, you can say: A study of the head is an Imaginative
    • images for Intuition, Inspiration and Imagination. In a proper study
    • the head we can learn what Imaginative observation is in the
    • Imaginative, projected into the sense-world.
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture IX
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    • as a kind of magic, taking effect inasmuch as the influence of the
    • of action that we should now call magical. But in point of fact the
    • near him and with their ancient magical powers they pass into him,
    • and the picture were permeated with some magic power causing these
    • (Imagination as a World-Building Principle). I have often mentioned
    • only imagination. He said: imagination is working everywhere;
    • the plants grow, the animals exist and so forth, through imagination.
    • quite clearly in myself. As you may imagine, I took an extraordinary
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture X
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    • man's life of phantasy and imagination is common knowledge. And
    • that the ‘magic of moonlight’ — to use a romantic
    • impossible to imagine that even this crudest and most obvious
    • inhuman that he wished ill to all men. Let us imagine him to have
    • hypothetically at any rate we will imagine him to have been an
    • natural laws in which magic is operating and which are governed by
    • the spirit. These Beings understand magic; but of natural laws they
  • Title: Karmic Relationships, Volume II: Lecture XII
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    • Imaginative Knowledge, he is able to perceive everything that can be
    • Imaginative Consciousness on the path of Initiation, life can be
    • the Imaginations are suppressed and the pictures of the events of
    • looking down at the clouds. And now imagine that you are looking, not
    • was connected with t