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Here are the matching lines in their respective documents. Select one of the highlighted words in the matching lines below to jump to that point in the document.

  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture I: The Necessity for a Spiritual Insight
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • world.
    • everything spiritual in the world.
    • conviction. Conviction, when the isolation of our worldly life
    • and worldly outlook makes us ask: “What is the eternal,
    • super-sensible reality underlying the world of sense-perception?”
    • of divine, super-sensible worlds. We may form beliefs as to what our
    • natural, but with the divine ordering of the world.
    • and noise of the outer world. Just as the eye must shut itself against
    • world, so must it sleep a great deal. For whenever it is confronted
    • with the world, it has to observe, to hold inward converse. Every
    • it can participate in the life of the outer world. In the same way the
    • child participates in the life of the outer world, lives entirely
    • within the external world — does not yet feel itself
    • — but lives entirely in the outer world.
    • outer world, but the thoughts and the logic to which alone we grant
    • experience of the outer world which the child has? — the child
    • things because he is so connected with the whole world that he
    • child the adult is the mediator between the divine world and himself
    • of the world and the child? Well, what has the child become? Between
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture II: Spiritual Disciplines of Yesterday: Yoga
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • world outlook from which I now speak, is generally not understood
    • world. If intellect, if mind were active we should not be able to
    • understand the world. Mind has to be passive so that the
    • world may be understood through it. If it were active it would
    • continually alter and impinge upon the world. Mind is the passive
    • egoism and which seek power in the external world. The older Yoga
    • Thinking goes on in us even when we stand aside from the world merely
    • to-day in order to find entry into the world of spirit. But this is
    • world of appearance (the unreality) which can be perceived by sheer
    • “Knowledge of the Higher Worlds,”
    • external world. Or one sinks into the plant until one feels how
    • the plant; one dives right into the external world. And then, O then
    • — one is taken up by the external world. One awakens as from a
    • but how if the world is not to be comprehended in the abstract
    • concepts of logic? How if the world be a work of art; then we must
    • of discipline only. We should not understand anything about the world
    • But one is not called upon to do this. A few people in the world can
    • can be comprehended. It is the same thing with the spiritual world. It
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture III: Spiritual Disciplines of Yesterday and To-day
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • of spiritual worlds is called up. These exercises consisted in
    • When we want to see into the spiritual world — this seeing is
    • intercourse with the world.
    • perpetually have the whole spiritual world of the universe about us
    • nothing of the spiritual world by means of it, — just as one can
    • becomes trans-parent. And just as it is possible to perceive the world
    • possible for the whole organism to perceive the spiritual world
    • of the super-sensible, the spiritual world, one should betake oneself
    • lived the ordinary life of the world; but that knowledge of spiritual
    • worlds could only be won in solitude, and that one who sought such
    • home in the world, That solitude which former ages regarded as the
    • relation to knowledge, and we cannot learn of spiritual worlds in his
    • lead into the spiritual world.
    • and the body should be translucent to the spiritual world. We must
    • thus we shall constrain the body to be transparent to the world of
    • “Knowledge of the Higher Worlds.”
    • from life and become hermits, but keeps us active in the world
    • whole span of life. Then the world of spirit will become visible to
    • us. We do indeed see a spiritual world around us when our body has
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture IV: Body Viewed from the Spirit
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • impressions of the outside world affect the whole organism, work right
    • his own world of inner experience. Let us suppose the person m charge
    • itself to the world. Little by little he must transform his inherited
    • the world: men who each time they see a new thing can bring their
    • men to meet the world with a free and open mind, and to act in
    • accordance with the demands of the world.
    • unsuitable for the outer world. They are inherited. Gradually above
    • second tooth, which is permanent, is a thing adapted to the world.
    • organism. When we are born into the world we bear within us an
    • matter to be merely the concern of the material world.
    • the outer world. In a child between the change of teeth and puberty it
    • whole world of morality, — he has to grow up to it. And this he
    • external world and that part of life concerned with morality: both
    • problems from out of the universe, the world at large. Though I may be
    • cosmic world has given us birth and given us a place within itself. A
    • order of the world. In face of lightning lashes in the clouds we feel
    • the world. And above all we must feel religious towards the child, for
    • to what the world is. In this mood lies one of the most important
    • feeling of tragedy if we receive as a gift from spiritual worlds, and
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture V: How Knowledge Can Be Nurture
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • which copied things or happenings in the surrounding world; or else
    • not experienced anthropomorphism in its relation to the world will be
    • “subject,” but we simply unfold the world itself in vivid
    • distinction between oneself and the world. Before this time there was
    • teach him of an external world of our surroundings.
    • gradually introduce him to the external world. The child acquires a
    • from the plant world, to experience its objectivity and its connection
    • this is educating the child by contact with life in the world.
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture VI: The Teacher as Artist in Education
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    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • years the skeleton adapts itself to the outer world. A mechanic and
    • does man's adaptation to the outer world become complete. Only now is
    • man a true child of the world, only now must he live with the mechanic
    • and dynamic of the world, only now does he experience what is called
    • year, the bone system, which is adjusting itself to the outer world,
    • of the world we have before us. We must accept such an inward artistic
    • conceiving — we must not dogmatise: The world shall only be
    • not take to the outside world with any pleasure, because his body
    • functions abroad in the world. A phlegmatic child is entirely given up
    • to the world. He is absorbed into the world. He lives very little in
    • organism functions through interplay with the outer world.
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture VII: The Organisation of the Waldorf School
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • particular object in the world it will be far livelier than it would
    • Naturally it is the most horrible thing in the world to an artistic
    • soul. In this way the living reality of the world becomes part of a
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture VIII: Boys and Girls at the Waldorf School
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • into the world by the divine spiritual powers of the world, it is a
    • This has the effect of making the liver into a kind of world of its
    • own, a world apart in the human being.
    • [Literally “Aussenwelt,” — outer world.]
    • world. You will effect an extraordinary improvement in the case of a
    • it was in no need of a name. But since in this terrestrial world men
  • Title: Spiritual Ground: Lecture IX: The Teachers of the Waldorf School
    Matching lines:
    • of the being of man and the world, which is at the same time scientific
    • external world affect the female organism more intensely between the
    • bodily of the super-sensible world.
    • the whole world, from the universe, and be regulated by it. And
    • his relationship to the outer world is quite other than it was in the
    • this age the whole world drones and surges within a boy — the
    • world, that is, of this earthly environment.
    • is, as it were, a flowing into the maiden of supernal worlds. The
    • recent advances of materialistic science of the world come into their
    • advocates a thing so alien to the world — not that I mean that
    • Anthroposophy is alien to the world — but that the world is alien
    • from the spiritual world. So that it is precisely among those who
    • A boy of 14 or 15 years old echoes in his being the world around him.
    • world about them. The girl has taken up into herself something not of
    • And a girl of 14 or 15 is a being who faces the world in amazement,
    • finding it full of problems; above all, a being who seeks in the world
    • ideals to live by. Thus many things in the outer world become
    • To a boy the inner world presents many enigmas. To a girl it is the
    • outer world.
    • upon some day should confront us with a world of darkness, a world in
    • Maximum number of matches per file exceeded.



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