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Searching Rudolf Steiner Lectures by GA number (GA0129)
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   Query type: 
    Query was: sense
  

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: On the Occasion of Goethe's Birthday
    Matching lines:
    • from his early years, on, one may say in the truest sense of
    • beings in the true sense of the word. When we pass in review
    • remarkable achievement (in the most limited sense of the
    • empirical facts of the outer senses be traced to spiritual
    • from entities, is devoid of all sense. Not until active life
    • particular, also with anthropology in a wider sense; further
    • look upon Goethe's ideas regarding colour as nonsense; this
    • scientific in the truest sense, and, compared with which, all
    • sense, with Goethe's life, — but to consider the
    • discussions in our sense of the word, for these are not
    • theosophical, in the intellectual and spiritual sense, even
    • May we be together in this sense, even after we have parted,
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 1
    Matching lines:
    • the best sense — which we find in
    • order to achieve it they must offer sacrifice in a deeper sense to
    • a more profound sense, may be called sacerdotal — it is only
    • traced the cult of its intellectuality in its widest sense, with the
    • poured, there may be more or less consciously sensed something of the
    • spiritual forces, to which we too in the sense of our own time are
    • truth in the deepest and most spiritual sense of the words, however
    • in the modern, generally accepted sense of the word, because we are
    • aspects, the one grasped by the senses and outwardly visible, seen on
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • not use the term ‘miraculous’ in this sense, for to him
    • scene epitomises the sense of conflict which finds expression in
    • get any idea, still less any sense of what the Greek soul experienced
    • meteorology in such terms he would have thought as senseless as it
    • thought in the sense that it leads its own isolated thought-existence
    • occult sense of taste, the spiritual sense of taste. When
    • sense of taste, for he knows that the astral body and the etheric
    • sense of taste. In the case of the astral body the sense of taste is
    • with a sense of oppression. It is impossible to perceive the astral
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 4
    Matching lines:
    • call super-human, Beings not accessible to human sense-perception,
    • earthly beings of sense to have the Christ also among them once as an
    • earthly being of sense. But in His essential nature the Christ is not
    • stars, especially when he turned to Venus, he sensed in his soul the
    • Greek sense of one of the ‘wonders of the world’, and it
    • in the spiritual sense stars are. What are they to a quickened
    • can be seen by the physical senses.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 5
    Matching lines:
    • scientist of today naturally it would seem utter nonsense for anyone
    • space, though for the mind held captive by the sense-world it seems
    • the still clairvoyant ego. The Greek had a sense of tragedy when he
    • advanced in the sense that she inclined more towards the Earth,
    • looked back with a sense of tragedy to that old clairvoyant
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 6
    Matching lines:
    • by the exercise of our physical senses, by exercising our faculties
    • entirely to the physical world. It would be idle nonsense to say that
    • naturalist in the sense in which modern man believes he was, but he
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 7
    Matching lines:
    • at all — it would be nonsense to think that they do —
    • have been pure humbug, for they only make sense on the assumption
    • spiritual-scientific things in their true sense, one must forego the
    • claim that the human being always retains his common sense, and
    • the things of the higher spiritual worlds with common sense and
    • common sense within certain moulds, namely in those forms which in
    • obviously knows how to think scientifically in the modern sense of
    • professor has a sound common sense judgment for the things of the
    • with that part of his soul which brings common sense to bear on the
    • common sense will continue to accompany a man when he seeks to grasp
    • are the things for which common sense is adapted; and a man may well
    • of common sense, but that we should take our common sense along with
    • common sense. Then they fancy that, because they had it with them
    • things of the spiritual world with common sense. It is just that one
    • before you in a petty example was in a far higher sense a necessity
    • common sense which goes with normal consciousness and then make use
    • world, is that it should not lose its common sense and treat as
    • nonsense what, if it has held on to its common sense, reveals itself
    • if we are speaking in the true sense of the higher worlds. Hence you
    • beautiful in a different sense from that in which the late Greek
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 8
    Matching lines:
    • deteriorate, then we are in a very real sense being
    • becomes visible in the solution, so in a higher sense something of
    • In a certain sense
    • idea or mental representation is, in a higher sense, only the
    • of Jehovah-Christ, and in doing so light upon the true sense of the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 9
    Matching lines:
    • in a sense the representations of the sub-earthly, the Chthonic gods.
    • gods, those who, in the sense we explained yesterday, were the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 10
    Matching lines:
    • his senses, or even to his clairvoyant knowledge; he aims at a
    • must permeate ourselves with this in the Pauline sense. It is not our
    • in the Pauline sense with the Christ Impulse, and then plunge into
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 1
    Matching lines:
    • the best sense — which we find in
    • order to achieve it they must offer sacrifice in a deeper sense to
    • a more profound sense, may be called sacerdotal — it is only
    • traced the cult of its intellectuality in its widest sense, with the
    • poured, there may be more or less consciously sensed something of the
    • spiritual forces, to which we too in the sense of our own time are
    • truth in the deepest and most spiritual sense of the words, however
    • in the modern, generally accepted sense of the word, because we are
    • aspects, the one grasped by the senses and outwardly visible, seen on
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 3
    Matching lines:
    • not use the term ‘miraculous’ in this sense, for to him
    • scene epitomises the sense of conflict which finds expression in
    • get any idea, still less any sense of what the Greek soul experienced
    • meteorology in such terms he would have thought as senseless as it
    • thought in the sense that it leads its own isolated thought-existence
    • occult sense of taste, the spiritual sense of taste. When
    • sense of taste, for he knows that the astral body and the etheric
    • sense of taste. In the case of the astral body the sense of taste is
    • with a sense of oppression. It is impossible to perceive the astral
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 4
    Matching lines:
    • call super-human, Beings not accessible to human sense-perception,
    • earthly beings of sense to have the Christ also among them once as an
    • earthly being of sense. But in His essential nature the Christ is not
    • stars, especially when he turned to Venus, he sensed in his soul the
    • Greek sense of one of the ‘wonders of the world’, and it
    • in the spiritual sense stars are. What are they to a quickened
    • can be seen by the physical senses.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 5
    Matching lines:
    • scientist of today naturally it would seem utter nonsense for anyone
    • space, though for the mind held captive by the sense-world it seems
    • the still clairvoyant ego. The Greek had a sense of tragedy when he
    • advanced in the sense that she inclined more towards the Earth,
    • looked back with a sense of tragedy to that old clairvoyant
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 6
    Matching lines:
    • by the exercise of our physical senses, by exercising our faculties
    • entirely to the physical world. It would be idle nonsense to say that
    • naturalist in the sense in which modern man believes he was, but he
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 7
    Matching lines:
    • at all — it would be nonsense to think that they do —
    • have been pure humbug, for they only make sense on the assumption
    • spiritual-scientific things in their true sense, one must forego the
    • claim that the human being always retains his common sense, and
    • the things of the higher spiritual worlds with common sense and
    • common sense within certain moulds, namely in those forms which in
    • obviously knows how to think scientifically in the modern sense of
    • professor has a sound common sense judgment for the things of the
    • with that part of his soul which brings common sense to bear on the
    • common sense will continue to accompany a man when he seeks to grasp
    • are the things for which common sense is adapted; and a man may well
    • of common sense, but that we should take our common sense along with
    • common sense. Then they fancy that, because they had it with them
    • things of the spiritual world with common sense. It is just that one
    • before you in a petty example was in a far higher sense a necessity
    • common sense which goes with normal consciousness and then make use
    • world, is that it should not lose its common sense and treat as
    • nonsense what, if it has held on to its common sense, reveals itself
    • if we are speaking in the true sense of the higher worlds. Hence you
    • beautiful in a different sense from that in which the late Greek
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 8
    Matching lines:
    • deteriorate, then we are in a very real sense being
    • becomes visible in the solution, so in a higher sense something of
    • In a certain sense
    • idea or mental representation is, in a higher sense, only the
    • of Jehovah-Christ, and in doing so light upon the true sense of the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 9
    Matching lines:
    • in a sense the representations of the sub-earthly, the Chthonic gods.
    • gods, those who, in the sense we explained yesterday, were the
  • Title: Lecture: Wonders of the World: Lecture 10
    Matching lines:
    • his senses, or even to his clairvoyant knowledge; he aims at a
    • must permeate ourselves with this in the Pauline sense. It is not our
    • in the Pauline sense with the Christ Impulse, and then plunge into



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