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    Query was: greek
  

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 1
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • according to the ancient Greeks it was Hermes who brought down the
    • later form. The ancient Greek partly felt that in his own time the
    • human nature. And then this ancient Greek said to himself: ‘In
    • which the ancient Greek associated with the names of Agamemnon,
    • inattentive to notice them. The ancient Greek did notice that this
    • traced back, as the ancient Greek understood it, to Agamemnon,
    • of Agamemnon — one of those Heroes to whom the ancient Greek
    • whereby, according to Greek sentiment, the forces of Demeter in the
    • Greeks felt.
    • ancient Greeks was the origin of all theosophy, all philosophy
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 2
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • I tried to give you some idea of the way the Greeks thought about the
    • special emphasis upon two things. I said the Greeks were conscious
    • times, the same living Beings who lay hid behind the figures of Greek
    • goes into Greek mythology, the greater is one's respect,
    • thing. I said yesterday that Greek mythology draws attention to two
    • does Greek mythology express this profound truth? We know that modern
    • connection. But Greek mythology traces the ancestry of Agamemnon back
    • According to the Greek legend Tantalus wantonly offered his own son
    • of Agamemnon, Menelaus and Odysseus. Thus every item of Greek
    • of Nature as the female ruler of the wonders of Nature, the Greek
    • the depths of wisdom in Greek mythology.
    • what does it mean, when we apply what Greek mythology and the Mystery
    • represented as Pluto. According to Greek mythology Pluto is the ruler
    • of the underworld, of the interior of the earth. But the Greek was
    • of Greek mythology whom we associate with the kind of clairvoyant
    • densification of the human body. And when the ancient Greek feels the
    • how Greek mythology was dominated by the consciousness that man is a
    • within us. As the forces represented in Greek mythology by Pluto are
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • a good deal upon the Mystery of Eleusis and upon Greek mythology, and
    • relation of man to the spiritual world, held by the Greeks. For in
    • all this the Greek attitude of heart and soul was very different from
    • ‘nature’ simply did not exist for Greek thought. You have
    • experience was unknown to the Greeks. When the Greek directed his eye
    • longer see in these things, as the Greeks did, the outer gestures,
    • divine-spiritual activity — was unknown to the Greeks. We shall
    • mechanics, he would say it was miraculous. The ancient Greek could
    • is diffused over the whole universe without is also in us. The Greek
    • Greek could not say what I say today about these things, because he
    • to express in up-to-date phraseology what the Greek felt, we must say
    • bring forth thought?’ For the ancient Greek it was a spiritual
    • get any idea, still less any sense of what the Greek soul experienced
    • what the ancient Greek pictured to himself as Zeus is the macrocosmic
    • snow. The man of today can find no word to cover what the Greek
    • the matter as a Greek would do, we should ask once more whether there
    • once more the Greek felt the answer, was conscious of the answer
    • present-day meteorology is a purely physical science. For the Greeks
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 4
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • outset of this course that the Greeks thought of the whole of Nature
    • Greek spiritual life. We see that we have to think of the microcosmic
    • controlling centre, as superpersonal, superhuman, we have what Greek
    • what the Greeks associated with Poseidon; if we think of the forces
    • Greeks associated with Pluto.
    • way the Greek had of experiencing the world and its wonders directly,
    • soul-forces which live in our ego. The way in which the Greeks looked
    • quote the Greek historian Herodotus. Once when the ancient Egyptians
    • individualities that the Greeks were referring to, when they spoke of
    • are next above man, the Angels. In the Greek period quite special
    • Greeks quite in the way I have expressed it, but it nevertheless
    • lived in their sensations and feelings. When a Greek turned to the
    • and inspire the earthly realm. When the ancient Greek felt what
    • Greek sense of one of the ‘wonders of the world’, and it
    • brings out very clearly that the Greek was far from gazing into space
    • globe. What then was Venus to the Greek soul? It was that region of
    • from the Earth to Venus. This longing which the Greek soul recognised
    • Venus. The Greek did not see just the physical planet, he saw
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 5
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • knows, Dionysos is one of the Greek gods, and the question must have
    • arisen in your minds as to the nature of the Greek gods in general. I
    • the higher hierarchies the ancient Greeks regarded their gods as
    • were less tightly drawn. That the Greeks were conscious of this
    • have. In fact, compared with the gods of Egypt or Persia, the Greek
    • standing-upon-its-own-feet of Greek civilisation which is so truly
    • was just because they were aware of this that the Greeks could depict
    • where in the ranks of the hierarchies the Greeks themselves placed
    • had failed to complete their Moon evolution and that the Greeks knew
    • men had to do. It follows from this that the Greeks knew quite well
    • The Greek attitude
    • later among the Greeks. Greek consciousness brings to maturity the
    • evolution on the Moon. But we are not told that the Greek gods
    • Greeks were certainly aware that in their own time the Beings of
    • earth. But those soul-individualities whom the Greeks regarded as
    • and that happened in the time of Atlantis! Just as in the Greek
    • them knowledge of a Luciferic, a superhuman nature, so in the Greek
    • Atlantean bodies. Thus we can say that the Greeks looked upon their
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 6
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • year's Cycle. I am referring to the world of the Greek gods and
    • Greek gods? The reason is that such a study can provide — as
    • today was quite unknown to the ancient Greek. If we call to mind what
    • today. What lit up in the soul of the ancient Greek, what was
    • enkindled in the spirit of this marvellous Greek civilisation when
    • express. This world of the Greek gods, in its wisdom-filled
    • structure, is actually the Greek reply to the question ‘What is
    • Greek response to the riddle of the world was not a law of nature as
    • of the Greek gods, we cannot help seeing the equivalent of our own
    • was reflected in the soul of the Greek when he tried to understand
    • Greek has concealed what we might call the inherent contradiction of
    • acquire his ego-consciousness, or in terms of the Greek mind, he
    • also was felt by the Greeks. They felt that the ego of man as it
    • in the language of Greek mythology the elder Dionysos was dismembered
    • another example of the unerring wisdom of Greek feeling for the true
    • built up Greek mythology did know it—said to himself:
    • suddenly confronted by it. But the ancient Greek felt this too. That
    • world-wonders in which the ancient Greek consciousness had placed
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 7
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • of Greek mythology, as the expression of an ancient wisdom, what in our
    • recognised, were already expressed in pictorial fashion in this Greek
    • The Greeks felt that
    • contrast between what the Greeks felt in their ideas about the upper
    • able to understand in this way was felt by the ancient Greek, and
    • soul.’ When the ancient Greek was directing his feeling upon
    • for Greek pupils of the Mysteries, as it is for modern mystics also.
    • Greek Mysteries needed to divest himself of all that he was able to
    • ancient Greeks acknowledged as the content of the holy Mysteries.
    • from the Greeks as to who their teachers were, that they were
    • to self-knowledge for the Greek Mysteries was to go out of himself.
    • Greek pupils directed their clairvoyant sight upon the figure of
    • discover in Greek mythology something extremely remarkable. We are
    • beautiful in a different sense from that in which the late Greek
    • The ancient Greek imagined that the present comeliness of the human
    • Greek consciousness—were and are momentous for what man has
    • the Greeks tells us, particularly in the epic tradition of its sagas
    • conscious that these two had been born again; so were the Greek
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 8
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • into human nature, and we also saw how the Greeks experienced these forces
    • still extant. My frequent references to Greek mythology have not at
    • moment when Saturn began to develop. Greek mythology indicates it by
    • making ancient Saturn or Cronos, as the Greeks called him, the
    • pupils of the Greek Mysteries, in that it was made clear to them:
    • consciousness.’ Then the Greek pupil became clear that he must
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 9
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • They are Beings who were encountered by the pupils of the Greek
    • If you studied the Greek philosopher Aristotle you would
    • ‘Aristotle was certainly very intelligent for a Greek, but
    • a kind of clothing. And if you look at what the figures of the Greek
    • Greek sculptors were conditioned to think of the auras of their
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 10
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • instance how the ancient Greeks got rid of this wonder in quite a
    • they saw in the figures of their gods. As soon as the Greek became
    • Beings of Greek mythology, his feeling of wonder transformed itself
    • compared with that of the Greeks, we think in a very different
    • scientific to the Greek way of explaining the world and calls it
    • Greek enlightenment to a stage suited to the prosaic intellectual
    • as true science as we today do of Greek mythology. The laws of
    • descendants to be as much a mythology as that of the Greeks, unless
    • ancient Greek outlook (more disposed as it was to fantasy) was such
    • Greek thoughts about their gods contained far more reality than the
    • ancient Greeks as a circle,
    • namely that the Greeks formed pictures of their gods out of fantasy,
    • creations of Greek knowledge were far more densely packed with true
    • the case of the Greek gods, this very thing would have made it
    • which prevailed in the Greek Mysteries, a wisdom which leads us to
    • Greek neophytes, the pupils of these Mysteries, were led on the one
    • Greek tragedy, Greek drama. The first dramas of Aeschylus, and in a
    • that Greek drama portrayed in miniature those tremendous sensations
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 1
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • according to the ancient Greeks it was Hermes who brought down the
    • later form. The ancient Greek partly felt that in his own time the
    • human nature. And then this ancient Greek said to himself: ‘In
    • which the ancient Greek associated with the names of Agamemnon,
    • inattentive to notice them. The ancient Greek did notice that this
    • traced back, as the ancient Greek understood it, to Agamemnon,
    • of Agamemnon — one of those Heroes to whom the ancient Greek
    • whereby, according to Greek sentiment, the forces of Demeter in the
    • Greeks felt.
    • ancient Greeks was the origin of all theosophy, all philosophy
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 2
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • I tried to give you some idea of the way the Greeks thought about the
    • special emphasis upon two things. I said the Greeks were conscious
    • times, the same living Beings who lay hid behind the figures of Greek
    • goes into Greek mythology, the greater is one's respect,
    • thing. I said yesterday that Greek mythology draws attention to two
    • does Greek mythology express this profound truth? We know that modern
    • connection. But Greek mythology traces the ancestry of Agamemnon back
    • According to the Greek legend Tantalus wantonly offered his own son
    • of Agamemnon, Menelaus and Odysseus. Thus every item of Greek
    • of Nature as the female ruler of the wonders of Nature, the Greek
    • the depths of wisdom in Greek mythology.
    • what does it mean, when we apply what Greek mythology and the Mystery
    • represented as Pluto. According to Greek mythology Pluto is the ruler
    • of the underworld, of the interior of the earth. But the Greek was
    • of Greek mythology whom we associate with the kind of clairvoyant
    • densification of the human body. And when the ancient Greek feels the
    • how Greek mythology was dominated by the consciousness that man is a
    • within us. As the forces represented in Greek mythology by Pluto are
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • a good deal upon the Mystery of Eleusis and upon Greek mythology, and
    • relation of man to the spiritual world, held by the Greeks. For in
    • all this the Greek attitude of heart and soul was very different from
    • ‘nature’ simply did not exist for Greek thought. You have
    • experience was unknown to the Greeks. When the Greek directed his eye
    • longer see in these things, as the Greeks did, the outer gestures,
    • divine-spiritual activity — was unknown to the Greeks. We shall
    • mechanics, he would say it was miraculous. The ancient Greek could
    • is diffused over the whole universe without is also in us. The Greek
    • Greek could not say what I say today about these things, because he
    • to express in up-to-date phraseology what the Greek felt, we must say
    • bring forth thought?’ For the ancient Greek it was a spiritual
    • get any idea, still less any sense of what the Greek soul experienced
    • what the ancient Greek pictured to himself as Zeus is the macrocosmic
    • snow. The man of today can find no word to cover what the Greek
    • the matter as a Greek would do, we should ask once more whether there
    • once more the Greek felt the answer, was conscious of the answer
    • present-day meteorology is a purely physical science. For the Greeks
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 4
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • outset of this course that the Greeks thought of the whole of Nature
    • Greek spiritual life. We see that we have to think of the microcosmic
    • controlling centre, as superpersonal, superhuman, we have what Greek
    • what the Greeks associated with Poseidon; if we think of the forces
    • Greeks associated with Pluto.
    • way the Greek had of experiencing the world and its wonders directly,
    • soul-forces which live in our ego. The way in which the Greeks looked
    • quote the Greek historian Herodotus. Once when the ancient Egyptians
    • individualities that the Greeks were referring to, when they spoke of
    • are next above man, the Angels. In the Greek period quite special
    • Greeks quite in the way I have expressed it, but it nevertheless
    • lived in their sensations and feelings. When a Greek turned to the
    • and inspire the earthly realm. When the ancient Greek felt what
    • Greek sense of one of the ‘wonders of the world’, and it
    • brings out very clearly that the Greek was far from gazing into space
    • globe. What then was Venus to the Greek soul? It was that region of
    • from the Earth to Venus. This longing which the Greek soul recognised
    • Venus. The Greek did not see just the physical planet, he saw
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 5
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • knows, Dionysos is one of the Greek gods, and the question must have
    • arisen in your minds as to the nature of the Greek gods in general. I
    • the higher hierarchies the ancient Greeks regarded their gods as
    • were less tightly drawn. That the Greeks were conscious of this
    • have. In fact, compared with the gods of Egypt or Persia, the Greek
    • standing-upon-its-own-feet of Greek civilisation which is so truly
    • was just because they were aware of this that the Greeks could depict
    • where in the ranks of the hierarchies the Greeks themselves placed
    • had failed to complete their Moon evolution and that the Greeks knew
    • men had to do. It follows from this that the Greeks knew quite well
    • The Greek attitude
    • later among the Greeks. Greek consciousness brings to maturity the
    • evolution on the Moon. But we are not told that the Greek gods
    • Greeks were certainly aware that in their own time the Beings of
    • earth. But those soul-individualities whom the Greeks regarded as
    • and that happened in the time of Atlantis! Just as in the Greek
    • them knowledge of a Luciferic, a superhuman nature, so in the Greek
    • Atlantean bodies. Thus we can say that the Greeks looked upon their
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 6
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • year's Cycle. I am referring to the world of the Greek gods and
    • Greek gods? The reason is that such a study can provide — as
    • today was quite unknown to the ancient Greek. If we call to mind what
    • today. What lit up in the soul of the ancient Greek, what was
    • enkindled in the spirit of this marvellous Greek civilisation when
    • express. This world of the Greek gods, in its wisdom-filled
    • structure, is actually the Greek reply to the question ‘What is
    • Greek response to the riddle of the world was not a law of nature as
    • of the Greek gods, we cannot help seeing the equivalent of our own
    • was reflected in the soul of the Greek when he tried to understand
    • Greek has concealed what we might call the inherent contradiction of
    • acquire his ego-consciousness, or in terms of the Greek mind, he
    • also was felt by the Greeks. They felt that the ego of man as it
    • in the language of Greek mythology the elder Dionysos was dismembered
    • another example of the unerring wisdom of Greek feeling for the true
    • built up Greek mythology did know it—said to himself:
    • suddenly confronted by it. But the ancient Greek felt this too. That
    • world-wonders in which the ancient Greek consciousness had placed
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 7
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • of Greek mythology, as the expression of an ancient wisdom, what in our
    • recognised, were already expressed in pictorial fashion in this Greek
    • The Greeks felt that
    • contrast between what the Greeks felt in their ideas about the upper
    • able to understand in this way was felt by the ancient Greek, and
    • soul.’ When the ancient Greek was directing his feeling upon
    • for Greek pupils of the Mysteries, as it is for modern mystics also.
    • Greek Mysteries needed to divest himself of all that he was able to
    • ancient Greeks acknowledged as the content of the holy Mysteries.
    • from the Greeks as to who their teachers were, that they were
    • to self-knowledge for the Greek Mysteries was to go out of himself.
    • Greek pupils directed their clairvoyant sight upon the figure of
    • discover in Greek mythology something extremely remarkable. We are
    • beautiful in a different sense from that in which the late Greek
    • The ancient Greek imagined that the present comeliness of the human
    • Greek consciousness—were and are momentous for what man has
    • the Greeks tells us, particularly in the epic tradition of its sagas
    • conscious that these two had been born again; so were the Greek
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 8
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • into human nature, and we also saw how the Greeks experienced these forces
    • still extant. My frequent references to Greek mythology have not at
    • moment when Saturn began to develop. Greek mythology indicates it by
    • making ancient Saturn or Cronos, as the Greeks called him, the
    • pupils of the Greek Mysteries, in that it was made clear to them:
    • consciousness.’ Then the Greek pupil became clear that he must
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 9
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • They are Beings who were encountered by the pupils of the Greek
    • If you studied the Greek philosopher Aristotle you would
    • ‘Aristotle was certainly very intelligent for a Greek, but
    • a kind of clothing. And if you look at what the figures of the Greek
    • Greek sculptors were conditioned to think of the auras of their
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 10
    Matching lines:
    • the Greeks and the deeds of their gods, as well as the Eleusinian and
    • due to the incarnation of Christ at the time of the Greek culture.
    • instance how the ancient Greeks got rid of this wonder in quite a
    • they saw in the figures of their gods. As soon as the Greek became
    • Beings of Greek mythology, his feeling of wonder transformed itself
    • compared with that of the Greeks, we think in a very different
    • scientific to the Greek way of explaining the world and calls it
    • Greek enlightenment to a stage suited to the prosaic intellectual
    • as true science as we today do of Greek mythology. The laws of
    • descendants to be as much a mythology as that of the Greeks, unless
    • ancient Greek outlook (more disposed as it was to fantasy) was such
    • Greek thoughts about their gods contained far more reality than the
    • ancient Greeks as a circle,
    • namely that the Greeks formed pictures of their gods out of fantasy,
    • creations of Greek knowledge were far more densely packed with true
    • the case of the Greek gods, this very thing would have made it
    • which prevailed in the Greek Mysteries, a wisdom which leads us to
    • Greek neophytes, the pupils of these Mysteries, were led on the one
    • Greek tragedy, Greek drama. The first dramas of Aeschylus, and in a
    • that Greek drama portrayed in miniature those tremendous sensations



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