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Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: On the Occasion of Goethe's Birthday
    Matching lines:
    • the soul; on the one hand the losing of itself in
    • himself. Goethe's personality is a striking example of the
    • scepticism towards all theorising shows itself precisely in
    • Darwinian theory, used in this way, has shown itself to be
    • it has contradicted and annulled itself! So that we may
    • sub-conscious life of man, as it shows itself in dreams or
    • makes itself felt, a kind of resignation sets in. In
    • a living spirit, in which the soul finds itself as if reborn
    • can be no clearer example of helping oneself out of a
    • forlornness, in which psychology finds itself bereft of the
    • spirit, and tries to help itself out of the difficulty by the
    • itself ever more intensely as it passes from soul to soul,
    • directly from life itself. In his “Atomistics of the
    • to emancipate itself from all theories — the atomic,
    • himself with the study of botany, zoology, osteology in
    • himself a proof that it is an absurdity to believe that the
    • particular, and, where he contradicts himself, it is not his
    • logic that is at fault. Life itself is a contradiction, and
    • something in him which works of itself. If we yield ourselves
    • he found himself outside in the midst of a wild snowstorm, so
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 1
    Matching lines:
    • life. That very concern itself was raised to the level of a religion,
    • powerful in its particular workings. It did not confine itself to a
    • and saw religious life pouring itself into the forms of art.
    • spiritual-scientifie development. When I myself judged that the time
    • cherishing an unselfish ideal. We can only form an opinion about what
    • we ask ourselves unselfishly what it is that Europeans have learnt to
    • human nature. And then this ancient Greek said to himself: ‘In
    • significance of Goethe's action in immersing himself in the
    • he himself felt to be the culmination of his art. When he wrote his
    • Iphigenia herself we meet gentleness and harmony, which do not hate
    • hidden guest, as a comrade in arms, has shown itself to be true by
    • Persephone in the human being himself. The name of Demeter points us
    • to your own hearts to judge of these compositions. I myself regard it
    • word he utters on the stage proceeds from himself. You will never see
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 2
    Matching lines:
    • of Eleusis thus express to the nature of man himself? What in terms
    • to himself, not in full consciousness, but as it were in the
    • unconscious, ‘I myself have done nothing, I have gone through
    • felt: ‘I absorb into myself the substance of the plant kingdom
    • him, which build up his body again. Atlantean man said to himself:
    • expressions of the wonders of Nature within man himself. They show us
    • to himself: ‘I gaze upwards to the great Demeter, and whenever
    • consciousness, but which was self-evident, impelling the soul. And it
    • to do with the ether body itself. Besides being the source
    • itself. In primeval times this ether body was so organised that the
    • been able to see them if it had depended upon itself alone. The
    • astral body does not of itself see images. Just as a man does not see
    • himself advancing unless a mirror confronts him, so the astral body
    • the third member, the astral body itself. This is the element in us
    • upon the ether body itself, and upon the astral body. This force of
    • therefore the nature of Demeter herself. These human etheric forces
    • which work upon the physical body, upon the ether body itself and
    • that in the ether body itself the key to knowledge of the world had
    • itself, is represented in the key and the coil of rope; and the third
    • when He shows Himself as He is among us now, as He has been since the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • this we must start with man himself, who so emphatically demands not
    • work in himself, and the forces active outside in the macrocosm;
    • rainbow without. That is what he experienced. And he said to himself:
    • what the ancient Greek pictured to himself as Zeus is the macrocosmic
    • ego-consciousness. Now when the Greek asked himself what it was,
    • has a self-knowledge which can properly distinguish this threefold
    • about the microcosm, about man himself, the centre of our own world,
    • of astringency, of downright pain; try to imagine yourself from top
    • by this astringent taste, then you have the self-knowledge which the
    • occultist calls the self-knowledge of the physical body through the
    • self-knowledge works in such a way that man feels himself completely
    • a taste which you can have when you can forget yourself in your own
    • inwardness, when you can feel yourself so united with your
    • surroundings that you would like to taste yourself into those
    • when he seeks the self-knowledge which is possible in respect of the
    • surrendering myself entirely to my permanent habits, to my sympathies
    • this, when as a practising occultist he feels himself in this etheric
    • Thus there is a clear distinction between self-knowledge in respect
    • relate his self-knowledge solely to his astral body — that is
    • suppressed, and self-knowledge is concentrated upon the astral body,
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 4
    Matching lines:
    • into the sphere of Zeus. But when we consider the ego itself, we find
    • seems to be self-sufficient. There has been no epoch of civilisation
    • expressing his own peculiar self as in the Greco-Latin time. Hence
    • nature of Christ Himself, but also the nature of another figure, of
    • substances, He does not since the Mystery of Golgotha unite Himself
    • not united itself with the Earth. To liberate men from the Earth, to
    • hosts are the hosts of Lucifer. Lucifer himself takes part in Earth
    • Lucifer was to the Earth, when he said to himself, as it were
    • said to himself: ‘The spiritual beings whom we revere as gods
    • substance would attach itself to form a star which in the future
    • Himself, and to annul the Mystery of Golgotha. He would then create a
    • would attach itself. There would then have to be other incarnations
    • upwards to a higher vision of Himself; on the other hand we see the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 5
    Matching lines:
    • Pluto, Poseidon and Zeus himself. In view of what I said yesterday as
    • Moon, how must this have affected its attitude towards man himself?
    • Jahve, as the extract of the Elohim, means life itself to the ancient
    • consciousness, the ancient Hebrew consciousness surrenders itself
    • which are also called laws. Try then to imagine to yourself a real
    • for him to conceive of the Being of Christ Jesus Himself. For if we
    • without, towards which he is focused, and he feels himself, together
    • himself, united with the beings of the surrounding world, whom
    • death has taken place, he at once feels himself to be poured out into
    • the macrocosm, he feels himself to be one with the macrocosm, because
    • gradually makes itself at home in the macrocosm. ... I tried to
    • himself whether everything out there in space has not been woven out
    • he has encountered there outside himself has been made out of the
    • stuff of his own soul. It is very strange to feel oneself to be part
    • figure of Dionysos the Greek soul has expressed itself with such
    • itself with the astral Zeus forces. Grafted upon the Zeus forces as
    • that was his very self. He was something only one aspect of which was
    • forces of the Earth itself. Persephone was the daughter of Demeter, a
    • something which Zeus can only look upon, but which he cannot himself
    • said to himself, ‘Our Earth can no longer maintain such an
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 6
    Matching lines:
    • the world, presented itself to them as a kind of knowledge, a kind of
    • self-contradictory element in the state of things, and today's
    • addresses itself not only to our reason, to our philosophy, but to
    • is utterly deceiving himself. With physical faculties for acquiring
    • body manifests itself only as maya or illusion. When we meet a man,
    • cloud, vanishes away, reveals itself as maya. And if we wish
    • taken into himself the denser matter, he would not have been able to
    • built up Greek mythology did know it—said to himself:
    • of the world which displays itself to him in the star-strewn heavens,
    • felt the self-contradiction in the external human form. He was not a
    • compromise, from no aspect does it show itself to be what in reality
    • moved by unutterable depth of feeling — even put to himself the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 7
    Matching lines:
    • thinking. Knowledge does not come of itself. The human being has to
    • undertake work within himself, he has to allow ideas to pass through
    • Nothing of the mental representation itself lives in the brain. What
    • for the man who sees himself in it. When you with your personality
    • move through space, you do not see yourself — unless you meet a
    • this activity may become evident to the human being himself, in order
    • mirror in which you see yourself.
    • therefore he said to himself: ‘There is concealed in this
    • attainment of knowledge as a matter of life itself, that one feels
    • recognise that the mighty word of wisdom ‘Know thyself’,
    • resounds towards us out of primeval times. Self-knowledge, as the
    • know oneself, one can come to know nothing but this process of
    • degree of self-knowledge.
    • man into himself. Anyone determined to recognise only exoteric
    • oneself understood. Today men try to confine everything within the
    • still so today. In order to come to his full self, in order to
    • his external bodily organisation, the pupil must divest himself of
    • ‘You want to make yourself understood by that professor; he
    • nonsense what, if it has held on to its common sense, reveals itself
    • Greek Mysteries needed to divest himself of all that he was able to
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 8
    Matching lines:
    • itself. Something like that is what Capesius is depicted as feeling
    • himself as a result of his premonitions, and then plunged deeply into
    • realise that it is no mere selfish yearning, but deep-seated duty
    • attitude here. On the contrary, Capesius says to himself: ‘You
    • brought upon yourself.’ Many men have a great longing to make
    • think himself as good as is his idea of a good man.
    • self-knowledge — not just superficial self-knowledge, but true
    • self-knowledge — when he really learns something of his inmost
    • being, then as a rule he discovers something in himself which he
    • thought of myself, I don't want anything for myself,’ and
    • so on. It may be that just when one is most self-seeking one puts on
    • a mask, one hides this fact from oneself by saying, ‘I want
    • nothing for myself.’ That is a common experience. But it is
    • better to acknowledge to oneself the truth, that at bottom even the
    • most unselfish actions are performed for our own sakes, for by
    • would work today if it were left to itself. The human being would
    • etheric currents, and here self-knowledge yields something very
    • send all this upwards from our heart and now, in real self-knowledge,
    • itself aloof, so to say, and only intervening indirectly. Now we must
    • idea of this if you first have a look at man himself. Take the human
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 9
    Matching lines:
    • The Earth itself was
    • oneself to the skeleton. What physical science describes is only a
    • continuously towards man out of the Earth itself. We will now examine
    • influence upon man himself, working into his formation as if from the
    • saying to himself: ‘Thou art I myself!’
    • himself, and upon other creatures, especially the bird creation. That
    • way that through self-knowledge they also arrived at the
    • itself into that Christpower, that Christ Impulse which, as it
    • detached Himself from the Sun in a body of air and not merely in an
    • ancient doctrine of Zarathustra, will one day have to say to itself:
    • possibility of permeating itself with that element out of cosmic
    • truth is that though Aristotle had not himself the clairvoyant
    • consciousness which enabled him to know it for himself, he knew from
    • brain is held back, it reflects itself, and what in this way enters
    • clairvoyance can advance still further and say to himself,
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 10
    Matching lines:
    • world, that the world presents itself to him as a riddle, and that
    • Beings of Greek mythology, his feeling of wonder transformed itself
    • instrument of the brain detaches from itself highly attenuated
    • that the human being let flow far more of his own self, far more of
    • this stuff itself derived from the depths of the cosmos, ancient
    • soul draws forth far less from itself, what it produces is much
    • feels itself empty in face of the real world. It certainly feels able
    • world’, along the lines of abstract science, finds himself at
    • fear of losing oneself in cosmic distances.
    • to enlarge oneself to become a world’, then we must say:
    • self-knowledge such as is given by esoteric training a man tries to
    • the generations he himself has experienced as impulses, desires,
    • activity which the man himself develops. The faculty of speech is
    • himself no predisposition to anything, but everything has been formed
    • which his ideas can attain, he himself can only come to
    • a man plunges into himself, into what has been built up during
    • observe it as it is in itself, and if this consciousness becomes
    • egotism; in either direction we come to what of itself can certainly
    • confidence that the human soul is meant to bear aloft her divine self
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 1
    Matching lines:
    • life. That very concern itself was raised to the level of a religion,
    • powerful in its particular workings. It did not confine itself to a
    • and saw religious life pouring itself into the forms of art.
    • spiritual-scientifie development. When I myself judged that the time
    • cherishing an unselfish ideal. We can only form an opinion about what
    • we ask ourselves unselfishly what it is that Europeans have learnt to
    • human nature. And then this ancient Greek said to himself: ‘In
    • significance of Goethe's action in immersing himself in the
    • he himself felt to be the culmination of his art. When he wrote his
    • Iphigenia herself we meet gentleness and harmony, which do not hate
    • hidden guest, as a comrade in arms, has shown itself to be true by
    • Persephone in the human being himself. The name of Demeter points us
    • to your own hearts to judge of these compositions. I myself regard it
    • word he utters on the stage proceeds from himself. You will never see
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 2
    Matching lines:
    • of Eleusis thus express to the nature of man himself? What in terms
    • to himself, not in full consciousness, but as it were in the
    • unconscious, ‘I myself have done nothing, I have gone through
    • felt: ‘I absorb into myself the substance of the plant kingdom
    • him, which build up his body again. Atlantean man said to himself:
    • expressions of the wonders of Nature within man himself. They show us
    • to himself: ‘I gaze upwards to the great Demeter, and whenever
    • consciousness, but which was self-evident, impelling the soul. And it
    • to do with the ether body itself. Besides being the source
    • itself. In primeval times this ether body was so organised that the
    • been able to see them if it had depended upon itself alone. The
    • astral body does not of itself see images. Just as a man does not see
    • himself advancing unless a mirror confronts him, so the astral body
    • the third member, the astral body itself. This is the element in us
    • upon the ether body itself, and upon the astral body. This force of
    • therefore the nature of Demeter herself. These human etheric forces
    • which work upon the physical body, upon the ether body itself and
    • that in the ether body itself the key to knowledge of the world had
    • itself, is represented in the key and the coil of rope; and the third
    • when He shows Himself as He is among us now, as He has been since the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • this we must start with man himself, who so emphatically demands not
    • work in himself, and the forces active outside in the macrocosm;
    • rainbow without. That is what he experienced. And he said to himself:
    • what the ancient Greek pictured to himself as Zeus is the macrocosmic
    • ego-consciousness. Now when the Greek asked himself what it was,
    • has a self-knowledge which can properly distinguish this threefold
    • about the microcosm, about man himself, the centre of our own world,
    • of astringency, of downright pain; try to imagine yourself from top
    • by this astringent taste, then you have the self-knowledge which the
    • occultist calls the self-knowledge of the physical body through the
    • self-knowledge works in such a way that man feels himself completely
    • a taste which you can have when you can forget yourself in your own
    • inwardness, when you can feel yourself so united with your
    • surroundings that you would like to taste yourself into those
    • when he seeks the self-knowledge which is possible in respect of the
    • surrendering myself entirely to my permanent habits, to my sympathies
    • this, when as a practising occultist he feels himself in this etheric
    • Thus there is a clear distinction between self-knowledge in respect
    • relate his self-knowledge solely to his astral body — that is
    • suppressed, and self-knowledge is concentrated upon the astral body,
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 4
    Matching lines:
    • into the sphere of Zeus. But when we consider the ego itself, we find
    • seems to be self-sufficient. There has been no epoch of civilisation
    • expressing his own peculiar self as in the Greco-Latin time. Hence
    • nature of Christ Himself, but also the nature of another figure, of
    • substances, He does not since the Mystery of Golgotha unite Himself
    • not united itself with the Earth. To liberate men from the Earth, to
    • hosts are the hosts of Lucifer. Lucifer himself takes part in Earth
    • Lucifer was to the Earth, when he said to himself, as it were
    • said to himself: ‘The spiritual beings whom we revere as gods
    • substance would attach itself to form a star which in the future
    • Himself, and to annul the Mystery of Golgotha. He would then create a
    • would attach itself. There would then have to be other incarnations
    • upwards to a higher vision of Himself; on the other hand we see the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 5
    Matching lines:
    • Pluto, Poseidon and Zeus himself. In view of what I said yesterday as
    • Moon, how must this have affected its attitude towards man himself?
    • Jahve, as the extract of the Elohim, means life itself to the ancient
    • consciousness, the ancient Hebrew consciousness surrenders itself
    • which are also called laws. Try then to imagine to yourself a real
    • for him to conceive of the Being of Christ Jesus Himself. For if we
    • without, towards which he is focused, and he feels himself, together
    • himself, united with the beings of the surrounding world, whom
    • death has taken place, he at once feels himself to be poured out into
    • the macrocosm, he feels himself to be one with the macrocosm, because
    • gradually makes itself at home in the macrocosm. ... I tried to
    • himself whether everything out there in space has not been woven out
    • he has encountered there outside himself has been made out of the
    • stuff of his own soul. It is very strange to feel oneself to be part
    • figure of Dionysos the Greek soul has expressed itself with such
    • itself with the astral Zeus forces. Grafted upon the Zeus forces as
    • that was his very self. He was something only one aspect of which was
    • forces of the Earth itself. Persephone was the daughter of Demeter, a
    • something which Zeus can only look upon, but which he cannot himself
    • said to himself, ‘Our Earth can no longer maintain such an
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 6
    Matching lines:
    • the world, presented itself to them as a kind of knowledge, a kind of
    • self-contradictory element in the state of things, and today's
    • addresses itself not only to our reason, to our philosophy, but to
    • is utterly deceiving himself. With physical faculties for acquiring
    • body manifests itself only as maya or illusion. When we meet a man,
    • cloud, vanishes away, reveals itself as maya. And if we wish
    • taken into himself the denser matter, he would not have been able to
    • built up Greek mythology did know it—said to himself:
    • of the world which displays itself to him in the star-strewn heavens,
    • felt the self-contradiction in the external human form. He was not a
    • compromise, from no aspect does it show itself to be what in reality
    • moved by unutterable depth of feeling — even put to himself the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 7
    Matching lines:
    • thinking. Knowledge does not come of itself. The human being has to
    • undertake work within himself, he has to allow ideas to pass through
    • Nothing of the mental representation itself lives in the brain. What
    • for the man who sees himself in it. When you with your personality
    • move through space, you do not see yourself — unless you meet a
    • this activity may become evident to the human being himself, in order
    • mirror in which you see yourself.
    • therefore he said to himself: ‘There is concealed in this
    • attainment of knowledge as a matter of life itself, that one feels
    • recognise that the mighty word of wisdom ‘Know thyself’,
    • resounds towards us out of primeval times. Self-knowledge, as the
    • know oneself, one can come to know nothing but this process of
    • degree of self-knowledge.
    • man into himself. Anyone determined to recognise only exoteric
    • oneself understood. Today men try to confine everything within the
    • still so today. In order to come to his full self, in order to
    • his external bodily organisation, the pupil must divest himself of
    • ‘You want to make yourself understood by that professor; he
    • nonsense what, if it has held on to its common sense, reveals itself
    • Greek Mysteries needed to divest himself of all that he was able to
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 8
    Matching lines:
    • itself. Something like that is what Capesius is depicted as feeling
    • himself as a result of his premonitions, and then plunged deeply into
    • realise that it is no mere selfish yearning, but deep-seated duty
    • attitude here. On the contrary, Capesius says to himself: ‘You
    • brought upon yourself.’ Many men have a great longing to make
    • think himself as good as is his idea of a good man.
    • self-knowledge — not just superficial self-knowledge, but true
    • self-knowledge — when he really learns something of his inmost
    • being, then as a rule he discovers something in himself which he
    • thought of myself, I don't want anything for myself,’ and
    • so on. It may be that just when one is most self-seeking one puts on
    • a mask, one hides this fact from oneself by saying, ‘I want
    • nothing for myself.’ That is a common experience. But it is
    • better to acknowledge to oneself the truth, that at bottom even the
    • most unselfish actions are performed for our own sakes, for by
    • would work today if it were left to itself. The human being would
    • etheric currents, and here self-knowledge yields something very
    • send all this upwards from our heart and now, in real self-knowledge,
    • itself aloof, so to say, and only intervening indirectly. Now we must
    • idea of this if you first have a look at man himself. Take the human
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 9
    Matching lines:
    • The Earth itself was
    • oneself to the skeleton. What physical science describes is only a
    • continuously towards man out of the Earth itself. We will now examine
    • influence upon man himself, working into his formation as if from the
    • saying to himself: ‘Thou art I myself!’
    • himself, and upon other creatures, especially the bird creation. That
    • way that through self-knowledge they also arrived at the
    • itself into that Christpower, that Christ Impulse which, as it
    • detached Himself from the Sun in a body of air and not merely in an
    • ancient doctrine of Zarathustra, will one day have to say to itself:
    • possibility of permeating itself with that element out of cosmic
    • truth is that though Aristotle had not himself the clairvoyant
    • consciousness which enabled him to know it for himself, he knew from
    • brain is held back, it reflects itself, and what in this way enters
    • clairvoyance can advance still further and say to himself,
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 10
    Matching lines:
    • world, that the world presents itself to him as a riddle, and that
    • Beings of Greek mythology, his feeling of wonder transformed itself
    • instrument of the brain detaches from itself highly attenuated
    • that the human being let flow far more of his own self, far more of
    • this stuff itself derived from the depths of the cosmos, ancient
    • soul draws forth far less from itself, what it produces is much
    • feels itself empty in face of the real world. It certainly feels able
    • world’, along the lines of abstract science, finds himself at
    • fear of losing oneself in cosmic distances.
    • to enlarge oneself to become a world’, then we must say:
    • self-knowledge such as is given by esoteric training a man tries to
    • the generations he himself has experienced as impulses, desires,
    • activity which the man himself develops. The faculty of speech is
    • himself no predisposition to anything, but everything has been formed
    • which his ideas can attain, he himself can only come to
    • a man plunges into himself, into what has been built up during
    • observe it as it is in itself, and if this consciousness becomes
    • egotism; in either direction we come to what of itself can certainly
    • confidence that the human soul is meant to bear aloft her divine self



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