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Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Lecture: On the Nature of Butterflies
    Matching lines:
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man - The Being of Bees,
    • The Being of Bees,
    • Thanks to an anonymous donor, this lecture has been made available
    • experimenting along the lines of butterfly flight has never been
    • also to bees. It is likewise necessary for bees to lay their eggs where
    • has been lit that all sorts of insects flutter around in the room, feel
    • butterfly arises from light which has first been imprisoned.
    • could be pronounced only by the priest, because he had been prepared to
    • moreover have been true had he been too immature to behold spiritual
    • ovum was contained in Maria's, it must also have been in that of
    • Maria and Gertrude must have already been present in that of Katie, and
    • idler who has been pensioned off. This is a dreadful state of affairs,
    • been conducted round by a complete lunatic.
    • Fertilisation signifies that matter has first been destroyed. A minute
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture II
    Matching lines:
    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • practical bee-keeping. For the moment, on this side of practical
    • bee-keeping, very little, or perhaps not even anything much can be
    • of bee-keeping has something of the nature of a riddle. Obviously,
    • the bee-keeper is first of all interested in what he has to do.
    • Everyone must, in reality, take the greatest interest in bee-keeping,
    • given you here, the bees are able to gather what is already present
    • to this the bee, by means of its bodily structure and organisation, can
    • also take pollen from the plants. Thus the bee gathers from the plant
    • difficult to procure. Pollen is collected by the bees, with the help
    • of the minute brushes attached to their bodies, bees in the very,
    • In the bee we
    • bodily substances into wax — this the bee produces out of
    • itself — the bees now makes a special little container in which
    • question is raised how can the bee instinctively build so skilfully
    • The bee
    • which it thus absorbed. There lie the forces through which the bee
    • afterwards works, for what the bee makes externally lies in its
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture III
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    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • entitled “Do Bees perceive colours invisible to
    • bees — and vice versa. This only shows how thoughtlessly these
    • I made recently is quite correct. I said the bees have a sense which is
    • the bees, and it is similar in the case of ants. So little are these
    • All that has been
    • takes place in the bees when they are in the ultra-violet light.
    • bees. The chemical effects which the bees sense so strongly when they
    • the bee leaves the sphere of black, white, yellow and blue-grey and
    • something alien to it. There the bee can do nothing. It is thus so
    • important to note that the bee has a sense between taste and
    • chemical sense; it is entirely based on chemistry. The bee has
    • not contradict the fact that the bee is able to distinguish colour
    • you cover a surface with red paint and the bee approaches it, it experiences
    • warmth. How should the bee not know that this is different from
    • the bee senses coldness. The bee senses the warmth of red and the
    • one is not therefore justified in concluding that the bee sees
    • ascribe one to the mouse-trap! If one ascribes sight to the bees
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture IV
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    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • “Swiss Bee-keeper's Journal” with an article
    • has been said. And that, you see, is what I should like to call the
    • made on various subjects — let us say for instance bee-keeping
    • — were given out at special bee-keepers' meetings. This
    • was still so in my youth. At such a gathering of bee-keepers one
    • look at the bees. The bee flies out and gathers nectar. This it works upon
    • the bee prepares the wax. What does it do with the wax? It makes
    • crystals. The bee makes hexagonal cells, and this is extremely
    • interesting. If I could draw the bees' cells for you — or if
    • but what is put in them? The bees' eggs are
    • a hollow, and there the bee places its eggs. The bee is shaped by the
    • works in the body of the bee so that it can shape the wax in a form
    • within him. Man needs the same thing. Inasmuch as the bee is the
    • creature best able to give form to this hexagonal force, the bee is
    • from the plant kingdom — indirectly through the bee. But it comes
    • definite hexagonal form. The wax which is produced within the bee
    • this hexagonal force. But the silicic acid which has been driven as
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture V
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    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • ERBSMEHL remarked that in modern bee-keeping the
    • bee-master is primarily concerned with making a profit: it is the
    • found a number of very healthy children in a bee-keeper's house, and
    • the same also applies to the bees.
    • Erbsmehl can gather from the Journal that the bee-keeper in question was
    • evidently not aware what bee-keeping is in our days, and all the
    • which the bee-keeper spends in working are noted down quite exactly in a
    • modern apiary — how much time the bee-keeper has given to it and so
    • enterprise should surely make a profit. But if the bee-keeper remains
    • honey at six francs. The American bee-keepers take exactly this
    • whole stock of bees will die out. I really cannot understand what Dr.
    • bee-keeping will be endangered.
    • second point — i.e., what announcing the death of the bee-master
    • to the bees has to do with the bee-master, I have already stated that
    • frequently buy American honey. When bees are fed oil this honey, they
    • die — and yet it is produced by bees.
    • question how far can a bee sting affect a man, I know of a case which I
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  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture VI
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    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • diseases of bees, he thinks these could not formerly have been as bad
    • as they are today when the bees are over-exploited.
    • combs and not artificial ones. He does not think that bee diseases
    • in Switzerland from England which had not been known in the past.
    • bee-diseases the question is, as is usual in disease, namely, that we must
    • essentially different comes in question. The bee-keeper of the past
    • bee-keeper of old had very good instincts as how to treat the bees, I should
    • the bees the old straw skeps as in former days, and giving them
    • handling. When I add to this all the bee-keeper did in former times,
    • bee-hives on some chosen spot, where the wind would blow more often
    • from one quarter or another, and so on. Today one sets the bee-hives
    • things as these certainly, very definitely, affect the bees with
    • the body of the bee when it must first gather the nectar from the
    • immense work. How does the bee accomplish it? It is accomplished
    • fluids in the bee. One of these is the gastric juices and the other
    • the blood-fluid. When you study the bee you find the whitish gastric
    • elements of which the bee is constituted, and all the other parts are
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture VII
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    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • were asked as to the affinity between bees and flowers which unites them
    • matured, till the bee is there. With the Queen this period is sixteen
    • days, with the worker-bee twenty-one — twenty-two days, and in
    • the root of this? When a bee develops as a Queen it is due to the
    • special feeding it has been given; the Queen larva are differently
    • fed so that growth is accelerated. Now the bees are creatures of the
    • upon its own axis as the worker-bee needs to come to maturity. The
    • development proceeds at the rate of the worker-bee, which is that of
    • almost a complete revolution of the Sun, the nearer the bee
    • moves, the more the bee comes under the influences of the earth. The
    • worker-bee is indeed largely a creature of the Sun, but already
    • this trinity; we have the Queen, the worker-bees, in which there are
    • become Queens or worker-bees; the remaining portion that are
    • fecundated, Queens, worker-bees and drones can emerge, because the
    • earthly. Thus even when there are worker-bees and drones, the latter
    • I was told that if anyone has rheumatism and gets stung by a bee or a wasp,
    • bee.
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  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture VIII
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    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • creatures, bees, wasps and ants are related to one another, though
    • already. Perhaps, for instance, a tree has been cut down and the
    • stump has been left standing; an ant colony comes along and makes a
    • be all very well, but nothing very much has then been said, for when the
    • earth, minute fragments of wood, and in some corner that has been
    • sight, that something in the store cupboard has been nibbled, and the
    • of ants as a unity; the colony of bees, for example, is wise in this
    • though the ground had been very finely paved. Through the ants biting
    • the eggs mature the grubs creep out of them. Bees, and other insects
    • mature? The caterpillar has been their foster-mother, nourishing the
    • Naturally, as human beings, when we see the bee, we say; the bees
    • give us honey, therefore bee-keeping is of use to us. Very good; but
    • this is from the point of view of man. If the bees are robbers, and
    • would say, as it were; out there are those robbers, the bees, wasps
    • let us say a bee, is sucking the juices of the flower, or from the willow
    • if the bee, or the wasp or some other insect, did not come to suck
    • had always been as it is today, when we find the dead lime-stone, the
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  • Title: Nine Lectures on Bees: Lecture IX
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    • Nine Lectures on Bees
    • The unconscious wisdom contained in the beehive - the hive is in
    • The Functioning of Spirit in Nature and in Man. The Being of Bees.
    • We have been
    • bees, wasps and ants. There is, may be, little in Nature which permits us
    • interest you in connection with the bees. The work of the bees is
    • the bee is really not that it produces honey but, that it produces
    • hive, but the bee actually works in such a way that it does not use
    • transforms what it brings into the hive. The bee works from out of
    • a kind of bee which does not work in this way, but shows, precisely in its
    • consider this bee; it is commonly called the wood-bee, and is not so
    • valued as the domestic bee, because it is mostly rather a nuisance.
    • We will consider this wood-bee at its work.
    • live — not the individual bee, but the whole species — must
    • do a terrific amount of work. This bee searches out such wood as is no
    • longer on a living tree, but has been made into something. One finds
    • the wood-bee which I shall presently describe, with its nest in a
    • place where wooden rails, or posts have been driven in and the wood
    • wherever one has made use of wood. Here the wood-bee makes its nest,
    • The wood-bee comes along and first of all bores a sloping passage from
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Cosmic Workings: Lecture IV
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    • The lectures in this volume have been selected from the very large
    • have been due to iron. We must assume that iron is everywhere present
    • Catholic Sunday paper announced that there had been a real fire here
    • too little chlorine is created and so the disease has also been given
  • Title: Cosmic Workings: Lecture V
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    • The lectures in this volume have been selected from the very large
    • body. Just recently there has been discussion in
    • Exchange can do it, but nobody else!) This has been done with all
    • been greatly occupied with this point in connection with Infantile
    • reference to the question which has been put.
    • other investigations have been made in Stuttgart. These things are
    • etc., so that all knowledge is split up. This has been for



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