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  • Title: History of Art: Lecture I: Cimabue, Giotto, and Other Italian Masters
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • own. Cimabue (or those who worked in the spirit of the school
    • that is named after him) — Cimabue was working at about the
    • concerned, the work of Cimabue emerges in such a way that to
    • our way into what comes before us in Cimabue's work, we find
    • bring forth really plastic works of art. We know from earlier
    • are connected with the Mystery of Golgotha and with its workings.
    • earlier work having been lost, — in Cimabue's paintings or
    • where Cimabue's own works are before us, for his pictures were
    • some of Cimabue's pictures. His works are mostly to be seen in
    • which were believed to be at work, moulding the eye organically
    • something working in with abundant power from distant worlds.
    • background work upon them, they had the feeling of a mighty
    • whether all the works which a well-founded tradition ascribes to
    • point. It is true that under Giotto's name many works are
    • the Divina Commedia of Dante. Dante's great work is to be
    • two-dimensional conception, to Giotto, in whose work we see
    • in his artistic work we find a feeling similar to that of St.
    • long been working at his Hymn to Nature — the great and
    • work, while this belongs to a very late period in Giotto's life.
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture II: Leonardo, Michelangelo and Raphael
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • let us paint it, and it will represent a work of Art. Of course, it
    • quality of their work, into their whole manner of presentation; nor
    • to be prevalent today they can set to work and ciriticise Raphael or
    • their creative work unless we understand the character which Christianity
    • that were at work within himself, the forces which we today describe
    • from within outward the forces that are at work in man, he tried to
    • the working of the formative
    • inner being works into the outer form. Yes, there is truth in this,
    • hand was working, therefore, from a many-sided understanding of the
    • but as an entertainer to amuse the Court, most certainly. The works
    • him afterwards, on his return to Florence, working at a battle-picture,
    • feeling into the works he created; Michelangelo carried a Florentine
    • work. Indeed, he loved his protector, and grew together in his own soul
    • of Florence. We can even recognise how the plastic quality of his work
    • in the Pieta in the Vatican a work which in the last resort is born
    • on the other hand, that in the works of Michelangelo in the Sistine
    • most wonderful works, in the Medici Chapel. But in the background of
    • taken abstractly today, but in the soul of Michelangelo they worked
    • to the impressions of Leonardo's works. We will first show some of his
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture III: Dürer and Holbein
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • way they were undoubtedly at work even at the time of the first
    • something that lies beneath the outer objects works into their
    • things will always feel through it the working of ancient runes,
    • much as finished works of Art but as ideas of human life and cosmic
    • old Paganism. Once more, I do not mean perfect works of plastic Art
    • working more from within outward — from the impulses of Will
    • and not contemplative vision. This imagination, working forth from
    • extant works of Art, whether of the North, or of the South, or
    • you will realise, working in all this, a Northern impulse that
    • exquisitely printed miniatures, in the biblical works created in
    • individual life of the soul, works from within and pours itself
    • interwoven, for example, in the works proceeding from the Gothic.
    • spirit, as it works at the same time in man himself and in the
    • Faust himself working and weaving in the wondrous twilight of the
    • this most wonderfully. Here we already recognise the working of the
    • natural for the everyday, workaday things of human life to have
    • mainly seeks to express the Divine that works in man, the Universal
    • sculptured works, you see most beautifully combined on the one
    • work, you see the life of the soul poured out into the facial
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  • Title: History of Art: Lecture IV: Mid-European and Southern Art
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • studies on the great works of Art, we will show some further slides
    • by no means easy now to see how these things really worked
    • artistic qualities, for all that works in form and colouring, in
    • expression in the great works of Art, are also living in the whole
    • the artist works into the spheres of form and color and expression.
    • The time itself works through the soul of the artist. The whole
    • culture of the age finds expression in the characteristic works of
    • the Mid-European, or Northern element, works its way upwards more
    • plastic works of Donatello, Michelangelo, Raphael, Leonardo and
    • of work and progress in the best souls, from the 11th century on
    • world-conception as a whole, there arose the works of Art which we
    • what I might call a slow and silent working towards the deepening
    • movement and emotion — all this was working its way up from
    • down to us. Take, for instance, what works upon us with such
    • Figure that works upon us. In Middle Europe it is, rather, the life
    • Christ type which was afterwards worked out by Dürer.
    • individual, as it works its way upwards out of every single human
    • Such, truly, was the Southern imagination as it worked in the world
    • worked with the heart and mind of the people. And without a doubt,
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  • Title: History of Art: Lecture V: Rembrandt
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • immediate impression of his works — so far as is possible through
    • at least a few of his main works, — only then do we realise how
    • when we contemplate the creative work of human individualities, we cannot
    • of their greatest works.
    • and worked? It was when the Thirty-Years' War was ravaging Mid-Europe.
    • other works of Art which we have shown — betrays strong Latin,
    • of the free cities — comes to expression in the works —
    • with that which works and weaves in space.
    • in the ever more perfect working out of light and darkness. Color to
    • his life, because of the elemental forces working in him so strongly,
    • were, to reveal the working of the pure distribution of light and darkness
    • and more in Rembrandt's work as time goes on, the boldest imaginable
    • creating. He created his great works by using his figures, as it were, to
    • work of Art springs from this intangible element which he attains by
    • works for the particular subjects which the pictures represent, is to
    • look past the essential work of Art. It is only when we contemplate
    • period of his work how really the colors in his pictures are created
    • that towards the end of his life's work, color recedes, as it were,
    • existence from decade to decade in Rembrandt's work. For it is undeniable
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture VI: Dutch and Flemish Painting
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • to work. We can see it, my dear friends, if only we bring to these works
    • we may regard as the fundamental frame-work of the artistic conceptions
    • principle is at work, is emerging in the North; this principle we see
    • its way into their works, is borrowed more from France and Burgundy.
    • Eyck, and there arises in this period one of the greatest of all works
    • portrayed how the Impulse of the Lamb works in the various callings,
    • continued working at it for many years, and scholars have long been
    • should be like; he does not work out of any such impulse, but as he
    • There is a kind of echo of artistic tradition. In Van Eyck's work we
    • they are not by any means predominant in his work, still we can see
    • Hayden's work, there is a certain drama in the working together of the
    • works more or less equally along the lines of Van der Weyden on the
    • of things is working its way through more and more. Man as an artist
    • how strongly the Southern influence is already working in the element
    • In his work we find a strong
    • observation. His work is permeated with a fanciful, fantastic feeling
    • sphere of the peasantry. His works are born of the elemental simplicity
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture VII: Representations of the Nativity
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • And now we will take the same motif as it appears in the work of Niccola
    • Northern Masters, whose names you know. First we have a work of Schongauer'
    • hold of here by all that I described to you — the working out of
    • Finally we give two works
    • of these painters. The next is by the artist who worked in Bruges and
    • 56. Workshop of Albrecht Dürer. Resting on
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture VIII: Raphael and the Northern Artists
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • creations work upon his soul, will admit that in Raphael — with
    • been attained. When we let them work upon us and try to understand them,
    • in his works, and how does it stand in relation to the World? Think
    • being that worked to create it — the human being, Raphael himself.
    • and principle had to be working in his very soul. This is, indeed, the
    • was already emphasized by Hermann Grimm. Raphael's work takes its course
    • age of thirty-seven, he is working at the Transfiguration, which
    • of four years, something of the nature of a cosmic principle works in
    • background. Hence Raphael's work is so strongly separated from his
    • expression in his work so perfectly; so self-contained, so inwardly
    • other Art is measured by this standard. The works of this Art are the
    • at the beginning of the four-year period which dominated all his work.
    • Raphael's work is the last, the highest, the closing act in a great
    • in its present meaning, to the works we shall now let pass before our
    • We will now let work upon
    • works in the same way as of Raphael's. In Dürer's case we shall
    • In Raphael's works these
    • things are always there before us. In Dürer's work, on the other
    • of the cities, working its way towards the Reformation. Nor does he
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: History of Art: Lecture IX:
    Matching lines:
    • are images of the artworks that were presented with the lectures. The
    • the creation of their works of art the Greeks proceeded according to
    • of this work of Goethe's. But, as a rule, we have not a ufficiently
    • on which Nature works. In so doing, he was, indeed, steering straight
    • in their works of art was characteristic of the fourth.
    • He did not work after the model as was done in later times — (whether
    • work from the model is only a peculiarity of the Fifth post-Atlantean age.
    • work its way forth in the overcoming of these hindrances. We have to
    • they are working hard to turn him into a kind of carnivorous monkey.
    • as working towards the ideal, to “monkeyfy” the human race.
    • work to bring out the apishness of Man. For if that human being were
    • original works have been preserved. Most of them are only handed down
    • with the illustrations we shall see today. Even in the early works of
    • and bring some of his works before our souls, we shall see how what
    • of Art are wont to do — of a decline in the latest works. In the earlier
    • certain restfulness or repose pervades the older works. Movement itself
    • progressive movement. Thus there is more of movement in the later works.
    • be said in connection with the single works that will be shown.
    • These works of art in the
    • These works take us to the
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.



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