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Searching Rudolf Steiner Lectures by GA number (GA0314)
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    Query was: concept
  

Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: Hygiene - a Social Problem
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    • the purely intellectualistic nature of the different conceptions is
    • beings. And this is why our whole conception of the social question
    • world-conception of so many modern men, and that far from being
    • spiritual conception of the world to speak like this and then build
    • rather, before conception — are fashioning and moulding the
    • by the abstract concepts of modern science, but because it shows
    • point. The other is that such a conception guards man against all the
    • conception of the world applicable to the practical details of life
    • processes which are then described according to the abstract concepts
    • principle or to anything upon which a conception of the world can be
    • of a conception of the world, and then we could begin to speak
    • conception of man think of the effect it would have in social life.
    • the world on the basis of purely abstract concepts. Healing can never
    • spring from abstract concepts, but only from a true knowledge of the
    • materialism has also spread into the medical conception of life, we
    • comprehensive conception of life. We need something
    • able to educate children on the basis of a conception of the world
    • the soul worked in the right way. This conception of the world
    • Science and that of merely intellectualistic science. The concepts
    • concepts of Spiritual Science, on the other hand, have themselves
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Fundamentals of Anthroposophical Medicine: Lecture I
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    • these old conceptions or to criticize them in any way, but it
    • must be emphasized that the conceptions I am putting forward
    • between the conceptions that will be presented here and those
    • conceptions arose in human thought at a time when there was no
    • sense) conception of the super-sensible world. Medicine, too,
    • was permeated with super-sensible conceptions, with conceptions
    • we shall find everywhere spiritual conceptions of the being of
    • conceptions of the form of the human being, the form of his
    • being, but in those older conceptions the super-sensible was as
    • with preconceptions will speak of those earlier ages in the
    • aspersions on the concepts of natural science. Indeed, I must
    • pedantically formed concepts.
    • our conception of a liver cell must differ essentially from our
    • conception of a cell in the brain or the blood. Only if it were
    • his conceptions.
    • have realized that current conceptions and theories are
    • materialistic conceptions if we are then able to introduce the
    • analyzing the structure of the brain but the conceptual life,
    • our conceptual life. Everything in the conceptual life can be
    • conceptual life. Something of the kind strikes us forcibly when
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Fundamentals of Anthroposophical Medicine: Lecture II
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    • already been done into line with the general conceptions I am
  • Title: Fundamentals of Anthroposophical Medicine: Lecture III
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    • conception of the modes of activity in the human organism
    • conception of these pathological phenomena if you say to
    • conceptions. A series of investigations should be made to show,
  • Title: Fundamentals of Anthroposophical Medicine: Lecture IV
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    • activity and also, to a great extent, conceptual activity
    • conceptual activity (I am referring now to the physical
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture I: Physiology and Therapeutics
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    • on the organic out of the inorganic, to delineate properly the concept of
    • conceptions regarding which, were they to be followed through with
    • be perceived. Then one must endow these conceptions — and atomism,
    • molecularism, are such conceptions — with ingredients that could never
    • the other, from arriving at the appropriate conceptions. Furthermore, the
    • arrive at fruitful conceptions. In the beginnings of a science, you need not
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture II: Physiology and Therapeutics
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    • entire practical conception of the nature of the healthy and sick
    • to the time before birth or, let us say, before conception; it points
    • we look through the conscious conceptual forces that reveal themselves
    • or, let us say, conception, birth, and death — can only be understood
    • have to dam up what is active in this thinking, conceptual, sensing
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture III: Physiology and Therapeutics
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    • must consider the following. The actual conceptual and perceptual
    • the carrier of the conceptual life. Then, if we raise our feelings to
    • system, we have breakdown processes, so that while our conceptual
  • Title: Lecture: Lecture IV: Physiology and Therapeutics
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    • gain correct concepts of heredity. To begin with, the female seed, the
    • not active, particularly not after conception. Particularly the female
    • germ that has undergone conception has a certain independence so that
  • Title: Anthroposophical Approach to Medicine: Lecture I
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    • anthroposophical conceptions.
    • words about the value of these old conceptions, or to criticise them
    • in any way. But it must be emphasised that the conceptions put
    • between the conceptions which will be put forward here and those of
    • earlier times. Those earlier conceptions arose in human thought at a
    • those earlier times man had a real but non-scientific conception of
    • conceptions of the human being that did not originate, as is the case
    • shall everywhere find traces of spiritual conceptions of the being of
    • conceptions of the form of man, of his organs and organic functions,
    • older conceptions the super-sensible was as much a part of man as
    • Goethean expression — a spiritual conception of the human being
    • against the concepts of modern science. Indeed, I must emphasise at
    • different from the modern conception.
    • at a conception of man, of the being of man in health and disease,
    • this sense our conception of a liver-cell must differ essentially
    • from our conception of a cell in the brain or the blood. For only if
    • of his conceptions.
    • of health and disease and have realised that current conceptions and
    • of human thought permits. Materialistic conceptions often achieve
    • conception and ideation, as Herbart, the philosopher, had once done.
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Anthroposophical Approach to Medicine: Lecture II
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    • unusual conception of empirical facts, but I think it will be quite
    • the general conceptions I am trying to indicate here. This
  • Title: Anthroposophical Approach to Medicine: Lecture III
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    • cannot, however, arrive at a well-founded conception of the modes of
    • form a general conception of pathological phenomena during the first
    • the terminology of an older, more instinctive conception of medicine
    • back to older conceptions. A series of investigations should be made
  • Title: Anthroposophical Approach to Medicine: Lecture IV
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    • proceed to form more general conceptions in special cases of illness
    • that process. So that when, without any kind of preconception, we
    • extent, conceptual activity — in so far as it is not volitional
    • but purely conceptual, ideative activity — is not dependent on



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